Here’s how you can watch an astronaut perform an enlistment ceremony from outer space tomorrow

Everyone remembers their oath of enlistment ceremony, but how many people can say theirs was truly out of this world? Tomorrow, over 800 soldiers participating in a ceremony spanning more than 100 locations around the country will be able to say theirs was. What makes this ceremony so special? It's being administered by Army astronaut Col. Andrew Morgan from the International Space Station.

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MilSpouse and NASA's last living 'Hidden Figure,' Katherine Johnson, dies at 101

You knew she had a legendary mind. Did you know she was a military spouse?

NASA legend, mathematician, race barrier breaker, women's rights advancer, mother, military spouse: Katherine Johnson was truly out of this world. The once in a generation mind passed away at age 101 on February 24, NASA announced.

Johnson was born in 1918 in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. From an early age, she demonstrated a love of counting and numbers far beyond her peers and well beyond her years. By age 10, Johnson was already through her grade school curriculum and enrolled in high school, which she finished at 14. She enrolled in West Virginia State College at only age 15 and started pursuing her love of math.

According to NASA, while at WVSC, Johnson had the opportunity to study under well known professor Dr. William W. Schiefflin Claytor. Claytor guided Johnson in her career path, once telling her, "You'd make a great research mathematician." He also provided her guidance with how to become one. In an interview with NASA, Johnson recalled, "Many professors tell you that you'd be good at this or that, but they don't always help you with that career path. Professor Claytor made sure I was prepared to be a research mathematician." Claytor's spirit of mentorship was something that Johnson paid forward. "Claytor was a young professor himself," she said, "and he would walk into the room, put his hand in his pocket, and take some chalk out, and continue yesterday's lesson. But sometimes I could see that others in the class did not understand what he was teaching. So I would ask questions to help them. He'd tell me that I should know the answer, and I finally had to tell him that I did know the answer, but the other students did not. I could tell."

Johnson became the first black woman to attend West Virginia University's graduate school. Following graduation, she became a school teacher, settled down and married. She spent many years at home with her three daughters, but when her husband became ill, she began teaching again. In the early 1950s, a family friend told Johnson that NACA (the predecessor to NASA) was hiring. According to NASA, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics were specifically looking for African-American females to work as "computers" in what was then their Guidance and Navigation Department. In the 1950s, pools of women at NACA did calculations that the engineers needed worked or verified.

Johnson applied but the openings were already filled. The following year, she applied again, and this time she was offered two contracts. She took the one as a researcher. She started working at NACA in 1953. In 1956, her husband died of an inoperable brain tumor. In 1959, Johnson remarried James A. Johnson, an Army captain and Korean War veteran.

Johnson was a pioneer for multiple reasons. Not only was she a working woman in the 1950s, an era during which women were generally secretaries if they worked at all, she was also a black woman. In an interview for the book "Black Women Scientists in the United States," Johnson recalled, "We needed to be assertive as women in those days – assertive and aggressive – and the degree to which we had to be that way depended on where you were. I had to be. In the early days of NASA women were not allowed to put their names on the reports – no woman in my division had had her name on a report. I was working with Ted Skopinski and he wanted to leave and go to Houston ... but Henry Pearson, our supervisor – he was not a fan of women – kept pushing him to finish the report we were working on. Finally, Ted told him, 'Katherine should finish the report, she's done most of the work anyway.' So Ted left Pearson with no choice; I finished the report and my name went on it, and that was the first time a woman in our division had her name on something."

If Johnson was intimidated, she never showed it. "The women did what they were told to do," she explained in an interview with NASA. "They didn't ask questions or take the task any further. I asked questions; I wanted to know why. They got used to me asking questions and being the only woman there."

NASA photo

Johnson was so well known for her capabilities, that John Glenn personally asked for her before his orbit in 1962. According to NASA, "The complexity of the orbital flight had required the construction of a worldwide communications network, linking tracking stations around the world to IBM computers in Washington, Cape Canaveral in Florida, and Bermuda. The computers had been programmed with the orbital equations that would control the trajectory of the capsule in Glenn's Friendship 7 mission from liftoff to splashdown, but the astronauts were wary of putting their lives in the care of the electronic calculating machines, which were prone to hiccups and blackouts. As a part of the preflight checklist, Glenn asked engineers to 'get the girl'—Johnson—to run the same numbers through the same equations that had been programmed into the computer, but by hand, on her desktop mechanical calculating machine. 'If she says they're good,'' Katherine Johnson remembers the astronaut saying, 'then I'm ready to go.' Glenn's flight was a success, and marked a turning point in the competition between the United States and the Soviet Union in space."

Johnson was an instrumental part of the team and was the only woman to be pulled from the calculating pool room to work on other projects. One of those projects: putting a man on the moon.

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Johnson lived a remarkable life and had a prestigious career. Her awards and decorations are numerous, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Congressional Gold Medal, honorary doctorate from William and Mary, a facility being named after her at NASA's Langley campus and even a Barbie made in her image. She had a fervor for learning and a love of life.

"Like what you do, and then you will do your best," she said.

Rest in peace, Ms. Johnson.

MilSpouse and NASA's last living 'Hidden Figure,' Katherine Johnson, dies at 101

You knew she had a legendary mind. Did you know she was a military spouse?

NASA legend, mathematician, race barrier breaker, women's rights advancer, mother, military spouse: Katherine Johnson was truly out of this world. The once in a generation mind passed away at age 101 on February 24, NASA announced.

Keep reading...

WATCH: Of course the 62-year-old who broke the world record for planking is a Marine vet

And just in case the 8 hours 15 minutes, 15 seconds of holding a plank wasn't enough, he ended his day with 75 push ups.

For most people, holding a plank for a full minute is a challenge. But for 62-year-old George Hood who broke the Guinness World Record (GWR) for holding a plank yesterday, it was mind over matter. The Marine veteran turned DEA Supervisory Special Agent held the position for an insane 8 hours, 15 minutes and 15 seconds.

In an interview with Chicago's Fox 32, Hood said he got the idea in 2010 when the category was added as a world record. Since then, GWR reported he underwent several training camps and fitness regiments, including doing 674,000 sit ups, 270,000 push ups and a practice attempt in which he lasted 10 hours and 10 minutes in 2018.

Hood posted on Facebook following his incredible achievement: "So very proud of this particular GWR because I have finally retired the pose as I know it and will pursue other fitness endeavors. I'm proud to share this feat with my 3 sons Andrew, Brandon and Christopher. So very grateful for an outstanding TeamHood crew and a staff at 515 Fitness, led by their owner Niki Perry, that came together just one more time to achieve victory. More to follow, training continues.

After holding the plank, Hood did 75 push ups. Just because he could. Semper Fi!

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Beloved Coast Guard veteran and crossing guard, ‘Mr. Bob,’ dies while saving two children from speeding car

Every child can tell you the name of their school's crossing guard. At Christ the King Catholic School in Kansas City, KS, 88-year-old Robert James Nill, better known and loved as "Mr. Bob," was one of the best.

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How a MultiTool is changing the game of fishing and veterans' lives

Fishing takes enough patience. Don't waste it on managing your line.

Fishing takes an insane amount of patience, but it should be spent waiting for the perfect catch, not used solely on managing your line.

The Gerber LineDriver Fishing MultiTool is a game changer, and no, we're not getting paid to say that.

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Here's the group of veterans making the best NFL teams better

Every professional athlete will tell you there's a science behind elite performance. Every coach will tell you there's one for team dynamics as well. And, every military leader will say their best performing units are men and women who understand the importance of not just bettering themselves, but constantly working toward improving the group as a whole.

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WATCH: Struggle, legacy and honor through 3 generations

Carl Brashear overcame every odd thrown his way: racism, addiction and even an amputation.

The U.S. Navy's first African American diver, Carl Brashear, used to always say, "It's not a sin to get knocked down, it's a sin to stay down." His son, Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer Phillip Brashear, tells his family's story of struggle, legacy and honor.

From conquering racism and alcoholism to refusing to let a leg amputation end his Navy career, Carl is truly an American hero. Watch as both Phillip and his son continue that legacy.

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WATCH: Tom Hanks takes on soldier in a push up contest at the Oscars Red Carpet

This should have won an Academy Award.

Did you know that Tom Hanks is an honorary inductee to the Army Ranger Hall of Fame? Judging by his push ups on the soaking wet Red Carpet at the 2020 Academy Awards, at age 63, he's definitely still in fighting shape.

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