Widgets Magazine

Pentagon urges US to lead in 5G technology

The next advancement in cellular technology, 5G, is expected to be so fast that it's able to surpass the speed of wired internet now provided by cable companies.

Current 4G technology provides download speeds of about 1 gigabit per second. With 5G technology, download speeds are expected to increase to 20 gigabits per second, said Ellen M. Lord, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition and sustainment.

Lord spoke yesterday at the Atlantic Council here to discuss the Defense Department's efforts to advance 5G technology in the United States and to ensure that when 5G does make its debut, it's secure enough to transmit information between U.S. military personnel and its allies without being intercepted by potential adversaries.

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93 year-old 'Rosie the Riveter' makes appeal to Congress

Mae Krier was on Capitol Hill, hoping to get Congress to recognize March 21 as an annual Rosie the Riveter Day of Remembrance.

Rosie the Riveter was an iconic World War II poster showing a female riveter flexing her muscle.

Krier also advocating that lawmakers award the "Rosies" — as women involved in the war effort at home came to call themselves — the Congressional Gold Medal for their work in the defense industry producing tanks, planes, ships and other materiel for the war effort.

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How Arlington Cemetery will expand next year

For its second act of expansion, Arlington National Cemetery plans to grow southward onto property formerly occupied by the Navy Annex. Work there will begin in 2020, said the cemetery's executive director.

Karen Durham-Aguilera spoke March 12, 2019, before the House Appropriations Committee's subcommittee on military construction, veterans affairs and related agencies. She told lawmakers the cemetery plans to break ground on the first phase of the project in 2020. She also thanked them for providing the appropriate funding to make it happen.

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DOD describes space as a 'warfighting domain' and urges Space Force

The U.S. Space Force will allow the Defense Department to deliver space capabilities and results faster, better, and ahead of adversaries, Pentagon officials said March 1, 2019.

Officials spoke with reporters on background in advance of the announcement that DOD delivered a proposal for establishing the sixth branch of the armed forces to Congress. The proposal calls for the U.S. Space Force to lodge in the Department of the Air Force.

"What underpins the entire discussion is the importance of space to life here on Earth," an official said. "Space truly is vital to our way of life and our way of war, and that has really been increasing over time."

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US Strategic Commander calls for modernizing 'nuclear triad'

The nuclear triad, which is composed of submarine-launched ballistic missiles, intercontinental ballistic missiles and bombers, "is the most important element of our national defense, and we have to make sure that we're always ready to respond to any threat," the commander of U.S. Strategic Command said on Feb. 26, 2019.

"I can do that today because I have the most powerful triad in the world," Air Force Gen. John E. Hyten said.

Hyten and Air Force Gen. Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, the commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command, spoke Feb. 26, 2019, regarding their respective commands at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the fiscal year 2020 defense budget request.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Jim Garamone

Leadership lessons from Iwo Jima

The vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff spoke about leadership to educators responsible for training the next generations of military leaders at the Association of Military Colleges on Feb. 25, 2019.

Air Force Gen. Paul J. Selva used the experience of the Battle of Iwo Jima in February 1945 as an example of leadership in action and a time when normal men rose to sublime levels of leadership.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
C. Todd Lopez

DOD survey finds that most spouses are satisfied with military life

The latest survey of active-duty and reserve-component service members' spouses shows the spouses are, by and large, happy with the military lifestyles they lead.

Defense Department officials briefed reporters at the Pentagon Feb. 21, 2019, on the results of the surveys, which were conducted in 2017.

The survey of active-duty spouses and a similar survey of National Guard and Reserve spouses showed similar results, they said. Among active-duty spouses, 60 percent claimed they are "satisfied" with their military way of life. Among the reserve components, 61 percent were satisfied.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
Terri Moon Cronk

Spec Ops leaders tell Congress they're in the 'risk business'

Calling the breadth and capability of the U.S. Special Operations Forces "astonishing," the assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conflict discussed the global posture of the nation's special operations enterprise during a hearing Feb. 14, 2019, on Capitol Hill.

Owen O. West appeared before the Senate Armed Services Committee with Army Gen. Raymond A. Thomas III, the commander of U.S. Special Operations Command.

West said that while special operations forces make up just 3 percent of the joint force, they have absorbed more than 40 percent of the casualties since 2001. "This sacrifice serves as a powerful reminder that special operators are in the risk business," he said.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
Terri Moon Cronk

Pentagon releases an artificial intelligence strategy and it's straight up Skynet

The Defense Department launched its artificial intelligence strategy Feb. 12, 2019, in concert with Feb. 11, 2019's White House executive order that created the American Artificial Intelligence Strategy.

"The [executive order] is paramount for our country to remain a leader in AI, and it will not only increase the prosperity of our nation, but also enhance our national security," Dana Deasy, DOD's chief information officer, said in a media roundtable.

The CIO and Air Force Lt. Gen. Jack Shanahan, first director of DOD's Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, discussed the strategy's launch with reporters.

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