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MIGHTY TACTICAL
Daniel Brown

9 photos of the US military's most powerful and most expensive helicopter

The US Marine Corps received its first CH-53K King Stallion on May 16, 2018, landing at Marine Corps Air Station New River in North Carolina, according to The Drive.

"[This is] the most powerful helicopter the United States has ever fielded," CH-53 program chief Marine Col. Hank Vanderborght said in April 2018. "Not only the most powerful, the most modern and also the smartest."


But it's also the most expensive. With a price tag of about $144 million, it costs more than the F-35A Lightning II joint strike fighter.

Still, the King Stallion can haul three times more than the helicopter it's replacing, the CH-53E Super Stallion.

Here's what it can do:

Engineered by Sikorsky, the CH-53K King Stallion made its first flight in 2015.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation is a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, one of the largest defense contractors and political donors in the US.

Source: Defense News

It's about 28 feet high and 99 feet in length.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

It's powered by three T408-GE-400 turboshaft engines, which can bring the King Stallion to a maximum speed of about 230 mph.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command, The Drive

And has a maximum altitude of about 9,520 feet.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

It also has a maximum takeoff weight of about 88,000 pounds, and can externally haul more than 27,000 pounds — three times what the CH-53E can.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Here's a shot inside the cabin, which can fit two Humvees or a light armored vehicle.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

It's also fitted with a glass cockpit, which basically means it has digital displays, for the four-man crew, as well as fourth generation high-efficiency composite rotor blades with swept anhedral tips.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

The Marine Corps hopes to receive about 200 King Stallions.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Lastly, here's a short video of the King Stallion in action.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.