Widgets Magazine
Veterans

Veteran amputee was denied a Six Flags ride — but here's why

Retired Marine Johnny "Joey" Jones, who lost both his legs after stepping on an IED while deployed, was asked to exit a ride at Six Flags Over Georgia; since then, the story has appeared in multiple news outlets and sparked a heated conversation.

The Washington Post reported that Jones was "concerned with the way the park's policy was presented to him" and that "the policy is too restrictive to accommodate people with disabilities."

But there's a good reason for roller coaster parks to be restrictive.


In 2011, U.S. Army Sgt. James Thomas Hackemer was ejected from a ride in a New York theme park and died.

Hackemer had been wounded in 2008 by an armor-penetrating warhead that caused the loss of his left leg and most of his right. He, like Jones, wore prosthetic limbs. After an investigation, a reportedly seven-figure settlement was reached between the lawyers for Darien Lake Theme Park and Resort and Hackemer's family.

Jones didn't see the handicapped sign for the ride when he climbed in with his 8 year-old son — but the ride operator noticed Jones' prosthetics. Jones told The Washington Post that he wasn't upset about being asked to leave the ride, but rather that the employees didn't seem trained to properly accommodate his condition.

According to Fox News, Six Flags issued an apology:

"We apologize to Mr. Jones for any inconvenience; however, to ensure safety, guests with certain disabilities are restricted from riding certain rides and attractions," Six Flags said in a statement to Fox News. "Our accessibility policy includes ride safety guidelines and the requirements of the federal American Disabilities Act. Our policies are customized by ride and developed for the safety of all our guests. Our policies and procedures are reviewed and adjusted on a regular basis to ensure we continue to accommodate the needs of our guests while simultaneously maintaining a safe environment for everyone."

Nonetheless, Jones took to Twitter to call out the park:

In a follow-up Tweet, Jones maintained that this ride didn't truly appear to have a safety policy as much as a liability policy, which is where his argument truly appears to stem from.

He's advocating for fellow amputees and individuals with handicaps so they can feel included — rather than excluded — as they continue to live their lives.