Veterans

5 ways a grunt's resume is more valuable than a POG's

One of the biggest drawbacks of being in the combat arms is a perceived lack of post-service opportunities out here in the civilian world. A recently released grunt might take a look through job listings, see a laundry list of requirements, become convinced that applying is a pointless effort, and send themselves into a downward spiral. We've seen it happen too many times — we all know a brother- or sister-in-arms who has fallen down this hole.

This misconception couldn't be further from the truth. The truth is, there really isn't much of advantage to being a former POG over being former infantry when it comes time to find a job. Unless that guy who was a computer analyst in the Army is specifically going into a civilian computer analyst job, you're both on even footing.

In fact, when you cut away the military jargon from your resume and translate your skills into something a civilian employer can read, the grunts actually have the upper hand, based solely on the day-to-day lifestyle of combat arms troops.


This article isn't meant to discredit a support troop's career path. All troops can pull useful information out of this article, but it's intended mostly for the grunts who don't realize their true potential.

1. Your awards are proof for all the "fluff" in your resume

Let's be honest; everyone is going to add some decorative fluff their resume. Employers expect this and have to weed through said fluff to get the heart of the issue. Even if you don't embellish a little on your resume, prospective employers will assume you're fluffing it up. It's just how these things go.

Typically, grunts don't have awards tossed to them like candy, so when they get one, it means something. So, if you've got it, flaunt it. Go ahead and mention why you were given the award; that's the real impressive part.

It's best if you let your resume do the talking...

(Meme via Valhalla Wear)

2. Your deployment history can solidify your communication skills

Writing about your deployment history is, in a word, complicated. Unfortunately, there's a stigma associated with veterans of combat zones. Some employers unjustly see veterans as unqualified because they assume we all have post-traumatic stress and are difficult to work with — despite the fact that that's discrimination clearly forbidden by the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Still, civilian employers, no matter the industry, are looking for three key traits in an employee: Communication skills, leadership potential, and management ability. There's no question that a deployment checks these three boxes. If you've deployed, then you have a proven ability to "communicate with a team and higher-ups under extremely stressful conditions."

Deployment stories usually do well with civilians who have no idea what life in the military is actually like.

(Meme via Pop Smoke)

3. Your leadership skills are needed for promotion in civilian workplace

Employers want a new hire for one of two reasons: They're either looking to fill a vacancy to complete a specific task or they're trying to bring someone on for the long-haul, someone who will rise within the ranks and remain loyal to the employer.

Support guys, like that Army computer analyst from the earlier example, might be a shoe-in for that one entry-level position, but it's the grunt they'll be looking at for the long-term. Grunts take on leadership roles from the first moment they're assigned a boot private to babysit watch over. What the civilian employer wants to hear is that you "oversaw and aided in the growth of subordinates over the course of several years."

They don't need to know about your salty attitude until you've been on board for several months.

(Meme via CONUS Battle Drills)

4. Your military schooling is tangible proof of management skills

In every complete resume, the final portion is reserved for educational history. Typically, this is where an applicant lists their high school diploma and college degrees, but it's also used for technical schools and any kind of additional education. Good news, grunts: this is also where you put those random schools you were sent to.

Officer Candidate School and NCO Academies definitely count. Put those on there. Plus, most NCO schools are given overly "hooah" names. Go ahead and tell me what sounds better: "Warrior Leader Course" or "Los Angeles City College?"

Civilians won't know that you were volun-told or needed to make rank. It just sounds extremely impressive to the uninformed.

(Meme via The Salty Soldier)

5. Your college degree will cover down on anything else missing on the resume

At the end of the day, your military experience looks good and it makes for a great topic of discussion during the interview, but you can't expect anything more than a foot in the door if you don't meet the required qualifications.

Thankfully, using that GI Bill that you earned can help boost your odds in any field you're pursuing. Once you've finished your degree, the job market is ripe for the picking, and your military service will give you an edge over the competition.

Follow wherever your heart takes you. You'll find someone out there willing to pay you money to do it.

(Meme via Disgruntled Vets)

For further instruction on how to best translate your military history into a fantastic civilian resume, please check out this article by the folks over at Zety. They're professionals who dedicate themselves to this very subject. It's a great read.