Veterans

This is the first veteran nonprofit designed to create insane custom vehicles

If a vehicle is a labeled "military grade" you can assume it was intended to take a beating. Or that it was built by the lowest bidder. If you see something labeled "Warrior Built," know that it was designed and custom-made by a U.S. military combat veteran and probably some of his buddies.


But "Warrior Built" means more than that. It means "built by combat veterans for combat veterans." It means "built with the cover values of honor, courage, and commitment." It means "built with the unrelenting drive to make a difference." And it means "built remembering the warrior ethos learned serving our country."

"Warrior Built" is not just a standard of quality, it's a real organization of veterans, founded by Nick Hamm, a combat-wounded Marine. As a retired First Sergeant, Hamm's last military role was ensuring his people were taken care of. His people now extend beyond his Marines. They're now his fellow veterans.

Warrior Built Founder Nick Hamm.

As a motorcycle enthusiast, he wanted to use the process of building a motorcycle from a handful of parts to an operational vehicle as a means of therapy. It develops vocational skills and brings fellow vets together, rebuilding the camaraderie they lost after leaving the military.

"Everyone possesses leadership traits — it's about pulling those traits out of somebody," says Hamm. "So Warrior Built reaches out to combat veterans. They're all different, so we come together to accomplish the same mission, but we all have different things we bring to the table to accomplish that mission."

Most importantly for the projects, veterans need to muster the imagination required to make a bucket of bolts roadworthy once more. This fuels their energy for other passion projects: dirt bike races, drag racing, off-road racing, concerts, and camping trips to spend time enjoying the fruits of their labor. Above all, vets get a chance to see if working in fabrication and mechanics is their calling.

One combat-wounded Marine named Gio lost an arm in an explosion while deployed. Now he's riding a dirt bike with Warrior Built.

Gio uses an arm attachment to ride a dirt bike, like any other prosthetic.

"I don't put a limit on myself, because there isn't," Gio says. "People look at me like I'm crazy when I get on this bike. I look at them and I say 'you're crazy for not trying it.'"