All sorts of comics have entertained readers without having their protagonist wear spandex and capes. Outside of standard superhero comics, you could pick up a sub-genre called war comics. The recent announcement of Steven Spielberg directing a Blackhawk film based off the DC Comics series attests to the place of war comics in pop culture.


These comics were generally grounded in reality, even if they occasionally had fantastical elements. But the focus was placed on the war and the soldiers who fought in them. With that in mind, these comics would definitely grab the attention of movie-goers.


1. Adventures in the Rifle Brigade

This 2000's mini-series written by Garth Ennis (best known for Preacher and his work on Punisher and Judge Dredd) and art by Carlos Ezquerra was a war comedy about a British commando unit in World War II.

The titular team was an over-the-top caricature of troops in WWII. Just to set the stage for the kind of comic this was, the team's entire goal was to steal Hitler's missing testicle.

That's a hell of a MacGuffin — and one I don't think any film has gone after.

(Adventures in the Rifle Brigade #1 by Vertigo Comics)

2. The War That Time Forgot

The 1924 novel The Land That Time Forgot by Edgar Rice Burrough was a classic tale about the savagery of war and a soldier who must tap into his primordial rage to destroy his enemies...and who also crashed on an island full of dinosaurs.

The adapted comic overlooked all those metaphors and symbolism and nose dove directly into "soldiers fighting dinosaurs" in a goofy action series.

Why? Because why not?

(Star-Spangled War Stories Vol. 1 by DC Comics)

3. Weird War Tales

Another way to mix war films with another genre with a supernatural horror like with Weird War Tales. Each comic was part of an anthology and each focused on one conflict — retold with zombies, vampires, robots, and other monsters. The only reoccurring character was Death, who would introduce each tale.

Think of an entire movie or TV series akin to the "Veteran of Psychic Wars" scene in Heavy Metal.

Frank Miller got his first break into the comic book industry with "Weird War Tales" but his comics like "300," "Sin City," "Dark Knight Returns," and "Daredevil" have all been huge successes.

(Weird War Tales #64 by DC Comics)

4. Our Army at War (featuring Sgt. Rock)

Hands down the most famous of the war comics has still never been touched — even if many have tried in the past. Sgt. Rock was a realistic war story written by Army veteran Bob Kanigher. While other writers would take over Sgt. Rock, the original Kanigher run of the character is regarded as one of the best series of and pioneered the Silver Age of Comics.

Joel Silver of Dark Castle Entertainment has been trying to get a Sgt. Rock film in production for ages now with none other than Bruce Willis cast as Sgt. Rock himself. Both Guy Ritchie and Quentin Tarantino were rumored to direct at some point. Even though it's stuck in development hell, this is still one of the most requested war comic films.

I would watch the hell out of this film.

(Our Army At War featuring Sgt. Rock #297 by DC Comics)