WATM's exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense 'Kilo Two Bravo' - We Are The Mighty
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WATM’s exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense ‘Kilo Two Bravo’

Director Paul Katis sits down for an exclusive interview with We Are The Mighty to discuss the story behind the making of ‘Kilo Two Bravo’, hitting select theaters November 13th and available on iTunes on November 10th!

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The Marine Rapper will make you shake your Citizen Rump

Look, it is easy, and deeply enjoyable, to give Oscar Mike host Ryan Curtis boatloads of crap for the shenanigans and mannerisms (shenannerisms?) he regularly deploys in the line of duty. It’s easy because he’s a good sport. It’s enjoyable because, well:

WATM’s exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense ‘Kilo Two Bravo’


But credit where credit is due, it is no easy thing to drop in on a recording studio unprepared, be played a brand new beat, compose a non-wack verse and then get into the booth and spit your best whiteboy flow in front of a hot producer and a rapper at the top of his game.

And that’s exactly what Curtis had to do when he paid a visit to Louden Beats recording studio to catch up with Raymond Lotts aka TMR aka The Marine Rapper.

Need more TMR? That time Linda Hamilton asked a Marine to the ball

TMR served 10 years in the Middle East as a Marine Corps combat correspondent, ala Joker from Full Metal Jacket. Though he started rapping young, he found he had to put his passion on ice during active duty — no time to think, let alone rhyme.

When he finally left the service, the transition was rough.

“It was a reality shock. I didn’t know where to go. You’re like, ‘I have all this time on my hands,’ and you get to thinking… ‘I was such a super hero in the military, but now I’m just a regular civilian. Nobody cares about me. I’m nothing now. Why should I even live?'”

Finding himself in a dark headspace familiar to many vets exiting the military, TMR did a hard thing: he asked for help.

With the assistance of the VA, he was able to reorient, finding an outlet in his long-dormant passion for rap. He now lives in Hollywood, CA, cutting tracks and shooting music videos to support his budding career as a musician.

And, no joke, in a single day of working together, TMR, producer Louden and the Artist Formerly Known as Ryan Curtis may just have succeeded in dropping the U.S. military’s first ever chart-topping hip hop track:

WATM’s exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense ‘Kilo Two Bravo’
Mic drop. (Go90 Oscar Mike screenshot)

It’s a lock for New Oscar Mike Theme Song at the very least.

Watch as Curtis looks for lyrics in a Magic 8 Ball and TMR proves there’s no room in his game for shame, in the video embedded at the top.

Watch more Oscar Mike:

This Green Beret will make you a mental commando

This Iraq vet kayaker will make you rethink PTSD

This is why the future of motocross is female

This is what happens when a Navy SEAL becomes an actor

This is what happens when a SEAL helps you with your lady problems

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“World War Toons” drops a piano on Nazi troops

Studio Roqovan’s new “World War Toons” video game fights a 20th Century-style war using chicken legs and Kool-Aid-man bombs to break through enemy lines.


Yes, you read that right.

Using the latest in virtual reality technology, “World War Toons” is optimized for the Playstation 4 and its VR headset so players can shoot where they’re looking and bob their heads around like Stevie Wonder at a recording session.

The developers behind the game held a release party near Los Angeles aboard the battleship USS Iowa that featured retro World War II Pinups for Vets models and music by the orchestra that performed the “World War Toons” score.

Not exactly what you’d expect from former “Call of Duty” developers, but “World War Toons” is sure to unleash the slapstick warfighter in gamers everywhere.

The game is set for release Oct. 13.

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This Medal of Honor recipient took care of business at the Super Bowl

Super Bowl LII kicked off with a coin toss — naturally — but this year the NFL added a patriotic element.


This year, 16 Medal of Honor recipients stood on the field, shoulder-to-shoulder, as one of their own took care of business and officially flipped the traditional coin like the operator he is.

After the stadium announcer introduced Marine veteran Hershel Woodrow “Woody” Williams, he gave the crowd a prideful and enthusiastic “thumbs-up.”

While wearing his Marine Corps League Garrison cover, Williams flipped that NFL coin like a seasoned champ; no surprise there — how the former WWII flamethrower earned his network TV spot is an incredible story of heroism and badassery.

Related: This Navy veteran is ‘sleeping over’ at Sunday’s big game

A strong toss, sir. (Image via GIPHY) Before joining the Marine Corps, Williams took part in Civilian Conservation Corps, a public relief program operated by the U.S. Army. After the events at Pearl Harbor, Williams requested his release and quickly enlisted in the Marine Corps so he could get right into the fight.

His unique training earned him a role as a demolition operator — and he would certainly put his skills to good use. In 1945, he was sent to the Japanese island of Iwo Jima to lay siege against the enemy.

Williams served in a reserve unit and he was told he probably wouldn’t even be utilized in the fight, but things changed quickly under the brutal barrage of enemy fire.

Also Read: This sailor has one of the most impressive resumes you’ll ever see — and he’s not done yet

WATM’s exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense ‘Kilo Two Bravo’
Marines clearing enemy caves with grenades and BARs.

After numerous American casualties, Williams was thrust into battle and ordered to engage the Japanese’s well-fortified pill boxes with his deadly flamethrower.

Under the guidance of a Marine officer, he was given a few riflemen for protection as he dashed toward the Japanese stronghold to burn them out of their position.

Due to the enemies’ muzzle smoke, Williams managed to identify their well-concealed positions and light them up.

“It almost like a dream, like it’s really not real,” he recalled.

Williams climbed to the top of the pill box and stuck the barrel of his flamethrower into the small air vent and fired. During his time on the bloody island, Williams single-handedly knocked out seven different concealed enemy positions.

Now Read: This SEAL was shot 27 times before walking himself to the medevac

WATM’s exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense ‘Kilo Two Bravo’

On Oct. 5, 1945, Hershel Woodrow “Woody” Williams was presented with the Medal of Honor by President Truman.

Check out Medal of Honor Book‘s video below to listen to Woody’s incredible story from the legend himself.

(MedalOfHonorBook, YouTube)
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Meet the guy behind this show where a Marine Corps vet fights zombies

Mark Tufo wrote Zombie Fallout, a nine-book series that follows Marine Corps veteran and family man Mike Talbot as he tries to keep his family safe in a world overrun by zombies.


Like the character Talbot, Tufo served in the Marine Corps before returning to civilian life, starting a family, and adopting an English bulldog. The similarities end when Talbot’s neighborhood is taken over by flesh-eating and brain-hunting zombies, forcing him and his family to fight their way out.

Now, Talbot and his family might be getting their own TV series. Brad Thomas, a television producer and fan of the series, has teamed up with Tufo to bring the zombie epic to the masses. WATM got to spend a day with them and some military veteran fans on the set as the crew filmed a teaser for the show.

WATM’s Weston Scott was given the opportunity to interview director Brad Thomas about his journey from fan to producer, a little insider knowledge of Tufo’s creation, and the process of bringing together all of the fan-driven elements to the project.

You can also check out the music video teaser for Zombie Fallout.

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This is where drill instructors come from

Drill Instructor School is tasked with training the Marines that make Marines.


Lasting 11 weeks, the school is considered to be 10 times harder than boot camp. Each training class starts with 60 students, but there is a 15 to 20 percent dropout rate — mostly due to injuries.

Those that complete the grueling process are granted the 0911 MOS, and will go on to serve in one of the most legendary jobs in the U.S. military…as well as the nightmares of more than a few recruits.

Articles

This is why officers should just stay in the office

Army Sgt. David Logan Nye just wanted to do his job during his first combat deployment.


But that’s not how the military works.

WATM’s exclusive interview with Paul Katis, director of the intense ‘Kilo Two Bravo’
Who needs a metal detector when you have hopes and dreams? (Go90 No Sh*t There I Was Screenshot)

Also read: This is why the military shouldn’t completely outlaw hazing

In this episode of No Sh*t There I Was, Nye sets off on a fools-errand with a bunch of high brass and a very stressed out guy charged with detecting IEDs. When they hear a call on the radio that a potential insurgent is fleeing a checkpoint, they take off running to intercept — leaving the metal detector behind.

“Pass the guy protecting us from IEDs…because there are too many probable IEDs on the ground…?” Nye’s inner monologue reflects that of everyone who has ever had to deal with an overly-enthusiastic boss.

Luckily, the rag-tag group of heroes didn’t encounter any IEDs that day, but they did stumble upon something else much more…groovy? Check out the video at the top to see what it was.

Oh, and to my fellow officers out there, let’s try to get in the way of the experts a little less, shall we?

Watch more No Sh*t There I Was:

Why it sucks to report to the ‘Good Idea Fairy’

A Ranger describes what being a ‘towed jumper’ is actually like

Why you should never run through smoke you didn’t throw

Smooth talking your way through gear turn-in is a stinky proposition

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