Here's how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste - We Are The Mighty
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Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste

The 13th century spawned the Mongols of Genghis Khan and their savage ways of war. In this episode of Elite Forces, find out more about the warriors who invented their own special brand of laying waste to enemies.

MIGHTY TRENDING

This is how you train for brotherhood

A lot of important learning about leadership and pecking order and magnanimity toward one’s inferior gets worked out for men in the childhood scrum of fraternal warfare. We learn to take heaps of sh*t and like it. We learn to administer a beat down without leaving incriminating bruises. We learn to distrust a man who can’t engage in a round or two of emasculatory sting-pong without losing his cool.


Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Photo via John Oxley.

Brothers, of course, are fantastic preparation for military service.

Max never had a brother. As a baby he left the cradle for a pre-dawn ruck, lost track of HQ and ended up being raised to manhood by mastodons. Way down range. So, as you can imagine, it can be hard for him to relate to the rest of us, we the sibling-enabled.

Max played Super Mario™ with Cave Bears.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
All fun and games until you make them play Luigi. Photo via Flickr, John Solaro, CC BY-ND 2.0

He played Marco Polo with Casteroides. (That’s a Giant Beaver!)

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
All fun and games until you get an accidental woody. Photo via Flickr, James St. John, CC BY 2.0

He even fought the real Punch-a-saurus Rex and won by KO in Round 5.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
All fun and games until the bout photographer bets on Max.

But he never had a brother. So he joined the Army instead.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
And then Max suddenly had hundreds of brothers. And a bunch of sisters, too. (Go90 Max Your Body screenshot)

Max already knew about taking sh*t from grumpy beasts and holding his own in the Wild Rumpus. He already had plenty of muscle for beating brothers back. What he learned in the Army is that sometimes, it’s the other way. Sometimes, you gotta help your brother out.

In this episode, Max demos some drills for building your brother- helping muscles, the ones that make you good at the fireman’s carry. Make some time for these. And call your brother while you’re at it. Because it can’t all be sting-pong and prehistoric beaver. There’s gotta be some love in there too. And that’s the gospel, according to Max “The Body” Phili-delphia.

Watch as Max gives your laziness a chocolate swirly, in the video embedded at the top.

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Articles

This disabled vet employs wounded warriors at his awesome restaurant

On the streets of Long Beach, California, a new restaurant has opened where a quadriplegic Navy veteran focuses on hiring other disabled people — especially veterans — to staff the business.


Daniel Tapia, the owner of the restaurant 4th and Olive, told Fox LA, “I’m referred to what’s known as a walking quad, a high functioning quadriplegic. So, I can walk and move but I have a limited strength and feeling in my hands and feet.”

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Daniel Tapia is a disabled Navy veteran and co-owner of 4th and Olive. (Photo: YouTube/SupposeWeExpose)

Tapia was a sommelier at another southern California restaurant until he was fired in 2014. Short on employment opportunities and hopeful that he could fight disability discrimination, he decided to launch his own establishment that would provide job opportunities for other disabled veterans.

Some of the vets, like Air Force veteran and bartender John Putnam, are fighting physical battles, but the restaurant also hires people with PTSD and traumatic brain injuries.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
John Putnam is a disabled Air Force veteran who now works as a bartender at 4th and Olive. (Photo: YouTube/SupposeWeExpose)

Co-owner and chef Alex McGroarty told Fox that the veterans are great employees.

“They work really hard,” he said. “If they’ve had a little trouble in the past, they are going to be really loyal and work hard for you.”

“By and large, it’s been a great process hiring these vets, and we can’t wait to hire more,” Tapia said in a recent YouTube video.

4th and Olive is located in Long Beach, California and serves food from the Alsace region of France.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pZONuhGZmE
Articles

America and Japan could use giant robots in their next war

Anyone who has watched a lot of Japanese anime knows that giant robots are a major theme. Heck, the first four “Transformers” films have netted almost $3.8 billion at the box office since making their debut in 2007. In August, American and Japanese robots will go head-to-head in real life – and we could be seeing some of the classic military sci-fi coming to life.


Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
We’ve seen Optimus Prime engage in some giant-robot fighting on the big screen, but in real life, Megabot Mk III and KURATAS will go head-to-head this summer. (Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

According to a report by FoxNews.com, the American company Megabots issued the challenge to the Japanese robotics firm Suidobashi in 2015 after Megabots had completed the 15-foot tall, six-ton Megabot Mark II. The Japanese company accepted the challenge, but insisted that hand-to-hand combat be allowed before agreeing to commit their battle bot, KURATAS.

Megabots then spent two years re-designing its robot warrior to address the changed dynamics of the duel. They also needed to be able to transport the robot inside a standard shipping container. That meant the company had to be able to quickly deploy the Megabot Mark III — a 16-foot tall, 12-ton behemoth — from an air transportable configuration. That’s not an easy task when you consider there are 3,000 wires, 26 hydraulic pumps, and 300 hydraulic hoses to bolt into place.

Plus, the robot’s 430-horsepower engine was originally designed to move a car, not power a piloted robot in a duel to the death – of the robot, that is.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
KURATAS, Suidobashi’s giant fighting robot. (Youtube screenshot)

“When we show our robot to people who haven’t heard of us, the reaction is always ‘Oh! I saw that in…’ and then they list any of 60 or 70 different video games, movies, [or] animated shows that feature giant robots fighting. We’re trying to bring the fantasies of sci-fi fans around the world to life,” Megabots co-founder and CEO Gui Cavalcanti said.

Which robot will emerge victorious, and which one will turn into scrap? We’ll find out this summer. Will we eventually see these robots in the military? Don’t bet against it. Meanwhile, watch the challenge Megabots issued to Suidobashi.

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WATCH: Australian Army soldiers are pretty smart

The Australian Army has found a fairly ingenious way of helping machine gunners hold their weapons steady. Gunners need to be able to do this while standing, and sometimes that can be easier said than done. The Australian Army has come up with a great solution. It’s called the Reaper and it looks pretty rad. The Reaper Weapon Support System (RWS) is a backpack that gunners can wear. It helps redistribute some of the weight from the machine gun across the gunner’s back. That makes it easier to stand, easier to fire, and easier to stay alive. 

Ask any gunner what it feels like after a day in the field and they’ll tell you they’re tired. Especially after a long ruck or a never-ending FTX, the last thing a gunner wants to worry about is how to properly fire. The Australian Army uses the RWS to help its soldiers get in more firing practice. And it helps them save reserves and energy for when they really need it. The Reaper helps them get more rounds on target and reduce how far their barrels wander due to flagging arm strength.

The Australian Army has been around since 1901. Some of the colonial forces were officially united in 1903. Since then, the Australian Army has shifted to meet the needs of the country. It has participated in both World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Gulf War. Unit 1916, it was known as the Australian Military Forces. Now it’s officially called the Australian Army. Inventions like the Reaper show that the leadership of the Army is consistently looking for ways to improve the lives of those who are risking theirs for the country’s freedoms. 

The Reaper definitely looks pretty sweet sticking over their back like a scorpion’s tail. 

Articles

The next Navy sub could be built with 3D printing

Today it costs the U.S. Navy about $2.6 billion and just under 2.5 years to build a Virginia-class sub. But a joint endeavor by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense could greatly reduce those costs going forward.


According to a video by Business Insider, the joint project involves using a 3D printer to hake the hull of a mini-submarine.

3D printing has been around for a while – and in 2015, a Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado flew with parts that had been made that way. But this latest effort takes things to a whole new level. It also hit the news when Defense Distributed released plans for 3D-printed firearms.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Members of SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team Two (SDVT-2) prepare to launch one of the team’s SEAL Delivery Vehicles (SDV) from the back of the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Philadelphia (SSN 690) on a training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Photographer’s Mate Andrew McKaskle (RELEASED)

The mini-submarine in the video appears to be very similar to SEAL Delivery Vehicles. These are used to help SEAL infiltrate in and out. Normally these hulls cost about $800,000 to make over a period of months, but 3D printing can reduce the cost by 90 percent and create the hull in a matter of weeks.

The logistical advantages for 3D printing are also significant – offering the ability to custom-design needed parts. That saves time in getting a plane or vehicle back into the fight, and that time could save lives.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
3D Printing. Photo by Jonathan Juursema.

One prototype has been built, and a second is planned. They will be tested by the Navy.

If all goes well, these printed SDVs could be in service by 2019. To see more about this, watch the video below.

Articles

This is how the Roman Empire structured its military

The Roman Empire had one of the best militaries of ancient times. It steamrolled over the Carthaginians, Greeks, Egyptians, Gauls, more than held their own against many other forces for centuries.


So, how did the world’s most powerful government organize its deadly legions? Well, it started with a group of eight men known as a contubernium – which was a little smaller than a typical infantry squad (usually nine personnel). Ten contuberniums, plus the command staff, formed a century of 85 men.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Some of the specialist roles that were usually filled by auxiliaries. (Youtube Screenshot)

Six centuries – about 540 men – made up a cohort. This unit was roughly the size of a present-day infantry battalion. Ten cohorts, plus attachments including a force of cavalry, made a legion of about 6,000 men, roughly the size of a brigade.

The legions were the largest force in the Roman military. Only citizens could serve in the legions but the Roman military also had cohorts of auxiliaries which allowed non-citzens to serve in the Roman army.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste

These auxiliaries were usually slingers, archers, and additional cavalry. Many Roman citizens, who had to provide their own equipment, served as infantry.

After 25 years of service in the Roman army, legionnaires and auxiliaries could look forward to a generous retirement. Those who weren’t citizens gained Roman citizenship and all that meant, plus a plot of land and a generous retirement bonus.

ISO Design, YouTube

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This is how squats can open doors for you

As an artist, Jim Morrison was obsessed with the barriers that exist in our own minds between what we know and the mysteries hidden just beyond. By means of artistic expression, philosophical musing, and a wide variety of mind-altering drugs, he spent his short, bright tenure as a rockstar searching for the breach points in those barriers: the famous “Doors of Perception.”

And that is why The Doors are called The Doors and not The San Fran Drug Lovin’ Band. True story.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste

As a veteran trainer and WATM in-house ruckstar, Max Philisaire is likewise obsessed with the Doors of Perception, but rather than approaching the breaching issue as a question of which weed strain to choose, Max would prefer that you simply squat so hard that the doors implode.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
For the record, Max is only squatting hard enough here to ruffle the drapes. (Go90 Max Your Body screenshot)

Because this is Max. Max’s front door doesn’t have a mat, it has a moat. Max’s doorbell is a grip test. His mail slot is a bazooka. Max hopes Weakness tries knocking, so he can breach his own door outward and sick himself on the whole Weakness sales force.

In this episode, Max is out to rock the socks right off your under-developed legs. Breaching doors is a key skill in modern urban combat and Max wants your quads, hamstrings and glutes to be up to the task. You will proceed through a progression of squat drills designed to send your legs a message, a message that reads: Ten hut, ham hocks!”

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
**1-up** Boop boop bee do do do. (Go90 Max Your Body screenshot)

Oh. But if you’re thinking of knocking on Max’s door to thank him?

Watch out for the mail slot.

Watch as Max sneezes and the gym falls over, in the video embedded at the top.

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“World War Toons” drops a piano on Nazi troops

Studio Roqovan’s new “World War Toons” video game fights a 20th Century-style war using chicken legs and Kool-Aid-man bombs to break through enemy lines.


Yes, you read that right.

Using the latest in virtual reality technology, “World War Toons” is optimized for the Playstation 4 and its VR headset so players can shoot where they’re looking and bob their heads around like Stevie Wonder at a recording session.

The developers behind the game held a release party near Los Angeles aboard the battleship USS Iowa that featured retro World War II Pinups for Vets models and music by the orchestra that performed the “World War Toons” score.

Not exactly what you’d expect from former “Call of Duty” developers, but “World War Toons” is sure to unleash the slapstick warfighter in gamers everywhere.

The game is set for release Oct. 13.

WATCH

USAF airmen take on the role of Santa for ‘Operation Christmas Drop’

Every December for the past 65 years, a crew of USAF airmen plays Santa Claus for more than 2,000 people living on remote Pacific islands.


Operation Christmas Drop brings critical supplies to more than 56 islands, with 40,000 pounds of supplies donated by service members and their families in the Pentagon’s longest-running humanitarian airlift operation.

Merry Christmas from We Are The Mighty!

Articles

Video shows Chinese and Indian troops throwing rocks at each other on the border

Indian and Chinese troops clashed in a melee high in the western Himalayas on Aug. 15, adding to simmering tensions along the two countries’ shared border.


Chinese troops reportedly tried to enter Indian territory twice that day, according to an Indian defense official.

They were pushed back both times but threw stones at Indian troops during the exchange, which took place near Pangong Lake, a tourist attraction in the mountain region of Ladakh.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Pangong Lake. Image from Wikimedia Commons.

“There was a minor incident. There was some stone pelting from the Chinese side but the situation was quickly brought under control,” the official told AFP.

The early-morning confrontation lasted about 30 minutes and was resolved after both sides conducted banner drills and retreated to their respective outposts.

Indian media outlet The Print obtained footage of the incident, which took place just yards from the shoreline. Both sides reported injuries.

 

 

The lake — of which India claims about one-third and China the rest — is more than 13,000 feet high on the Tibetan plateau and lies in the northern Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, at the eastern extent of China and India’s 2,175-mile mountain border.

A police official in the state said that confrontations along the de facto border, called the Line of Actual Control, were relatively common.

“These things happen every summer, but this one was slightly prolonged and more serious but no weapons were used,” a police source in the state capital, Srinagar, told AFP.

 

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Image courtesy of Google Maps

The clash took place on India’s independence day, and an early assessment by Indian intelligence sources called the encounter “not at all unusual” due to the “non-delineation” of the border in the area. Indian and Chinese patrols have crossed into areas claimed by the other in the past; more than 300 such crossings have been reported through mid-August this year.

But the confrontation comes two months into a dispute between China and India near their shared border with Bhutan in the eastern Himalayas, and, the assessment added, the “use of force appears to be part of a considered design.”

“Use of stones unprecedented and unusual. Appears to be deliberate attempt to provoke and heighten tension without use of lethal weapons,” the assessment said. Steel bars and rifle butts were also used during the tussle.

On August 16, a previously scheduled border-personnel meeting was held between brigadier-rank officers from the Indian and Chinese armies. (Such meetings are usually held between colonel-rank officers).

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Soldiers with the People’s Liberation Army at Shenyang training base in China, March 24, 2007. DoD photo by Staff Sgt. D. Myles Cullen, US Air Force.

But China’s People’s Liberation Army also declined an invitation to take part in ceremonial meetings on the border to mark India’s independence day this year — the first time the joint meetings haven’t been held since 2005, according to The Express. Another meeting usually held on the Chinese side of the border on August 1 was not held this year.

The contentious but nonviolent confrontation in the Doklam territory — known as Donglang in Chinese — near the two countries’ border with Bhutan started in mid-June, when New Delhi dispatched troops to stop Chinese construction of a road in the area, which is claimed by both China and Bhutan.

India viewed the construction as a threat because it brought Chinese personnel close to the “chicken’s neck” that connects India’s northeast territory to the rest of the country.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Indian Army’s Para Special Forces. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

An Indian official said New Delhi had no choice but to act, as Chinese activity had come too close for comfort. New Delhi has also said both sides should withdraw their forces before any proper negotiation.

Beijing — which has said India is massing troops and building roads in its territory east of Doklam — has said India has no role to play in the region and that Indian personnel illegally crossed into Chinese territory. It has repeatedly asked for their unilateral withdrawal.

Chinese state media has warned India of a fate worse than its decisive defeat during a month-long border war in 1962 in India’s northeast Arunachal Pradesh state.

Chinese officials later admitted the war was launched to teach a lesson to India, which had granted asylum to the Dalai Lama and criticized China’s occupation of Tibet.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Marines of the People’s Liberation Army. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

The 1962 war was brief in duration, but the political concerns that sparked it remain.

The Indian intelligence assessment issued in the hours after the August 15 incident said the skirmish at Pangong Lake could be related to the standoff in the eastern Himalayas.

“Both nations recognize that there are big differences in perception about the Line of Actual Control, but these have been managed well and troops have quickly gone back to the respective positions,” Ashok K. Kantha, former Indian ambassador to China, wrote for The Print, noting that calm along the border has endured despite past incidents.

“Ensuring that these old modalities hold is extremely important,” he added. “The alternative is not good.”

Articles

Watch USMC footage of artillery strikes on ISIS in Syria

US Marines have been on the ground in Syria since March, when a detachment from an amphibious task force arrived in the country, where they joined US special-operations forces to support US partner forces.


The Marine units deployed to Syria included elements of an artillery battery that can fire 155-millimeter shells from M777 Howitzers.

The military has already released footage and photos of Marines in Syria firing their howitzers in support of local coalition partners during their advance on Raqqa, ISIS’ self-declared capital in northwest Syria.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste

“The Marines have been conducting 24-hour all-weather fire support for the Coalition’s local partners, the Syrian Democratic Forces,” the Defense Department said at the time that footage was released.

During the first week of July, the US military released the first footage of Marine artillery units striking an ISIS target on May 14, destroying what the Defense Department called an ISIS artillery position in support of Syrian Democratic Forces.

The M777 howitzer has a range of 15 to 25 miles, and the artillery units in Syria have moved at least once to support the ongoing fight against ISIS there, Marine Commandant Gen. Robert Neller told Military.com in April.
“The fight evolves, so they’re moving to where they can best provide support based on the capability of the weapons system,” Neller said. “The commanders there understand the capability, and they’ll reposition them as required in order to provide the fire support and other effects they need to do to make the campaign successful, ultimately.”

Marine artillery units previously deployed to Iraq to support the fight against ISIS there were set up in a fixed position — though they came under fire just hours into their deployment in March 2016.

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
The 26th Secretary of Defense, James Mattis, is greeted on his first full day in the position by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., in Arlington, VA, Jan. 21, 2017. (DoD photo by D. Myles Cullen.)

US forces in Syria are aiding local partner forces in what Defense Secretary James Mattis has called an “annihilation campaign,” seeking to surround and destroy ISIS fighters — foreign fighters in particular — “so we don’t simply transplant this problem from one location to another,” Mattis told reporters in May.

Mattis “asked me and the military chain-of-command to make a conscious effort not to allow ISIS fighters to just flee from one location to another,” Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told Defense News in June.

“Our commanders on the ground have tried to meet that goal of annihilating the enemy in order to mitigate the risk of these terrorists showing up someplace else.”

Here’s how Genghis Khan developed his own special brand of laying waste
Marines with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit fire their M777 Howitzer during a fire mission in northern Syria as part of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve. (USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Zachery Laning)

Fighting to retake Raqqa has already begun, and over 2,000 ISIS militants are thought to remain there.

US special-operations forces are already working with Arab and Kurdish partners to vet and train a force to secure the city during and after the effort to oust ISIS. Questions remain about how Raqqa and the surrounding area will be secured, as well as about how territory wrested from ISIS around Syria will be divided among the various factions operating in the country.

The US-led coalition and its partner forces have already come into conflict with Syrian pro-regime forces, which are backed by Iran and Russia. Southeast Syria near the Iraqi and Jordanian borders has been a flashpoint for these confrontations, though a local ceasefire has recently gone into effect there.

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