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The real reason North Korea stopped talking to the US

Kim Jong Un didn't like the art of President Trump's deal, according to a recent AP story. The second meeting between the two powers in Vietnam was much less of a bromance than the first meeting, held in Singapore. While the Singapore Summit left many feeling optimistic about the chances of a nuke-free Korean Peninsula, the Hanoi Summit ended almost as abruptly as it began.


While North Korea's early, unplanned exit from Hanoi didn't rule out a third meeting between Trump and Kim, it left many wondering what happened behind the scenes to end the summit so quickly. Simply put, Kim wasn't prepared for the Art of the Deal.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi.

Although the summit lasted for nearly the expected time, talks broke down before the summit's working lunch and a planned "signing ceremony." President Trump told reporters that Kim's demand for an immediate end to all sanctions against North Korea was cause enough for the President to walk away. Trump whose reputation is built on his ability to negotiate, even writing a number of books on dealmaking.

"Sometimes you have to walk," Trump said during a news conference after the summit. "This was just one of those times." Insiders told the AP the President implored Kim to "go all in," referring to the complete dismantling of nuclear development sites not just the disputed one at Yongbyon. For his part, Kim wanted the President to go all in, demanding an end to the sanctions.

Trump wasn't willing to go that far. But there was more to the decision to end the talks there than just this current impasse.

The Art of No Deal, by Kim Jong Un.

(KCNA)

Kim Jong Un just didn't like the "unreasonable demands" Trump made of him, despite a close, personal relationship with the President, one Trump himself affirmed to Western media. So this snafu in Hanoi doesn't mean the negotiations are over forever. Neither side has ruled out a third summit between them.

"We of course place importance on resolving problems through dialogue and negotiations. But the U.S. style dialogue of unilaterally pushing its demands doesn't fit us, and we have no interest in it," Kim said during a speech to North Korea's parliamentary body. The dictator went on to demand reasonable terms for a real agreement and to have them from the United States by the end of 2019.

Those terms include a withdrawal of the "hostile policies" the United States has imposed on North Korea's economy, government, and its individual officials. North Korea has time and again implored South Korea to move away from Washington's aggressive policies toward the North and deal with Pyongyang more unilaterally. In the interim, Kim has resisted complete disarmament, opting instead to join vague declarations of arms control efforts amid cooperation with the South.

"If the United States approaches us with the right manner and offers to hold a third North Korea-U.S. leaders' summit on the condition of finding solutions we could mutually accept, then we do have a willingness to give it one more try," Kim said.