MIGHTY MOVIES

6 things military veterans will love about History's 'Six'

The second season of History's Six is underway and there are a few new faces. Olivia Munn joins the cast as CIA officer Gina Cline. Walton Goggins returns as Richard "Rip" Taggart, who was dramatically rescued in the last season. Led by Barry Sloans' Joe "Bear" Graves, the team will hit Eastern Europe (even as far as Chechnya) this season to track down a terror network.

Veterans are hard to please when it comes to depicting military life and veterans onscreen. We demand accuracy. We demand realism. Most of the time, we find ourselves disappointed. History's Six will not disappoint you.

Suspend your disbelief for a moment, fellow veterans. To be perfectly fair, there's a lot to like and a lot to overlook when it comes to Six — just like any other show on television. Not everyone is going to be a fan. But there is so much more to like from Six. Even the most discerning veteran will find that Six is better than they expected.


1. The realism is relative — and that's okay

This is something vets have a hard time getting over. Every veteran knows Hollywood gets a lot wrong about the military. There are some egregious examples out there. Some of those make it look like they don't even try — looking at you, Basic. There are some in which the producers take a few too many liberties for dramatic license, like Jarhead. Despite solid source material, there were just a few things that would never happen in the Marine Corps.

If you're an NCO who actually fired an M60-E3 in the air with your shirt off while surrounded by hundreds of Marines at a bonfire, I apologize.

A lot of the screen gems that veterans love are, in some way, dramatized or unrealistic. Full Metal Jacket is an anti-war movie, but vets embraced it as their own, whether they supported the Vietnam War or not. Heartbreak Ridge has little to do with the realistic Marine Corps, beyond the depiction of U.S. forces dialing in artillery support on Grenada using a credit card. So lighten up, Francis.

2. "Ripped from the headlines" stories

Last season, the show took on Boko Haram, the Sub-Saharan terror organization that was behind the Chibok School Girls Kidnapping (of "Bring Back Our Girls" infamy). The group continues its kidnapping and terror reign in the country to this day. One the show, the SEAL team's leader was kidnapped by Boko Haram and they spent the season dealing with the aftermath and rescue of Walton Goggins' character "Rip."

You might learn something.

This season takes the team to Eastern Europe to track a clandestine jihadist cell led by a mysterious figure known as "Michael." If you haven't been paying attention to the news, Eastern Europe is the front line to a new Cold War, where Russian and American intelligence agencies work to take down terrorist organizations like ISIS and a resurgent al-Qaeda. Russian security services have been fighting this battle for years. It was only a matter of time before American special operators got involved.

3. Olivia Munn's character is a great addition

Look, I actually heard someone say, "SEAL Teams don't have women." And they don't. Not yet. History isn't depicting a female SEAL — she's a CIA operative and there are many, many female CIA operatives in the real world. History's SEAL Team Six is getting their "Maya."

That's a Zero Dark Thirty reference, y'all. And If you didn't know, the real-life 'Maya' is so hardcore she makes you look squeamish. All of you.

4. The cast were trained by SEALs

Remember that realism thing we were talking about? You are guaranteed to see some outstanding trigger discipline in the cast of Six. Actors Barry Sloane, Kyle Schmid, Edwin Hodge, Juan Pablo Raba, and the rest of the cast went through their own boot camp run by actual Navy SEALs.

In case you didn't know, this is what a Navy SEAL looks like (but we don't know if it was Jocko Willink who trained them).

The cast of Saving Private Ryan had to go through Capt. Dale Dye's bootcamp just once, so you might think the cast of Six would only have to do it once, too. Nope. They're going for every freaking season.

5. It's about family

Most shows, at their cores, are about some kind of family. But what Six does well is that infuses the family drama that comes with being in a tight-knit family unit. Some media outlet somewhere said it was like a "soap opera," but anyone who's ever been in a large family — or a large military workcenterknows that routinely going to work with people you live with is a soap opera in itself.

Imagine all the stupid fights you had with a sibling. Now imagine deploying with them. See what I mean?

6. Action shows are awesome – when done well

I love a good action movie or TV show. I hate a bad one. There's nothing worse than watching bad lines being read by some marginal actor only to be rewarded by thirty seconds of action maybe every twenty minutes (if you're lucky). Go watch a recent Steven Seagal movie on Netflix and tell me I'm wrong.

The action in Six is really well-executed, the cast is pretty great, and the visuals are well-done, too.

Season two just started. You have plenty of time to catch up.