In 1942, the government purchased some land in beautiful Southern California from a private owner for $4,239,062. The property was soon named in honor of Maj. Gen. Joseph H. Pendleton for his outstanding service. Thus, Camp Pendleton was born.

Several years later, Camp Pendleton became the home of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, countless brave service members, and their families.


Maj. Gen. Joseph H. Pendleton

Known for its beautiful beaches and sprawling landscape, there are a few drawbacks to getting stationed on the historic grounds...

1. It's a huge military town outside the gates

Marines and their families typically live just outside the gates and you'll see them while out on liberty — they're everywhere. So, good luck dating someone who isn't attached to the military somehow. You'll have to drive an hour or so before you leave the true confines of the camp.

The camp encompasses more than 125,000 acres and houses thousands of Marines inside. Now, step outside the camp's gates, and it still feels like you've never left.

If you get stationed in Camp Pendleton and think you'll somehow be an individual — you won't.

It's harsh, but true.

2. Seeing paradise nearby is torture

Occasionally, when you're out in the field training, you'll see a beautiful beach and a bunch of civilians out there enjoying themselves. You'll wish it was you.

But no, you're stuck mining a post pretending to be deployed in Afghanistan for the next 72 hours.

Oh, we know that.

3. The infantry is in the middle of nowhere

If you're stationed in the Division aspect of the camp and you need to head over to main side to the large PX, you're going to have to get in a car and drive at least 20 to 25 minutes.

Now, if you don't have a car, then your options are limited. Good luck getting someone to take you all the way over there — it's mission.

You're all alone.

4. Hiking those freaking hills, man

The hills of Camp Pendleton are famous throughout the Corps. 1st. Sgt's. Hill in San Mateo (62 Area) is one of the most notorious natural obstacles over which Marines will climb to either visit the Sangin Memorial or to get that daily PT.

Compared to flat landscape of Camp Lejeune, the hills of Camp Pendleton can be a huge pain in the ass.