MIGHTY MOVIES
Cameron LeBlanc

Disney finally gets permits to start building Marvel Land

The only thing surprising about the closure of A Bug's Land — a section of Disneyland dedicated to the eminently forgettable Pixar effort A Bug's Life — was that it existed in the first place. And now, walls labeled "Stark Industries" have gone up around where Heimlich's Chew Chew Train – amazingly the real name of a real ride — used to run.

The reference to Tony Stark's company suggests that what's been suspected since Disney bought Marvel Entertainment in 2009 is finally happening: a Marvel Land. A series of construction permits filed at Anaheim City Hall further supports this theory while revealing some details about what Disney has in store for Marvel Land.

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MIGHTY TRENDING
USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs

US aircraft carrier and Japanese warships sail together in South China Sea

The Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) participated in a cooperative deployment with Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships JS Izumo (DH-183), JS Murasame (DD-101) and JS Akebono (DD-108) June 10-12, 2019.

Reagan, Akebono, Izumo and Murasame conducted communication checks, tactical maneuvering drills and liaison officer exchanges designed to address common maritime security priorities and enhance interoperability at sea.

"Having a Japanese liaison officer aboard to coordinate our underway operations has been beneficial and efficient," said Lt. Mike Malakowsky, a tactical actions officer aboard Ronald Reagan.

"As we continue to operate together with the JMSDF, it makes us a cohesive unit. They are an integral part of our Strike Group that doubles our capability to respond to any situation."

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The US plan to survive a Soviet nuke was absolutely bonkers

For starters, they were going to bury everyone in large trenches, unless of course, they could cram everyone into concrete tubes and then bury those. There were no real plans for sanitation, for food, for water, medical care, further evacuation, shelter, or really anything else. But hey, they did create a cool turtle cartoon.

A sudden flash. A mushroom cloud. A sudden expanding pressure wave. In the event of a thermonuclear attack, seeing these things means its probably too late to survive. So the U.S. developed warning systems to give Americans a heads up before the bombs landed. But that begs the question: What do you do if you have just an hour or so until your city blows up?

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Watch the adorable way military working dogs retire

Military working dogs serve around the world by protecting both troops and installations. But when they've completed their tour of duty, the dogs are discharged from the military, often with medals pinned to their collars. Here's the video of two Belgian Malinois retiring from Fort Benning.

Military working dogs go through lives of intense national service, trained from near birth to mind human commands and either fight bad guys or hunt for dangerous substances and contraband. But they're still living creatures, and they are allowed to retire and live out their days after their service is done.

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B-52 bomber takes flight with hypersonic weapon for the first time

America's longest-serving bomber just took flight with a new air-launched hypersonic weapon for the first time, the US Air Force announced on June 13, 2019.

A B-52 Stratofortress heavy long-range bomber took to the skies over Edwards Air Force Base in California on June 12, 2019, with an inactive, sensor-only prototype of the new AGM-183A Air Launched Rapid Response Weapon (ARRW), one of a handful of hypersonic weapons the Air Force is developing for the B-52s.

Hypersonic weapons are a key research and development area in the ongoing arms race between the great-power rivals Russia, China, and the US. Hypersonics are particularly deadly because of their high speeds, in excess of Mach 5, and their maneuverability, which gives them the ability to evade enemy air-and-missile defense systems.

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Star Trek's 'Kobayashi Maru' test is a must for military leaders

Over the years, the varied iterations of the Star Trek franchise have inspired countless young men and women to pursue careers in cutting edge technologies, space sciences, and the like. As a kid growing up on a steady diet of "Star Trek: The Next Generation," however, I saw something else that spoke to me: a command structure that each and every crewmember had the utmost faith in.

The crew of the Enterprise each knew where they fell within the decision-making hierarchy, what their role and responsibilities were, and most importantly, who to look to when it came time to make hard decisions.

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North Korea accidentally burned a photographer alive during a missile test

There's a saying in the photography community, first coined by the legendary Robert Capa: "if your photos aren't good enough, you're not close enough." If that's true, there's one North Korean photog who has the world's best photo of a rocket launch. Sadly, no one will ever see it because the photo was burned up along with the man who took it.

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'Catch-22' is the war miniseries that still feels relevant

It's based on a 58-year-old novel about a war that ended 74 years ago, but the Catch-22 miniseries is filled with moments that will resonate, comically and tragically, with any combat veteran today. From the young sergeant proposing marriage to his favorite prostitute, to the kid who dies before he can unpack his bags, it's a hell of a story.

Catch-22 was written six decades ago by World War II veteran Joseph Heller, but change the B-25s to CH-47s and make the sands of Pianosa (an Italian island) the sands of Afghanistan, Iraq, or Kuwait, and all the characters and most of the plots would fit right in.

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The 13 funniest military memes for the week of June 14th

The higher-ups at the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Carson instituted a new ban on the sale of alcohol past 2200. It's going to be put in place on Monday, June 17, so this will be the last weekend troops there can buy liquor through AAFES until 0800.

On one hand, I totally understand the frustration. Which soldier hasn't run out of beer at midnight and needed to stumble to the Class Six to pick up another six-pack? That's part of the whole "Lower Enlisted" experience. On the other hand, I get why. It's a reactionary step that the chain of command took in response to the rise in alcohol-related incidents while not outright banning alcohol in the first place.

There's an easy workaround, and it's probably one the chain of command might already know and actually prefer. Just stockpile all the booze in the barracks room. Think about it. If all the booze is in one place, there's no safer place for a young soldier to get sh*tfaced drunk. A few steps away from their bed, there's an NCO within shouting distance at the CQ desk, usually the unit medic is nearby, and any alcohol-related issues can be handled within house.

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