This was the first military helicopter rescue ever

It wasn't in Vietnam, or even Korea. During World War II, U.S. Army Air Forces' 1st Lt. Carter Harman flew an experimental Vought-Sikorsky helicopter from India to northern Burma where, despite challenging weather and engine failure, he shuttled four wounded and sick men out of the jungle to safety.

The incredible stand of the Irish Army in the Congo

In September 1961, the Irish Army under the United Nations flag was engaged in operations against Katanga, a breakaway region in Congo. Some 155 Irish troops were stationed at a little base near Jadotville in order to protect the citizens of the small mining town. But the locals in Jadotville wanted nothing to do with the Irish, believing the U.N. had taken sides in the conflict between the Congolese government and Katanga.

For five days, the 155 Irish fought for their lives against as many as 4,000 mercenaries and rebels who tried to take them captive.

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Spc. Joseph Knoch

Guard teams up with Hungarian forces in successful live-fire exercise

National Guard units joined with the U.S. Army and Hungarian Defense Forces (HDF), who partnered for a live-fire training exercise as a part of Breakthrough 2019 in June.

Breakthrough 2019 aims to identify the capabilities and limitations of the U.S. Army and HDF on a tactical level while in theater. During the exercise, firing systems are tested to demonstrate multi-echelon interoperability between both the U.S. and Hungarian military forces. This provides an opportunity to observe the synchronization and execution of both manned and digital firing upon specified targets within a tactical environment.

"We are grateful to our strong NATO ally Hungary for hosting this outstanding training event," said Lt. Gen. Christopher Cavoli, commander, U.S. Army Europe." We appreciate the coordination and planning conducted by all of our allies and partners in the Balkan peninsula that ensured the success of this exercise."

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MIGHTY CULTURE
Richard Rice

After 45 years, Green Beret faces his past in Vietnam — part three

The one thing that seems to be a constant in Saigon is the delicious smell of food cooking – from the street vendors, open air cafes, coffee shops, and bakeries – it was that way in the late 60's and remains so today. The first time I came to the city I remember walking to the headquarters with an officer I'd served with in Ban Me Thuot and stopping at a small coffee shop for a coffee and croissant – both were delicious and the whole event seemed surreal given what was going on in the rest of the country at the time.

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Exciting new technology improves veteran access to emergency care

Emergency stroke care for veterans continues to improve thanks to the expansion of VA's National Telestroke Program, one of the first nationwide telestroke programs in the world.

The program was launched in 2017 to improve veteran access to stroke specialists.

"In just two short years, the VA National Telestroke Program has grown to provide acute stroke services in over 30 VA medical centers from coast to coast," said Dr. Glenn Graham, VHA Deputy National Director of Neurology. "We've built an extraordinary team of over 20 stroke neurologists across the United States, united in their passion to improve the care of veterans in the first hours after stroke.

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The Pentagon has plans for its own mini-space station. Here's what it would do

Among defense experts the world over, there's little doubt that warfare in the 21st century will be an orbital affair. From communications and reconnaissance to navigation and logistics, you'll be hard-pressed to find an element of any modern nation's military that operates without the use of space-born satellites, and as such, many nations are developing weapons aimed specifically at causing trouble high above our heads.

While the U.S. government may be no exception, as the reigning space-race champ, America has the lead, and as such, much more to lose in orbit than its national competitors. At least one element of the Pentagon has a plan to help keep it that way: an orbiting space station purpose-built to support a fleet of defensive space drones.

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MIGHTY MOVIES
Cameron LeBlanc

Here's what you can expect from phase 4 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

There's every sign that Marvel isn't resting on its laurels after the global domination of "Avengers: Endgame," but that doesn't mean that the fifth Avengers movie is coming any time soon.

In Hall H at San Diego Comic-Con, Kevin Feige laid out the films and TV series that will make up phase 4 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The first, "Black Widow," will hit theaters on May 1, 2020 while the last, "Thor 4: Love and Thunder" has a release date of Nov. 5, 2021. An Avengers movie was not among the titles announced.

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This is what happened to all the old US F-14 Tomcats

There was only one foreign customer for the advanced F-14 Tomcat fighter during its heyday: Iran. The Shah chose to buy 80 Tomcats instead of the F-15 Eagle – and it was a good investment. Even after Imperial Iran gave way to the Islamic Republic of Iran after the 1979 revolution, the Iranian Air Force was still stacked with some of the best Tomcat pilots in the world.

And the U.S. doesn't want any of them in the air again ever.

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This is the rifle Confederates used to snipe Union officers

Many a Union officer fell victim to a .451-caliber bullet designed for this English-built rifle. A muzzle-loaded, single-shot rifle, the Whitworth was the first of its kind and changed warfare for the next century and more. It was the world's first sniper rifle, and Confederate sharpshooters loved it.

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This is why spears are the most common historical weapon ever

There's a very good reason why you can find spears in the history of every civilization and tribe on Earth. It's not just because they're simple, be it a common pointy stick or an elaborately engineered and weighted one. And it's not only because they were relatively cheap, compared to other weapons that could be mass-produced at the time.

No, spears were everywhere because spears work.

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