Green Berets who avenged 9/11 on horseback will recreate legendary WWII jump

Before D-Day, on June 5, 1944, some 90 teams of two to four men parachuted into Nazi-occupied France. They were members of the Office of Strategic Services, the predecessors of both the CIA and the modern-day Army Special Forces. These OSS teams were called "Jedburgh" teams and were highly skilled in European languages, parachuting, amphibious operations, skiing, mountain climbing, radio operations, Morse code, small arms, navigation, hand-to-hand combat, explosives, and espionage. They would need all of it.

The OSS teams' job was to link up with resistance fighters in France, Belgium, and the Netherlands to coordinate Allied airdrops, conduct sabotage operations, and roll out the red carpet for the Allied advance into Germany. D-Day was to be the "Jeds'" trial by fire.

Keep reading... Show less

6 standard missions of the Confederate Secret Service

Popular history remembers the Confederate States of America for a lot of things, but having a developed government capable of almost anything the United States could do is seldom one of those things. But it did have all the trappings of a democratic government, including a Treasury Department, an Electoral College, and even coordinated clandestine activities.

Spies. They had spies.

Keep reading... Show less

NASA just researched the perfect midday nap

Everyone gets that "2:30 feeling." Military personnel happen to get it at all times of day. Maybe you're on mids. Maybe you're in transit from Afghanistan to Japan. Or maybe you're being punished for doing something stupid. It happens. But we don't always have access to Five Hour Energy shots, and sometimes coffee isn't cutting it. The best thing to do is give in: have your battle cover you while you rack out for a few minutes.

Or maybe fifteen? A half-hour? A full hour? How long is the proper power nap? Thanks to NASA, we have the answer.

Keep reading... Show less

US troops in Australia got lucky thanks to rationing

While Australian troops were short pay and couldn't access rationed items, the U.S. troops could get more alcohol and romantic presents with their higher pay and their access to post exchanges. That made American troops popular with Australian paramours but decidedly unpopular with Australian troops.

While no one was keeping good track of exactly how often troops got laid in World War II, historians studying tensions between U.S. and Australian soldiers in northern Australia have noted that rationing, combined with differences in pay and uniform design, gave at least the impression that U.S. soldiers were getting a leg up in romance down under.

Keep reading... Show less

These were Britain's 'manned torpedoes' in World War II

After suffering serious damage to four ships from an Italian attack where commandos rode torpedoes into a harbor to plant bombs on their ships, Britain decided to put its own commandos on torpedoes to attack Italian ships. Yup, there was an arms race in World War II that centered on divers steering torpedoes.

You've probably heard about Japan's Kamikaze tactics, and maybe you've even heard about Japan's manned rockets and torpedoes. But, oddly enough, Japan wasn't the only combatant in World War II that had manned torpedoes. Britain used manned torpedoes and did so years before Japan.

Keep reading... Show less
MIGHTY TRENDING
Rachel Hosie

Bride divides internet when she asks Marine in uniform to leave

A bride has divided the internet after explaining how she kicked a guest out of her wedding for turning up in military uniform.

Writing on Reddit's "Am I The A------" forum, the newlywed said she "felt kind of bad" for asking him to leave, "but it just didn't feel right for him to be there like that."

The man in question was the son of one of the groom's family friends.

He arrived at the wedding in his Marines' dress blues, complete with all his medals, and it did not go down well with the bride.

Keep reading... Show less

ISIS returns after the New Zealand shooting

As the last ISIS stronghold in Syria crumbles, it's clear that the leadership of the terrorist organization had no intention of fighting to the death with their devoted fighters. The whereabouts of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi have been unknown for some time, and those in his inner circle have been just as absent, from either the battlefields or the media.

Until now, that is.

Keep reading... Show less

The 5 native tribes most feared by the US Army

Though they're often overlooked by military historians – not Native historians, mind you – the Plains Wars of the post-Civil War era saw some of the most brutal fighting between the American government and the native tribes fighting for their way of life. Eventually, the U.S. government was determined to move the native people to reservations. Those who did not sell their land were moved by force.

Keep reading... Show less
MIGHTY CULTURE
Scott Sturkol

This Army cold-weather ops course is nuts

More than two dozen Army Rangers with battalions from the 75th Ranger Regiment bolstered their skills in cold-weather operations during training Feb. 21 to March 6, 2019 at Fort McCoy.

The soldiers were part of the 14-day Cold-Weather Operations Course Class 19-05, which was organized by Fort McCoy's Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security and taught by five instructors with contractor Veterans Range Solutions.

Keep reading... Show less