The 13 funniest military memes for the week of September 21st

It was the Air Force's birthday this week — and it seems like, in terms of gifts, they got a lot: Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Keith Wright spoke about "hybrid airmen," which would make airmen more badass and less likely to be mocked by the other branches, the "Up or Out" rule is being evaluated because it was stupid to begin with, and the Captain Marvel trailer, featuring a superhero who was a USAF pilot, dropped the morning of its birthday.

Happy birthday, ya high-flyin' bastards. Make another trip to the chocolate fondue fountain — you guys earned it.

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The good, the bad, and the ugly of PC game ports

As consumers, we all want the best games to be available for the systems we own. Unfortunately, that isn't always the case when a game first launches. Due to prohibitive development costs and publisher agreements, we eager gamers often have to wait months or years for our most-anticipated titles to reach our controller of choice — to be "ported" to a console we own.

In some cases, it's worth the wait, but others have gone so horribly wrong that it makes us cringe.

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History

The insane reason this Pearl Harbor defender didn't get the Medal of Honor

When Japanese planes swept Pearl Harbor in the December, 1941, surprise attack that took America into World War II, there were very few U.S. troops able to fight back in any meaningful way. That doesn't mean resistance was minimal. Once the nature of the attack was realized, American fighting men sprang into action, manning whatever defenses they could. In fact, the Americans drew the first blood of the Japanese-American War, sinking the surveillance sub sent to recon the harbor.

An hour and a half before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese were already losing. But any defense in the face of such a surprise attack is worthy of mention — and worthy of full recognition, yet one Air Corps pilot was denied the full measure of recognition.

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History

Why the Alaska was so important for an American victory in WWII

It's often called the "Forgotten Campaign of the Second World War" — and there's no secret as to why. The campaign lost out on fanfare mostly because it took place in a far off, remote territory that few Americans lived on or cared about. And it didn't help that it happened at a time when Marines and soldiers were pushing onto the beaches at the Battle of Guadalcanal.

The truth is, however, that the sporadic fighting and eventual American victory on the frozen, barren islands of Alaska proved instrumental to an Allied victory in the the Pacific.

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History

The Army made this 1950s film to try and make MPs cool

The film details the patrols of two military police pairs as they foil all sorts of heinous crimes, like uniform infractions and missing curfew. It's like if someone made the first 'Superman' film again, but left out the heroics, crime, drama, and suspense and replaced it all with unintentional comedy.

In 1955, the Army made a video about the the two most handsome military police officers in the history of the Army and their foot patrols through U.S. town, providing "moral guidance" for soldiers and interrupting all sorts of trouble before it starts.

Oddly, they don't write a single speeding ticket, but they do snatch a staff sergeant for driving recklessly.

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History

That time the Army let loose a plague of feral camels on the Wild West

They brought the herd of camels into unfamiliar territory as part of an experiment, but when things went wrong, they accidentally let them loose to terrorize the countryside. No, that's not the plot of a campy, direct-to-DVD horror film, that's a true piece of US Army history.

Following a siege at Camp Verde, Texas, just before the onset of the American Civil War, nearly forty camels escaped US Army custody. These camels turned feral, reproduced, and roamed the southwest for years, damaging farms, eating crops, and generally wreaking havoc wherever they went. A few of them even ended up as the basis for a handful of ghost stories.

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transition
Dan Fazio

The telecommunications jobs that are looking for vets

The telecom sector is rife with opportunities that align perfectly with the skills and experiences of veterans just like you. For starters, degrees aren't required for many positions, which is a boon to the thousands of vets who choose to transition right into careers without first attending college. This industry also demands innovative leaders who are skilled at using technology and have excellent customer-service and relationship-management skills, requirements veterans often fit to a T.

"At T-Mobile, we've found veterans often make the strongest leaders and are high performers, and we are committed to helping give them access to the best job opportunities available. To show our commitment, we've pledged to hire 10,000 veterans and military spouses in the next five years, and we're getting closer to this goal every day," says Donna Wright, senior manager of Military and Diversity Sourcing for T-Mobile.

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History
Daniel Brown

The USS Enterprise was the most decorated World War II carrier

The USS Enterprise (CV-6) was the most decorated US Navy ship in World War II, receiving a Presidential Unit Citation, a Navy Unit Commendation, and 20 Battle Stars.

Commissioned in 1938, the Enterprise took part in several naval battles, such as the Battle of the Philippine Sea and the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Throughout its service in World War II, the Enterprise was struck several times — but the Big E just wouldn't die.

In fact, on three separate occasions, the Japanese mistakenly thought they had sunk the Enterprise and announced it had gone down, inspiring one of the ship's many nicknames, The Grey Ghost.

Check out the photos below of the Enterprise's amazing survival.

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History
Sofia Sereda

The KGB tailed this Frenchman for 8 years, but was he a spy?

Fifty-five years ago, on Sept. 11, 1963, a plane took off from Kyiv for Vienna. On board was Julien Galeotti, a French citizen accused of espionage and expelled from the Soviet Union.

Recently released documents from the KGB archive in Kyiv have revealed details of Galeotti's story and brought to light the remarkable photographs he took during his travels in the Soviet Union. For eight years, KGB agents followed the man they called "The Moustache."

But was he a spy?

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