The 13 funniest military memes for the week of October 19th

The oddest story to came out of the military this week has got to be that sailor who got drunk at Busch Gardens, stripped off all of his clothes, tried to jump in random peoples' vehicles, and fought the police officers trying to detain him before being taken down by a taser.

Now, if it weren't for the fact that everyone in this numbnut's unit now has to go through one hell of a safety brief, I'd be impressed. Clearly, there was a point where he realized that he'd f*cked up so badly that jail time was inevitable, so he nosedived right into legendary status. BZ. It's better to burn out brightly than to just fizzle, right?

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GAMING

5 ways 'Post Scriptum' is one of the most realistic military games

Much like a trustworthy chain of command, realism in video games is hard to find. Battlefield comes close, but it's still got a few too many 360-no-scopes to get us there. That's where a game like Post Scriptum, a WWII-themed, first-person, simulation shooter, comes in. The game's slow pace with spikes high-octane danger make it gripping and tons of fun.

When you think of military first-person shooter games, you probably think of Call of Duty — and if that's your cup of tea, more power to you. But if you're on the search for something that'll get your blood pumping with tension, you might find you enjoy something like Post Scriptum more.

Leaning heavily on realistic scenarios, Periscope Games has created something undeniably cool. Here's what makes it so realistic:

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5 reasons why peacetime training actually matters

It's easy to complain about training for a sh*t deployment to Okinawa, Japan, when there's an active war going on that you would rather be fighting in. Realistically, training exists for a reason. If there wasn't a solid reason for it, you'd go straight from boot camp graduation to combat, but, after centuries of warfare all over the world, we've learned a thing or two.

We get it. You didn't join the military in the post-9/11 era just to be sent to some stable country in East Asia, but you knew the deal when you signed the contract: Where you go and what you do when you get there is officially no longer your choice after you set foot on those yellow footprints.

But just because there's a war going on doesn't mean your "peacetime" training is pointless or worthless. Here's why:

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5 things soldiers should expect, now that we're all recruiters

The U.S. Army recently released a video in which Sergeant Major of the Army Dan Dailey implores all of those serving to get out there and share their reasons for enlisting — to, ultimately, recruit their friends. The video is entitled, Everybody is a recruiter.

So, ladies and gents: it's official. Each and every soldier within the United States Army is now a recruiter. Who knew that we'd all manage to get in without even going through the recruiting course at Fort Knox? Now all we need to do is get our recruitment numbers up and we can all sport a recruiting badge!

If you can't read between the sarcastic lines, SMA Dan Dailey probably has no intentions of shipping everyone into USAREC and crowd shopping malls across the country. First off, that'd be a logistical nightmare. And secondly, if we were all recruiters, then there'd be nobody left to mop the motor pool when it rains or perform lay-outs for the eight change-of-command ceremony this month.

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4 civilian jobs that troops appreciate the most

Sometimes, civilians have a difficult time relating with troops. In many cases, they just don't know how to talk to them. Realistically, it's pretty easy. After all, we're simple creatures; we like a handful of things — alcohol, tattoos, and anything else that's fun with a dash of self-destruction. We're, essentially, the kings and queens of counter-culture — "rebels with a cause," as we were once described by a Marine general.

That being said, there are plenty of civilians out there who fit right in with the troops — usually those who work in a select few professional fields. The following are the civilian professionals that get a ton of love from the troops.

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MILITARY CULTURE
Cpl. Shawn M. Toussaint

This cocktail recipe was kept secret by U.S. Marines for over 200 years

The story begins in pre-revolutionary Philadelphia.

As a result of early trading with Caribbean countries, colonists along the fishing ports massed great quantities of rum and citrus fruits.

These fish houses, as they were called, kept punch bowls of Fish House Punch in their outer foyers to entertain guests as they waited to be seated.

The combination of rum, brandy, lemon juice, water, and sugar gained a reputation for packing a punch among early colonists, including Continental Marines.

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NEWS
Ryan Pickrell

Mattis has tough words for China: 'We will not be intimidated'

Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis called on America's allies to combat Chinese efforts to dominate the contested South China Sea during a trilateral meeting in Singapore Oct. 19, 2018.

"I think that all of us joining hands together, ASEAN allies and partners, and we affirm as we do so that no single nation can rewrite the international rule to the road and expect all nations large and small to respect those rules," Mattis said during a meeting with his Japanese and South Korean counterparts, according to The Hill.

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SPORTS

This is how two WWII veterans changed baseball forever

There have been many iconic moments throughout the storied history of baseball. Every team has their collection of defining moments, immortalized in photos hung on the walls of stadiums across the nation. And then there are those transcendent plays that everyone knows, like when Babe Ruth pointed to a spot in the bleachers, calling his shot perfectly — a move that's often imitated, but rarely ever repeated.

But fans of baseball know that the top two moments are universal and unrivaled: The greatest moment was when Jackie Robinson took his first step over the white chalk and entered the Major Leagues. The crowds heckled Robinson, game after game, until the Dodgers' team captain, Pee Wee Reese, was fed up — which led to the second greatest moment: Reese placed his arm around Robinson, sending a message of friendship into the stands, silencing the jeers.

But their story didn't begin on the diamond. It began when both Army 2nd Lt. Jackie Robinson and Navy Chief Petty Officer Harold "Pee Wee" Reese served their country during World War II.

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GEAR & TECH
Kris Osborn

The Air Force needs special new bombs for China and Russia

Air Force experts and researchers now argue that, when it comes to the prospect of major power warfare, the service will need higher-tech, more flexible and more powerful bombs to destroy well fortified Russian and Chinese facilities.

"There is now a shift in emphasis away from minimizing to maximizing effects in a high-end fight. Requirements from our missions directorate say we continue to have to deal with the whole spectrum of threats as we shift to more of a near-peer threat focus. We are looking at larger munitions with bigger effects," Dr. John S. Wilcox, Director of Munitions for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), said recently at the Air Force Association Annual Conference.

While the Air Force is now moving quickly to engineer new bombs across a wide range of "adjustable" blast effects to include smaller, more targeted explosions, exploring 2,000-pound bomb options engineered for larger attack impacts are a key part of the equation.

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