The 13 funniest military memes for the week of August 17th

Remember back when they first announced that the 1st Security Forces Assistance Brigade would be a thing and everyone lost their collective sh*ts because they're conventional troops that wear berets like special operations, rock a unit patch that looks like special operations, and even share their first two initials (SF) with special forces?

Yeah. Well, they're currently deployed doing grunt things with the Green Berets while your ass is setting up a Powerpoint presentation on how to teach drill and ceremony.

Funny how that works out, huh? Anyways, have some memes before you get too butthurt.

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7 more uniform parts hipsters would love — now that PT belts are cool

As if civilian fashion statements couldn't be any more incomprehensible, Urban Outfitters has planted its own ludicrous flag into the fashion world with their newest accessory: a $30 highlighter-yellow, reflective belt. You know, the exact same type used by troops all over the world since the early '90s.

At first, this news might confuse and frustrate you — it's not stolen valor, but it's definitely appropriation. Then, it'll dawn on you: the fools who buy this belt are literally spending $30 on a product that you can buy for $8 at the PX. So, in a way, who can blame Urban Outfitters? Who wouldn't want to pick up a few and sell them, making a cool $20 profit each?

Hell, we all have tough boxes full of a bunch of old uniform parts that hipsters would pay out the ass to own. The Afghanistan dust just adds character. It's like the "distressed" or "worn-out" look that's apparently a thing. Well, try these on for size:

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Why this Navy veteran with TBI is set to run for 12 full hours

Like many post-9/11 veterans. Amanda Burrill is all about physical fitness. She's very conscious of what food she eats, she makes sure to get enough sleep, and she's very, very active. She has to be — this is how she beats TBI every day of her life. Now, the Navy officer who nearly had to relearn how to walk is set to run — for her fellow veterans, that is.

As a young Navy officer on a deployment, Burrill slipped in a sewage leak and lost consciousness. Soon after, she began to have memory problems. When she went to get it checked out, she was diagnosed with Traumatic Brain Injury. But that didn't deter her — she spent a total of eight years in the Navy. After leaving the service, she became an advocate for veterans suffering from TBI, but first, she became an amazing example for them to follow.

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History

This is how the Titanic was discovered on an unrelated top-secret mission

The RMS Titanic was billed as "unsinkable." Many conflicting reasons have been proposed as to why but, nonetheless, they were proven wrong. When the RMS Titanic sank to the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean, she took with her over 1,500 of her 2,224 estimated passengers and crew.

Countless expeditions were sent to go salvage the wreckage, but it wasn't until 1985 when it was "suddenly" located. For many years, there was a shroud of mystery surrounding exactly how it was found. The truth was later declassified by the Department of the Navy. As it turns out, finding the Titanic was a complete accident on the part of U.S. Navy Commander Robert Ballard, who was searching for the wreckage of two Navy nuclear submarines.

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History

See Eisenhower tour the graveyard of D-Day 20 years later

Former President and Supreme Allied Commander Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower toured the beaches of Normandy, and its graveyard, with Walter Cronkite on the 20th anniversary of the massive battle.

Former President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander for the Allied Expeditionary Force during World War II and NATO soon after, toured the graveyard over Omaha Beach in France in 1966. He was with Walter Cronkite at the end of a trip where the two men toured Eisenhower's headquarters for the invasion and saw the spots in which thousands of men died in service to their country.

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Amy Bushatz

Urban Outfitters is now selling the famous PT belt

Troops everywhere know PT belts are the height of military fashion. At one point, they were second only to the BCG. But then the military did away with those and knocked everyone's favorite reflective plastic belt to the top of the list of uniform items that are both beautiful and utilitarian.

It's hard to be this cool both inside and outside a gym, but somehow military members worldwide do it every day.

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History
Ryan Persinger

An interview with one of the last WWII Marine fighter pilots

Sam Folsom, born July 24, 1920 in Quincy, Massachusetts, was one of the first echelon of 17 Marine fighter pilots with Marine Fighter Squadron 121 tasked with defending Guadalcanal. He is also one of the last living Marine Corps WWII combat pilot.

It was the summer of 1941, while Folsom was attending a flight training program in Jacksonville, Florida, that the unthinkable happened.

"I was lying in my bunk in Florida," Folsom recalled. "I turned on the radio and it blared out 'Pearl Harbor has been attacked', so I did what any patriotic American would've done. I jumped to my feet, got dressed and ran to the door as fast as I could."

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A sailor's worst nightmare: Surviving a sinking ship

Sailors on ships destroyed by enemy fire or a crash suddenly find themselves within a waking nightmare. They're forced to escape passageway after passageway filled with fire, rushing water, and thick smoke as the steel hull of their ship slowly tries to suck them under the surface of the ocean to certain death.

With millions of boats and ships plying the waves, it's easy to forget that mankind isn't made to survive in the ocean — and the dangers inherent to the sea are compounded when you're trapped a few decks below the waterline in a huge iron bubble filled with ammunition and fuel that's on fire as it sinks into icy waters.

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NEWS
Ryan Pickrell

China plans new satellites to spy in South China Sea

China reportedly wants to extend its surveillance state to the South China Sea by launching satellites to watch "every reef and ship" in the contested sea.

Beginning in 2019, China will begin launching satellites to monitor the region, as well as enforce "national sovereignty," the South China Morning Post reported Aug. 16, 2018, citing China's state-run China News Service. Six optical satellites, two hyerspectral satellites and two radar satellites will form the Hainan satellite constellation system, creating a real-time "CCTV network in space" controlled by operators in Hainan.

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