10 tanks that changed the history of armored warfare

From the British Mk. I that ushered in tank warfare to the M1 Abrams tank that slaughtered its way through Iraqi divisions in Desert Storm, armored warfare has come a long way in 100 years. Here's our top 10 list of the tanks that have changed armored warfare.

The 13 funniest military memes for the week of December 14th

A new study was recently released by the VA that monitored the effects of drinking alcohol heavily on a daily basis. In case you weren't yet aware, regularly binge drinking is bad for you.

So, instead of joining in with the rest of society and bashing the VA for studying the painfully obvious, I'm actually going to take their side. Tracking. Sure, it's still a gigantic waste of time and money, but it's clever as f*ck if you think about it. Imagine being a doctor on that study. You've got nothing to do for a few months but drink free booze, you're still getting paid a doctor's salary, and the answer is clear as day well before you're done? F*ck yeah! Sign my ass up!

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History

5 rituals warriors used to prepare for battle

War, like math, is a universal language shared by every strata of civilization. Warriors from all cultures have, in one form or another, prepared themselves physically and mentally for the task at hand. More often than not, stepping onto the battlefield meant risking bodily death.

With the end of natural life so near, many warriors would confer with the divine, looking for their blessing to carry them to victory. Some conjured animal spirits to lend them their strength while others requested that deities guide their blades.

These are the rituals that prepared the champions of various cultures to meet their fate.

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History

Navy might know what sank its only major warship lost in WWI

The Navy lost only one major warship in World War I, an armored cruiser that sank off the East Coast after a massive explosion tore through its lower plating and sank the ship in less than an hour. Now, researchers might have the definitive answer of what sank the ship.

When America joined the Great War, the British Fleet was holding most of the German Navy in the North Sea, meaning that American warships and troop ships rarely faced severe opposition. But one ship did fall prey to an unknown assailant: The USS San Diego, sank off the U.S. East Coast due to a massive explosion from an unknown source.

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History

Hitler had no idea the Soviets were so strong before invading

He admits it in his only recorded conversation.

By the time Nazi Germany launched Operation Barbarossa, they were already at war with the British Empire, Yugoslavia, and Greece. Poland, France, and much of Western Europe had already fallen, but governments in exile joined the Allied effort against the Axis powers. So, the natural thing to do would be invade the world's largest country, right?

If you're Hitler, obviously, your answer is yes.

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History

The most dangerous club for World War II Civil Air Patrol pilots

There's a reason the Civil Air Patrol earned the Congressional Gold Medal.

Americans today would have a hard time recognizing the all-out war effort citizens of the United States made during World War II. The idea of government dictating what and how much big business could produce, restricting the use of civilian products available to the public, and the mobilization of civilians in a war effort are all things that we just haven't faced in the generations since. During World War II, these civilians were putting their lives on the line to hunt submarines.

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This is what troops do when they're wintered over in Antarctica

Winter sucks everywhere. Sure, the bugs have finally frozen over and you can finally break out that coat you like, but it's cold, you're always late because your car won't defrost in time, and no one seems to remember to tap their brakes when stopping at intersections.

But, as any optimist might tell you, things can always get worse! While it sucks for us up here in the middle of December, it's actually the nicest time to be in Antarctica — nice by Antarctic standards anyway.

It doesn't last, though, as the winters there begin in mid-February and don't let up until mid-November. And don't forget, we have brothers and sisters in the U.S. Armed Forces down there embracing the suck of the coldest temperatures on Earth.

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History

The Donner Party really should have taken the Army's advice

At some point while growing up, every kid is issued a stern warning from their parents to not touch the hot stove when it's on. Most kids take that advice at face value and never risk it. But then there are the other kids; the ones who repeatedly try to poke at the red hot coils. Eventually, there comes a time where the curious kids get burnt.

This is basically what happened to the ill-fated and infamous Donner Party in 1847. History often paints the pioneers as unfortunate travelers, but it also often glosses over the fact that they were issued repeated warnings by the United States Army, who told them to stay away.

Spoiler alert: They didn't stay away and it didn't end well for thirty-nine of them — and if they were petty enough, the Army could've issued the survivors a "so, what did we learn?"

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Entertainment
Alicia Kort

Watch Aquaman actor perform a maori dance with his kids

Movie premieres are usually the same. Celebrities walk the red carpet in glamorous clothes, get their pictures taken thousands of times and maybe give a few interviews. Dec. 12, 2018, at the Aquaman premiere, Jason Momoa and his kids decided to liven up what would have been a typical movie premieres and honor their heritage in the same awesome moment.

Momoa took off his suit jacket and necklace and performed a traditional haka, which is a Māori ceremonial dance that includes chanting and stamping. His Aquaman castmembers, including Temuera Morrison who plays Aquaman's father in the film, and Momoa's two children, 11-year-old daughter Lola and 9-year-old son Nakoa-Wolf, joined him.

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MILITARY CULTURE
Ryan Pickrell

Check out awesome National Guard photos on its 382nd birthday

The National Guard, a unique part of the American military, traces its origins to the birth of the first organized colonial militia regiments on December 13, 1636.

The Guard, which includes some of the oldest units in the US military, is a reserve component that can be called up on a moment's notice to respond to domestic emergencies or participate in overseas combat missions.

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