10 tanks that changed the history of armored warfare

From the British Mk. I that ushered in tank warfare to the M1 Abrams tank that slaughtered its way through Iraqi divisions in Desert Storm, armored warfare has come a long way in 100 years. Here's our top 10 list of the tanks that have changed armored warfare.

The 13 funniest military memes for the week of December 14th

A new study was recently released by the VA that monitored the effects of drinking alcohol heavily on a daily basis. In case you weren't yet aware, regularly binge drinking is bad for you.

So, instead of joining in with the rest of society and bashing the VA for studying the painfully obvious, I'm actually going to take their side. Tracking. Sure, it's still a gigantic waste of time and money, but it's clever as f*ck if you think about it. Imagine being a doctor on that study. You've got nothing to do for a few months but drink free booze, you're still getting paid a doctor's salary, and the answer is clear as day well before you're done? F*ck yeah! Sign my ass up!

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What Russia's deadliest nuclear sub could do to the US

Russia has two classes of nuclear submarines that could absolutely annihilate American military installations and cities if even a single one of the submarines attacked us at home. So, what would happen if these submarines attacked, and what keeps them from doing so?

In the inky black water, a predator slowly rises from the depths of the Gulf of Mexico like an Old God or Godzilla, but even more devastating and lethal: The Russian submarine Yuri Dolgoruky with 16 nuclear-tipped Bulava cruise missiles on board. When it begins ripple-firing its missiles, it could send 96 warheads into American cities and military installations.

It's a real submarine that's in service right now, and it could annihilate American cities in a surprise attack.

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A sentinel at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier stood watch for 23 hours during a hurricane

"A soldier never dies until he is forgotten; a Tomb Guard never forgets."

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier has been guarded for 24 hours a day, seven days a week, nonstop since July 2, 1937. The Tomb Sentinels that protect the site are the best of the best the U.S. Army has to offer and nothing short of Armageddon is going to break that discipline. By the time Hurricane Sandy hit the D.C. area in 2012, it was a "superstorm," expected to kill more people and cause more damage than any hurricane since Katrina in 2005.

That didn't faze Sgt. Shane Vincent one bit.

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History

500 people in China built a road to free American WWII remains

After the bodies of ten American airmen in their B-24 Liberator were found in the Mao'er Mountains in a remote area of central China, the local villagers did the most extraordinary thing: They banded together to dig an entirely new road to make sure those airmen could be retrieved and returned to their families.

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Veterans

Why this new program is the smartest thing the VA has done recently

Let's be completely honest: Getting veterans the help they need is a tricky task. What works for one person may not work for another. Simply telling veterans they have the option to seek help if they need it is important, yes, but it's not going to pull those who are blind to their own struggles out of the shadows.

There are many veterans who can personally attest to the successes and benefits of the fine mental health professionals within the Veterans Administration. There are others, however, who end up opt for heart-breaking alternatives to talking about their feelings with a stranger. There's no easy solution to getting help to those who don't seek it and there's no magic wand out there that can wish away the pain that our veteran community suffers daily.

But the first step is always going to be opening up about the pain.

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Why the US military needs to seriously rethink 'recruiter goals'

Each year, the United States Armed Forces projects the amount of troops that will exit the service and how many new bodies it needs to fill the gaps in formation. This number is distributed accordingly between the branches and then broken down further for each recruiting station, depending on the location, size of the local population, and typical enlistment rates of each area.

This is, at a very basic level, how recruiter quotas work. If the country is at war, the need for more able-bodied recruits rises to meet the demand. When a war is winding down, as we're seeing today, you would reasonably expect there to be less pressure on recruiters to send Uncle Sam troops — but there's not. Not by a long shot.

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Brain surgery to bear hugs: One wounded warrior’s story

Born with a birth defect causing seizures, battling anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, and facing divorce and separation from a child can be a lot for anyone to handle, but with a community of support, things can get better.

For retired Air Force Capt. Rob Hufford, no statement could ring truer. From an all-time low to bear-hugging England's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, while in Australia to compete in the Invictus Games, things are looking up for Hufford.

"I researched the effect of lingering hugs," Hufford said. "Psychotherapist Virginia Satir said four hugs a day for maintenance, eight hugs a day for survival, and 12 hugs a day for growth."

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MILITARY CULTURE
Senior Airman Mya M. Crosby

These are the 'American Choppers' of the Air Force

With the eight 13 hour flights the aircraft of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing have on a daily basis, some parts of the aircraft can wear down, crack or break over periods of time.

The 380th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron fabrication flight, also known as "Fab Flight" or the "American Chopper" of aircraft maintenance at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, is in charge of identifying and repairing aircraft structural damage. They fix whatever can be broken, from a metal panel off the side of a KC-10 Extender to a tiny cracked screw the size of a fingernail.

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