Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY MOVIES

3 real life consequences that movie fights totally miss

20th Century Fox

Although we're not always keen to admit it, the way we see the world and how we function in it tends to be largely informed by the pop-culture we consume along the way. The movies and TV shows we watch as kids not only help us to perceive a world beyond our views out the window, they have a habit of planting the seeds of foolish thought in our brains Inception-style; leaving us with a skewed idea of things like what really goes on in a fight, thanks to how often we see them depicted inaccurately on screen.

In fact, if you've never had the misfortune of suffering a nasty injury on one of your limbs, getting knocked out, or being in close proximity to an explosion, you might be harboring some pretty unrealistic ideas about just how deadly each can be. It might sound silly to suggest that people can't tell the difference between something Wolverine can do and something your average Joe can… but many of these movie tropes have become such deep-rooted parts of our cultural lexicon that it starts to get difficult to discern truth from fiction. That is, unless you've been there first hand.


1. Being knocked out is totally fine

This is actually how Chuck Norris babysits people's kids.

It's Batman's bread and butter, it helped Marty McFly's mom gets handsy with her time traveling son, and it's the most common workplace hazard for henchman and thugs, but the truth is, getting knocked out could seriously mess you up.

Movies may make it seem like getting knocked out with a single blow is basically the same thing as racking out for an impromptu nap, but here in the real world, blunt force trauma to the head tends to come with some serious repercussions. The Riddler's henchman may come to in a few hours and complain of feeling groggy, but if you're ever knocked out for hours, you'll almost certainly wake up in the ICU of your local hospital, surrounded by some very concerned family members (and hopefully you'll still know your name).

Head trauma that's sufficient to knock you unconscious actually creates a neurochemical reaction in the brain that causes cell death that can potentially affect you for the rest of your life.

2. Fire is apparently the only dangerous part of explosions

Seems legit.

Watching a protagonist walk toward the camera while a slow-motion explosion unfolds in the background might be one of the most overused (and somehow still rad) shots in cinematic history… but it's also totally ridiculous. Movies treat explosions like it's the fireball you have to be worried about, but the most dangerous part of an explosion is usually invisible to the naked eye: the shockwave.

Way back in the first "Mission Impossible" movie, Tom Cruise's Ethan Hunt actually managed to seemingly ride the shockwave of an exploding helicopter (that was foolishly made out of dynamite, apparently) onto a speeding train. The shot is incredible, and it actually makes the superhero-like sequels make a lot more sense, since Ethan Hunt must actually be dreaming in a coma from that point on, while surgeons try to do something about the soup that used to be his organs.

Anyone that's ever thrown a grenade can tell you that explosions are far faster and more dangerous than they're depicted in movies. Most happen so quickly that we perceive them as little more than a thunderous impact and sudden poof of smoke, but it's the shockwave that will literally liquify your inside parts (like your brain). In the medical community, they call this internal mushification "total body disruption," which may not sound as cool as "internal mushification" but is apparently just as deadly.

3. Flesh wounds are no big deal

I mean, the bleeding has already stopped. This guy might actually make it if he quits now.

There's no faster way to show us how badass a movie hero really is than to watch him dismiss a gunshot to the arm as "nothing but a flesh wound." John Mcclane loses enough blood in the "Die Hard" movies to keep the Red Cross from chasing down donations for at least a year, but somehow those injuries never seem to slow him down at all.

These "flesh wounds" usually exist only so the female lead's character arc can develop from annoyed at the hero to empathetic: "You're hurt!" She exclaims as she runs to check the flap of skin hanging off of our hero's tricep.

"It's nothing," he grimaces as he loads another seemingly infinite magazine into his weapon. As Jesse Ventura said in "Predator," and probably at least once as Governor of Minnesota, "I ain't got time to bleed."

The problem is, you can absolutely die from a wound on your arm or leg. In fact, you can die pretty damn quickly if you rupture an artery. When it comes to unchecked bleeding, what you really don't have time for is ignoring it.