Sometimes, civilians have a difficult time relating with troops. In many cases, they just don't know how to talk to them. Realistically, it's pretty easy. After all, we're simple creatures; we like a handful of things — alcohol, tattoos, and anything else that's fun with a dash of self-destruction. We're, essentially, the kings and queens of counter-culture — "rebels with a cause," as we were once described by a Marine general.

That being said, there are plenty of civilians out there who fit right in with the troops — usually those who work in a select few professional fields. The following are the civilian professionals that get a ton of love from the troops.


But, before we kick this off, I want to make it clear you don't have to work in one of these fields for troops to appreciate you. Troops appreciate support of any kind — even if it's a simple "thank you."

1. Bartenders

Easily topping this list is your friendly neighborhood beer-slinger. Troops love to drink and, although some troops might find themselves embroiled in "friendly" disagreements with their bartender after kicking back a few, a good service member will always respect the person behind the bar that helps them wind down after a long week.

You should never piss off your bartender, honestly.

(U.S. Air Force)

2. Tattoo artists

Troops love tattoos, too. For each new piece, a troop will sit on the chair or bench for hours at a time — so you kind of can't help but become friends with your tattoo artist. Artists in a military town tend to understand troops because they tattoo a lot of us. They know what we like to talk about and they can probably all draw a perfect eagle, globe, and anchor with their eyes closed.

Tattoo artists are almost always cool with service members.

(William Cho)

3. Barbers

Troops need haircuts and a good barber is hard to find. If you're lucky, you'll find that one place off-base that isn't too expensive and leaves you with a better cut than the clowns on base shop can offer.

Okay, okay. The ones from the shop on base aren't always bad.

(U.S. Navy photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Chris Desmond)

4. Doctors

Life, especially one spent in the armed forces, leaves you with a lot of complications. As warfighters, we spend a lot of time working on our own bodies and training to deliver harm to the enemies'. Although doctors have a much more thorough understanding of human anatomy, troops certainly have a lot of questions.

Doctors specialize in fixing humans and grunts, well, we specialize in the opposite. Plus, grunts have medical professionals embedded with us in the form of medics and corpsman, who are usually the best friends any troop could have. So, we sort of lump all doctors in with them.

A lot of respect goes both ways in this regard.

(U.S. Navy)