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Air Force Pararescue Jumper reunites with girl he saved after Hurricane Katrina

When Master Sgt. Mike Maroney was a staff sergeant he rescued 3-year-old LeShay Brown a few days after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005. An Air Force Combat Photographer happened to be on the mission, and snapped a now-iconic photo.


"They just happened to snap a photo of this little girl who really, for me, made the day. It was a rough day," Maroney told the cast of The Real, a nationally syndicated daytime talk show. "It was seven days into Katrina. Earlier in July, I just got back from a deployment to Afghanistan, it was my worst deployment. To see New Orleans under water and destroyed just really took a toll on me, so when she gave me that hug I wasn't even on the planet at that point."

Maroney saved 140 people in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina but the memory of that hug stayed with him. Maroney, now 40 years old and a 19-year Air Force Veteran kept that photo on his wall for the past decade which he says helped him through a lot of dark times stemming from his service.

He never knew that little girl's name. One day, he decided to find her and posted the photo on Facebook, hoping it would go viral. Someone reached out to Maroney after noticing the search for the girl had not gone very far.

"I had the idea to put it on Facebook to see if anyone is looking for her," Maroney said. "It got 42 likes. Nothing. Up 'til last year, nothing. Then a young man named Andrew [Goard] wrote me and said, 'Hey, its my life's goal. I'm gonna help you find this little girl."

Goard is a high school student in Waterford, Michigan whose grandfather served in Vietnam, and he idolized Pararescue Jumpers (he even has an Instagram page devoted to them). He helped the hashtag #FindKatrinaGirl go viral. The story was eventually picked up by Air Force Times and distributed around to smaller news outlets, until it ended up in front of LeShay Brown, who is now 13 and living in Waveland, Mississippi.

"I wish I could explain to you how important your hug was," Maroney told LeShay Brown. "Your small gesture helped me through a dark phase. You rescued me more than I rescued you."

"In my line of work, it doesn't usually turn out happily," Maroney said. "This hug, this moment, was like – everybody I've ever saved, that was the thank you."

Watch the full reunion on The Real.

 

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