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Now you can race to the Rhine fueled by 80-proof liquid Patton

Your local exchange's package store could soon have a surprise for you military history buffs: a little taste of "Old Blood and Guts" for your tumbler.


Kentucky's Boundary Oak Distillery is now distributing a liquor bearing the face of the famous Gen. George S. Patton. Even though it hails from Kentucky and is made by a bourbon distillery, the libation isn't actually bourbon. Instead, the manufacturers call the barrel-aged cane liquor "Patton Armored Diesel" after the tradition Patton started during World War II.

According to Boundary Oak, that World War II-era drinking tradition included a "drink, a cup, and a sign his troops associated with Armored Diesel." The bootleg hooch was made differently from division to division, using a mixture that included bourbon, whiskey, scotch, and white wine. One variation even had a shot of cherry juice to represent "the blood of our enemies."

"Everybody who has seen this has been equally as excited as we are about it," Boundary Oak owner and master distiller Brent Goodin told the Associated Press.

Patton commanded the 7th Army during the Allied invasion of Sicily in World War II and then led the 3rd Army through France and Germany after the D-Day landings of June 6, 1944. He died in a car accident shortly after the end of the war in Europe.

He is one of the most celebrated leaders in the history of the United States Army.

And you thought that movie was just a drama. (U.S. Army photo)

Part of the revenues from Patton Armored Diesel will benefit the General George Patton Museum and Center of Leadership at Fort Knox. The liquor has the endorsement of the Army and the Patton family. Patton's grandson, George Patton "Pat" Waters, told the AP the product was "a real tribute to all those soldiers who served over there with Gen. Patton."

Waters will help promote Patton Armored Diesel, which retails for around $46 per bottle.

Its first big promotion features a limited edition collector's case for the bottles. The case is designed to look like a mini version of the general's footlocker, complete with the stenciled "PATTON" lettering on the lid.

Patton's dog Willie mourns after the general's 1945 death. (U.S. Army photo)

"We're not trying to glorify alcohol, we're just trying to glorify him," said Goodin in the same AP interview. "This generation, they enjoy craft American spirits, and we want to give them a history lesson along with a good drink."