These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY FIT

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Well, it’s about that time again. The Army has plans for another physical fitness test with events other than push-ups, sit-ups, and a two mile run. This time around, the review process seems to have lasted longer than a few weeks so it might possibly, maybe, actually happen.


The new Army Combat Readiness Test will more than likely become a thing. There will now be six events instead of the previous three. The idea behind it is that it reflects the real-world obstacles of combat.

All muscle groups will be worked out, as opposed to just the upper-body, core and cardio endurance. Equipment will now be used. Possibly gender neutral but MOS-specific scoring. And some officer who was REALLY into Crossfit is happy.

Event 1: Leg Tuck

Testing your shoulders, core, and leg endurance, the objective is to raise your knees to your elbow as many times as you can until you reach muscle failure. It simulates climbing tasks.

This event isn’t too demanding or challenging in theory. The concern is trying to keep your endurance up to the point where you can complete as many as you can without reaching complete muscle failure — you don’t want to shoot yourself in the foot for the remaining five events.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Event 2: Power Throw

Testing your upper and lower body power, the objective is to toss a 10lb medicine ball behind you as far as you can twice (with both attempts added to the closest centimeter). It simulates lifting, progressive levels of force, and uh, tossing?

Holy crap, dude. If you can’t get someone to help watch where you’re blindly throwing a 10lb ball, just do squats with the ball instead. Shy of the combat application of the ACRT, the second goal is to minimize injuries. Don’t make this event more dangerous than doing a sit-up.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Event 3: Trap Bar Dead-lift

Testing your lower and back strength, the objective is to dead-lift the trap bar three times with a weight you determine. It simulates a soldier’s ability to lift and carry someone on a litter or move equipment.

Remember that “minimize injury” thing from the last event? Learn how to do a proper dead-lift. No way around that. This is supposed to be less dangerous than a push-up. Even if your form is good, it would be beneficial to know your maximum dead-lift weight you can actually perform — three times — so you aren’t wasting your time (and effort) doing two, then have to bump down in weights and try three again. Work smarter not harder.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Event 4: T Push-up

Testing your upper body endurance, the objective is to successfully complete as many T Push-ups as you can before you reach muscle failure. It simulates pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact.

It’s just like a push-up. But when you’re down, touch your chest on the ground and spread your arms. Do this until you get tired.

No health risk, but I mean, it would be funny watching someone try to skip steps to be fast and face-plant into the ground. Please take photos to laugh at the poor SOB.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Event 5: Shuttle Sprint-Drag-Carry

Testing your muscular strength, anarobic capacity, and ability to exert effort at high intensity for brief moments, the object is to lay prone. On the command “Go!” sprint 25m down and 25 back. Pick up the straps to a 100lb sled and drag it 25m down and back. Sprint the 25m down and back again. Grab two 40lb kettlebells and run the 25m down and back. Then finish the event sprinting again.

So it’s sprint, sled, sprint, kettlebells, and sprint. No real way to prepare sprinting with 40lb kettlebells without just sprinting with 40lbs kettlebells.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Event 6: 2-Mile Run

Testing your cardio-respiratory endurance, the objective is to run two miles — and just like before, you’re still graded on how fast you finish it. It simulates a soldier’s ability to execute long distance ruck marches and to run two miles?

And the new fitness test still involves the run. Only thing different is the grading. So yeah. Get some.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Featured

5 hilarious ways to get your PT in during quarantine

Pandemic mania has set in as the country braces together (on their couches) to flatten the curve. While we’re all hoping to drop a few curves (on the international scale), our doomsday snacks are threatening to exponentially expand our waistlines.

Sticking to a militant regiment of working out might look different, but it’s not impossible. Think of it like a fun drinking game…without the drinking and a lot less fun. Here’s your new at home PT list.


These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Replace your Drill Sergeant with your hangry kids

Eager to replace the salty Sergeant voice still ringing in your head yelling, “Drop and give me 20?” We’ve got a solution for that — kids in quarantine. Every time you hear “I want a snack” that’s your cue to drop and pump out a quick round of push-ups, sit-ups or burpees. Believe us when we say you’ll never be in better shape.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Trips to the fridge require squats

It’s 10:27 am and you’re on your third trip to the icebox. You want to quit the snacks but the snacks are calling you. How do people ignore a perfectly good pint of ice cream all day? They do it by mandating squats for each and every trip to the fridge. Rocky road looks a lot rockier if it means a set of 50.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

No ruck, no problems

Working out with a full-fledged army of children running around makes sunrise PT look a lot more attractive right about now. Need to get some miles in with munchkins around? This is what they made child carrier backpacks for. Strap ’em in and ruck on.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

How to end news cycle scrolling

Doomsday news is so fascinating, it can lead to an infectious disease we’re calling “mindless scrolling.” But alas, there is a cure for getting off the couch and redirecting your tired eyeballs from the hourly updates. Next time you’re feeling the itch to peek at the latest pandemic news, require yourself to run a solid mile first. Yep, a whole mile. Give a mile, get a minute (or 60) of news coverage. If you’re a habitual news checker, you can thank us later for your new marathon-ready body.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Keep calm and drink on

We’ve said it before — military life has prepared you for this. Watching every civilian lose their s!*t right now over the government disrupting plans and telling them what to do is entertaining to say the least. We as a community know a thing or two about government mandates. For every Facebook post you see fretting over cancelled plans, take a drink…of “water.” Drinking half your bodyweight in water is a challenge no more if you follow this plan. We’re guessing you’ll be up to your mark well before noon.

MIGHTY FIT

Here’s how working out every day can save you money

It’s no secret that service members don’t make a whole lot of money compared to the intense workload they face every single day. Since this lack of funds can limit things we like to do during our days off, we have to find little ways to compensate our cash to make sure we pay our bills.

Every few weeks, veterans should sit down and create a budget plan and adequately manage their incoming cash flow. These charges typically account for rent, groceries, and entertainment. The costs add up quickly, and it doesn’t feel like there’s much left over to put in savings.

But what if we told you that you can save some real coin if you just decided to it start hitting the gym on a daily basis?

Would that potentially blow your mind?


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Working out regularly has been proven to amplify your immune system — which means you won’t get as sick throughout the year. This also means you’ll save money from going to the doctor and paying that crappy co-pay. According to Tech Insider, people who exercise at least 30 minutes a day five days a week save an average of $2,500 a year.

That’s a sh*t load!

Researchers tracked heart health and annual medical expenses of 26,239 men and women for two whole years. Those who had all around poor health shelled out the cash for all those doctor visits. However, those who stuck to an exercise regiment saved $3,000 more a year than those in poor health.

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Keep in mind this study includes hospitalization, prescription medication, emergency room visits, and outpatient visits. All because they spent time doing some sort of aerobic activity. Being able to save $3,000 a year may not seem like a whole lot, but divide that by 12, and you’re looking around keeping an extra $250 in your pocket a month.

Now, this study only focused on those with heart problems, but daily exercise can reduce the can of developing cancer, losing bone density, and type 2 diabetes. Acquiring these ailments isn’t as fun as looking jacked down at the beach.

Check out the Tech Insider video below if you want all this information repeated all over again.

MIGHTY FIT

Do you need a Drill Instructor in your civilian life?

Remember your initial indoc school to the military? I do: It was hot and heavy, and not in a good way, like at a rave or water park. You were asked in a short period of time to learn the entire guiding doctrine of your service of choice, so much so that you could easily fold into the operational forces upon completion of the school.

That is no small task.

How was this accomplished? We weren’t given textbooks and told to read. We weren’t even put into classes and told to take notes. Nope.


These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

I’m just walking bro, no need to yell.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class William Blankenship/Released)

We were taken under the wing of professionals who have already lived and breathed that which we were about to undertake.

I fully understand that that is a rose-colored-glasses approach toward the DI, MTI, RDC, or Drill Sergeant that you still have nightmares about. Hear me out though: an argument can be made that an instructor, who I’ll affectionately refer to as a “coach” from now on, is the one thing standing between you and your personal and professional goals.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

He wants you to hate him. It’s his coaching style.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)

The research

The body of literature on the topic of coaching is dense and complicated, but suffice it to say that the question is not if a coach is effective. It’s how can coaches be most effective.

Two of the main factors discussed are attitude and control.

The attitude evoked by the person who is teaching you dictates how well you perform. You and your coach need to be on the same page. In your basic training, your “coach” did this whether you realized it or not. It was most likely in an “us vs. them” approach. Meaning your instructor made you want to prove him or her wrong. The dirty secret is that they wanted you to prove them wrong as well. #reversepsychology.

Control is simple. The person learning needs to have some sense of control over their outcome. In the beginning of your schoolhouse, undoubtedly you had little to no control. Over time, you were given choices and tasks that directly impacted whether or not you chose to be successful.

These are the fundamentals of great coaching in a high volume way.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Civilian life has its pitfalls too. Don’t wait until it feels like its too late.

(Photo by Campaign Creators on Unsplash)

Civilian life

The assumption of a coach is that you are going to get better, and faster than you would with no one helping. Eventually, you would have figured out the rules of the military well enough to “graduate” to the active forces, but it would not have been as cleanly or efficiently as it was with the guiding force of your instructor.

It’s quite common for former service members to decide they can do everything alone upon separation. That’s a mistake. We assume that we are now the commander of our own lives until we eventually hit a wall. Then we start looking for guidance.

Don’t wait for that moment.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Pro athletes know this truth. They can’t do it alone.

(Photo by Xuan Nguyen on Unsplash)

“No man is an island…” -John Donne

If you want to be an entrepreneur, find someone who has done it and learn from them. They will keep you from falling into all the typical pitfalls.

If you want to stay home and raise a family, read from the best and learn from your friends and family that have the types of children you want.

If you wanna get in killer shape, find someone who makes that happen for people.

Don’t waste your time.

You are always in the basic training of something.

Don’t spend more time on Parris Island getting eaten by sand fleas than necessary. Find and follow the coach that will lead you past your goal.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

How would he know where to crawl if it wasn’t for explicit guidance?

(Photo by David Dismukes)

Tips for finding a keeper

For many service members, the whole reason they get out is because they are sick of other people telling them what to do.

Now you have the choice as to what type of person you want to get your guidance from. If you don’t like the volatile gunny with bad breath and a worse temper, you don’t need to work with him anymore. Here are five things to look for in your coach of choice for any endeavor you may have.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

This kid knows what’s up. What’s his economy of force coach?

(Source: pixabay.com)

  1. Attitude: Find someone who has a similar attitude towards your goal that you have or hope to develop.
  2. Control: Look for someone who allows you to maintain control over your life. Someone that guides instead of mandates.
  3. Save time: The whole purpose is to find someone who gets you where you want to get faster with less time wasted. Don’t spend more time digging a hole than is necessary.
  4. Feel happier: Happiness is subjective. You need not be smiling the entire time. You simply want to feel like you are making progress that you can be proud of.
  5. Find your economy of force: A great coach will show you where to employ the bulk of your effort and show you what tasks and practices you should approach with a minimum effective dose mentality.
These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now
MIGHTY FIT

Three ways playing football for the military is nothing like playing in college

There’s something about football that just lends itself to the melodramatic emotions of our youth. It’s the closest socially acceptable approximation to gladiatorial combat young men in our modern civilized world can pursue, and as such, it tends to hold an honored place in our hearts. The gridiron is where we proved our mettle; Where we found that toughness within us we always hoped was there.


And then, just like that, it’s gone. For most of us, football ends right around when real life begins, and you’re left with no choice but to trade in your pads and passion for a steady job and a pile of bills. Although I once had college football aspirations, an injury cost me that opportunity, and I found myself working as a race mechanic alongside a dozen other “coulda beens”–if only we’d made that one last tackle, dodged that one block, or chased the dream while our knees were still strong enough to hack it.

I joined the Marine Corps at 21 years old and with no intention of finding my way back onto the field. I had found my way to rugby after my college football “career” ended, but as I checked in to my first duty station at 29 Palms, California, neither was on my mind. That is, until I noticed the battalion team practicing just a few blocks away from my barracks room.

The next season, I earned myself a starting spot on the battalion team, which led to a spot on the base team, and eventually, to the first of two Marine Corps championships. Those successes, however, were hard earned… as playing ball for the Corps wasn’t quite like it had been back home in the hills of Vermont.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Playing pulling guard meant I at least got a running start before I tried to smash these dudes.

You’re playing against Marines, some of whom are battle-hardened veterans.

As Al Pacino once so eloquently put it, football is a game of inches. For all the strategy, practice, and technique involved, football is one of the few places left that sheer toughness remains a high-value commodity. Sometimes, when everything else is even, it’s the guy that’s willing to hurt that’ll get the job done. Sometimes you have to choose between the game and your safety. Knowing that reaching for that ball thrown across the flats against a zone defense will almost certainly mean taking a helmet to the sternum and choosing to do it anyway isn’t something you’re taught. It’s just who you are.

In most leagues, you’ll be lucky to find a few players willing to throw their bodies into the grinder for a “W.” In the Marine Corps, we already live in the grinder. Infantry units field teams between combat deployments, Marines attend football practices between training rotations in martial arts and on the rifle range. Mental and physical toughness is a prerequisite to success in the Corps, and as such, the playing field is ripe with men willing to hurt in order to achieve their goals.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

The things we do to have a Sergeant Major hand us a wooden football.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Scott Schmidt)

Service members thrive on competition (and that can really suck).

Playing football in the Marine Corps comes with a level of competitive social pressure that can really only be compared to some high-level college teams. When you’re on a squad with a shot at some trophies, you’re representing more than the team itself, you’re representing your unit. The commanding general may not give a sh*t about your last inspection, but he does about the score of this week’s game. A slew of wins can make you feel like a celebrity, but a bad loss can make you ashamed to show your face at work… or in front of your commanding officer.

Marines, perhaps more than other services, are in a perpetual state of competition. Like Ricky Bobby, if we aren’t first, we’re last… and nobody’s going to let you forget it.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

We’re all here with a job to do.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Albert F. Hunt)

The Corps always comes first.

If you play football for a successful college program, you’re expected to keep up with your grades, but otherwise, the sport is your job. Marine Corps football can be a lot like that–with the obligations of the sport occasionally taking precedence over other duties (like when you go TAD/TDY for away games), but at the end of the day, the Marine Corps is a warfighting institution.

Infantry units, for instance, often had their seasons cut short by field requirements or combat deployments. Players on your team would be pulled from the roster to augment a deploying unit. Last season’s star quarterback may miss this season because he has to travel for training or worse, because he’s been injured or killed since we last took the field. Football is a way of life for most that love the sport, but nothing supersedes the Corps. We’re Marines first, football players second, and if we’re lucky, we eventually get to be old men writing stories about our days with an Eagle, Globe, and Anchor on our helmets.

MIGHTY FIT

Hump Day: Games I would play in my head while hiking

Humping is a reality for many of us, and I’m not talking about the kind that has a happy ending. In my Marine Corps career, I estimate that I easily hiked 1,000 miles with a full pack — between 50 and 150 lbs. At a minimum speed of 3 miles an hour, that’s over 300 hours of time for the mind to go to dark or funny places.


These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Maybe slip on some ice…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Will Perkins)

Going internal

On a long hump, the mind so often goes dark. I remember envisioning the sweet relief of rolling an ankle so I could ride in the safety vehicle, even picking out the exact rock I was planning to eat shit on.

“That one….seriously, that one. Okay, fine, the next one… Ah, fine, I don’t wanna cause any serious damage. I’ll just take a header into that ditch and cause a concussion instead.”

On my 23rd birthday, I was on an 8-mile movement to a range for a live fire event. It was the second day in a row we were humping, and the entire epidermis of my right foot was already falling off, from the ball of my foot to the start of my heel, from the previous day’s movements. I had spent the previous weekend in Virginia beach drinking homemade Sangria, and the effects were still very much present.

I spent that entire hump in my own head questioning all of my life decisions.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

You know he’s thinking about the next ‘Avengers’ movie.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Careaf L. Henson)

Making it fun

Eventually, I got to the point in my career where I just accepted that I would be walking for the next 8 hours and decided to make it fun. Games I played:

  • Reliving every fight I’ve ever been in and how I would Jason Bourne my way to victory if it happened again.
  • During daylight hikes I would make up fake hand and arm signals and try to confuse people who took things too seriously.
  • I would secretly listen to music on my iPod (I’m old) through a strategically placed earbud. #combathunter
  • My roommate would use hikes as an opportunity to eat as much as he could; it was one of the few times you had enough “free time” to eat a full meal. The trick would be to figure out a way to use the heater packet while hiking. You need to jam it between your pack and back and focus on walking level, so it doesn’t fall out. Beware of the high potential for second-degree burns.
These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

“Hey! What was the name of the fat guy in The Office?”…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jessika Braden)

  • At one point, I wrote a new phonetic alphabet with just profanities. You can imagine what replaced Foxtrot. It was enlightening.
  • “A cougar is following you.” That’s just a game where you pretend a cougar is going to rip out your jugular as soon as you stop. The trick to this one is to think one step ahead of the mountain cat.
  • I would replace famous movie characters with my mom and see how the story would play out. It was never as entertaining, but always much more satisfying. If my mom took the place of Frodo in Lord of The Rings the opening scene would have also been the closing scene.
    • Gandalf shows up at night after dinner. Mom says, “What are you doing here? I’m busy, get out.” He counters “Lisa, you need to take the ring to Mordor to destr–” And, in classic Lisa fashion, she cuts him off mid-sentence with “That’s not my problem, now is it? Take it yourself.”
    • Roll credits.
These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Humping is a profession nearly as old as prostitution…

(Photo from the Thayer Soule Collection (COLL/2266) at the Archives Branch, Marine Corps History Division)

The right answer

Once I matured, I realized the right answer is to become externally motivated. I believe the jobs of the Platoon Commander and Platoon Sergeant are easier than the rifleman, because you are concerned with your Marines, rather than yourself. When your focus is pointed outward, time flies.

This lesson applies to every kind of difficult situation. Caring for others is one of the most selfish and least selfish things you can do. When it comes to hiking, if you focus externally, you get to push your own ailments aside until you are alone in your room, crying like a big dumb baby.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Keep moving forward…

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Aaron S. Patterson/Released)

In the gym, you are forced to confront your demons directly; there are no troops for you to look out for.

But in actuality, everything you do to make yourself better is also making the lives of those around you better. So, in a way, finishing a workout for your spouse or kids is no different than completing a movement for your unit.

Where are you in your hump day progression? Are you living in a world of regret and grief? Are you writing the next great American novel in your head? Or have you reached the point of hiking enlightenment and started checking on your guys and planning for their success when you reach your objective?

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now
MIGHTY FIT

Fantasy Football Playoffs After Action Report: Week 14

We’re doing things a little different this week. It’s playoff time, and that means that the lineup you have is pretty much the lineup you’re sticking with. Trade deadlines are done. So all of our assessments will be about player outlook over the next two weeks. The waiver wire is (mostly) picked clean, but if you had injuries, or if you have a player with rough matchups down the backstretch, look no further; we’re here to give you the edge you need to win that $140 office pool.


Austin Ekeler takes a screen pass in the flat from Philip Rivers and goes 84 yards untouched for a TD. #Chargers lead 31-3. #Jaguars have hit rock bottom. (via @NFL)pic.twitter.com/1qmLWHMwI4

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Interesting playoff must starts

Austin Ekeler, RB, Chargers- Austin Ekeler just racked up the rare running back triple-double: 100 yards receiving and 100 yards rushing in the same game. He was the top running back this week, is the #4 overall RB total, and he plays a questionable Minnesota defense next week, followed by an atrocious Oakland defense the following week. He’s a must start.

Ryan Tannehill, QB, Titans- Here’s an interesting stat for you: in the last four weeks, the only quarterback who has averaged more touchdowns per drive than Tannehill is Lamar Jackson. The Titans are white-hot, and it’s mostly in part to the stellar play of “Tan Marino.”

Allen Robinson, WR, Bears- Allen Robinson has the benefit of being the only offensive weapon on the entire Bears offense. This responsibility comes with insanely high usage, and therefore, fantasy value. He’s also going three straight games of +20 points.

Jared Cook, TE, Saints- Jared Cook had two catches on Sunday—both going for touchdowns. His huge frame and sure hands make him the perfect endzone target for an aging Drew Brees who’s catching his second wind. He has 4 touchdowns over the last four games on one of the highest scoring-offenses in the NFL.

Steelers D/ST- The Steelers are the #2 fantasy defense. After a slow start in the first three weeks, they’re averaging over 16 points a game. That includes 13 against the insanely dominant Baltimore offense, 19 against Indianapolis at their offensive peak, and 22 against a loaded Rams offense. They’re essentially matchup proof and, even better, they play the Jets on championship week.



When you started Mike Williams over AJ Brown in a playoff matchuppic.twitter.com/9qbEUXm0RB

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Potential waiver wire pickups

A.J. Brown, WR, Titans- A.J. Brown is the favorite target of the 2nd hottest quarterback in the NFL right now. He has deep threat ability (just ask Oakland after an 83 yarder he took to the house), and Derrick Henry forces linebackers and safeties to play underneath, exposing defenses. Go with the hot hand.

Raheem Mostert, RB, 49ers- Mostert is, for some reason, only rostered in 23% of leagues. The hesitation must be around the jumble in San Francisco’s backfield, but last Sunday, Mostert got the bulk of the carries and was by far the leading fantasy back for the 49ers. He has +20 points in the last two games, and the ESPN app keeps downplaying him for some reason, so he remains on the waivers. Worth a move if you are short a back.

Deandre Washington, RB, Raiders- Most people thought Washington would split carries with Jalen Richard when Josh Jacobs’ last-second scratch showed up on the injury report. They were mostly wrong—as Washington was used as the feature back in a lopsided affair against the Titans. While that may have been a last-second gameplan adjustment (I.e. simply swapping Jacobs usage for Washington) is left to be seen. However, if you have Jacobs, he is a solid handcuff.

Drew Lock, QB, Broncos- Well, the Broncos may have found their quarterback of the future. Since taking over, their offense has flourished and opened up. He plays against the vulnerable KC and Detroit defenses the next two weeks, and for quarterback streamers who missed the boat on Tannehill, he may be the edge you’re looking for.

Me putting Terry McLaurin back in dfs lineups this weekpic.twitter.com/bRY4Omnl9b

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Playoff fool’s gold

Emmanuel Sanders, WR, 49ers- Emmanuel Sanders is the beneficiary of some fireworks and trickery recently. His growth, however, does not seem sustainable. There are simply too many weapons in the San Francisco arsenal, and Sanders only has boom or bust potential. Sure his 30+ point week was an insane key to many wins across fantasy football this week, but I’ll bet his sub 10 point performance next week will be the cause for a lot of wins. The last time he posted a 20+ game was week 9… He followed it with four straight games with less than 10.

Devin Singletary, RB, Bills- Devin Singletary has been a great fantasy running back this year. He’s going on three straight 17+ point games. Then why our hesitation? Matchups. He plays the two best defenses in the NFL in New England and Pittsburgh the next two weeks. Buffalo will be playing from behind, and most likely, not scoring many touchdowns at all. He is a flex play with a low floor.

Terry McLaurin, WR, Redskins- McLaurin finally caught a touchdown from Haskins. The two have not found their rhythm this year, and this last Sunday seems like (on paper) a step in the right direction. That is, unless you watched the game footage—McLaurin had to make insane catches to post any kind of a worthy performance. That kind of performance simply isn’t reliable in fantasy, and until Haskins proves to be a more efficient passer, McLaurin is a risky start.

Robert Woods, WR, Rams- Robert Woods scored his first touchdown of the season Sunday night. Goff just prefers Kupp (7) and Gurley (10). So he may be somewhat valuable in PPR leagues, but his recent uptick in numbers could be the glittering of fool’s gold. Proceed with measured caution.


Ryan Tannehill with the hit stick after he threw the pick (via @NFL)pic.twitter.com/UTmnvvWWio

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Badass hit of the week

Ryan Tannehill

In a “Badass Hit of the Week” first, a QUARTERBACK has made the cut. The NFL is so soft at this point that the only position that can lay the wood without getting a flag might be a quarterback anyway. Ryan Tannehill has been so good lately that the most impressive part of a 55-yard interception by a defensive tackle is the textbook schlacking that he gives at the end of the play. Play to the whistle, fellas.

MIGHTY FIT

Fantasy Football After Action Report: Week 6

Key veterans shake off the early season slumps.


Stefon Diggs 62 yards for 6!! He looked back at the Philly D as he went into the end zone #PHIvsMINpic.twitter.com/LD7UKquJsA

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Blue chip medal

Stefon Diggs, WR, Vikings- Diggs went into week 6 as the 47th ranked receiver in fantasy football. He left as the 18th. That’s thanks in part to his 48 point (the highest of any fantasy player) week. 11 catches, 167 yards, and three touchdowns. Although the Eagles were dealing with a banged-up secondary— Kirk Cousins finally returned to his gunslinging “you like that?!” days of yesteryear. Is Diggs back, or is he tempting trade bait?

Patriots defense- The Patriots have the best defense in the NFL, and it’s not even close. They’ve racked up 122 points through the first 6 weeks of the season. That’s the highest fantasy total for a defense through the first 6 weeks since the 1987 Chicago Bears. They’re well rounded, fast, and deep. They also benefit from a cupcake schedule. As always.

Lamar Jackson, QB, Ravens- Lamar Jackson bounced back this week, and continued his MVP conversation year. While he displayed efficient passing abilities (236 yards on 22 for 33), his fantasy damage came with his legs. He ran for 152 yards and a touchdown. Those are RB1 numbers, and he ain’t even a running back.

Chris Godwin, WR, Bucs- One of the biggest fantasy surprises this year, Chris Godwin, continues his tear through the NFL. He’s the #1 PPR WR in the NFL so far (and he’s leading by almost 28 points). Although he didn’t find the endzone, he has more than 125 yards in his last three games. He’s the real deal, and he’s here to stay.
Melvin Gordon is still in the preseason… #PITvsLAC | #NFLSundaypic.twitter.com/gLCc5Uy4tt

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Loss of rank

Melvin Gordon, RB, Chargers- Fantasy owners that gambled on Gordon ending his hold out were ecstatic to see their efforts pay off two weeks ago with his announced return. However, most of them (including us) did not plan for him to do diddly-squat once he was back. In fact, Ekeler has been a more usable fantasy RB since his return, which isn’t saying much. It’s not too late to trade him to the “Taco” of your league. Go for it.

Juju Smith-Schuster, WR, Steelers- Poor JuJu has lost his 1st and 2nd string quarterbacks. The Steelers offense applied a very conservative offense approach (much to the benefit of James Conner owners) that hurt JuJu’s potential fantasy value greatly. Monitor Mason Rudolph’s progress moving forward, because as long as Hodges is under center, JuJu is a real liability on a fantasy roster.

Joe Mixon, RB, Bengals- Man, the Bengals suck. Mixon’s fantasy value has plummeted massively because of it. The Bengals are playing from behind around 85% of the time, and cannot rely on the run game late in the game, because they have to pass out of their deficit. This, compiled with their piss-poor offensive line play, has crippled Mixon from a fantasy standpoint. His only hope now is for a rally from Cincinnati in the second half of the season.

Tyler Boyd, WR, Bengals- Man, the Bengals suck (repeated for the people in the back). Tyler Boyd’s hot start to the season went cold for a week. He caught 3 of 7 targets for only 10 yards as the Ravens doused the Bengals. AJ Green is coming back soon to reclaim the lion-share of targets, and the Jaguars defense is looming next. Ship him if you can.

SAM DARNOLD IS BACK. 92-yard throw to Robby Anderson for SIX. (via @NFLonCBS)pic.twitter.com/EisIL1NfTP

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Promotion watch

Alshon Jeffery, WR, Eagles- Jeffery was a ray of sunshine for the Eagles on Sunday. He hauled in 10 catches for 76 yards and a touchdown. His momentum may continue against a questionable Dallas secondary in week 7, especially since Wentz seems to be playing much closer to pre-injury days.

Curtis Samuel, WR, Panthers- Samuel racked up 23.8 points in the Panthers London debut. Carolina’s offense, thanks to the explosive play of CMC, is looking more and more lethal, and Samuel has become the go-to guy through the air. The Panthers are undefeated since starting Kyle Allen in place of a hobbled Cam Newton, and show no signs of slowing down.

Adrian Peterson, RB, Redskins- AP racked up a 100+ yard rushing day on the road to 15 points. The old man is the only glimmer outside of Terry McLaurin on this terrible Redskins team. He benefited from a matchup with the equally impotent Dolphins, but is unfortunately in for a rude awakening for his next three games: the 49ers, Vikings, and Bills.

Sam Darnold, QB, Jets- Darnold didn’t die! In fact, he was living! He posted an outstanding 338 yards passing and 2 TDs in his return from a bout of mono. He has a real test against New England next week, but anybody who owns a Jets offensive player should be rejoicing at the thought of Darnold returning to the helm for the rest of the season.


https://twitter.com/FTBeard11/statuses/1183561495054970881
Thomas Davis with the SLAM! pic.twitter.com/zQeBiQe8sW

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Badass hit of the week

Thomas Davis Sr

Don’t try to hurdle around Thomas Davis Sr. He does not care that he is 78 years old, he will end you. This came off the heels of a 15-yard unnecessary roughness call against the stalwart defender. The penalty only served to fuel his anger, and you won’t like him when he’s angry.

MIGHTY FIT

High Intensity Tactical Training (HITT) vs High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

I led multiple combat conditioning programs in the Marine Corps, and I did my Martial Arts Instructor Certification at the MACE in Quantico with the creators of MCMAP. Yet, I had no idea what HITT was. I thought it was just a cheap rip-off of HIIT that the Marine Corps wanted to get their proprietary mitts on.

I was a little salty at certain points in my career.

The short of it is: HIIT is a type of workout and HITT is a comprehensive program that encompasses all aspects of fitness.


These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

A few seconds of this, a few seconds of that…

What HIIT is

High-Intensity interval training (HIIT) really got popular when the Tabata method got some good press. The Tabata method is a type of HIIT workout where you perform a movement for 20 seconds and then rest for 10 seconds. You repeat this sequence for as many rounds as you are adapted to.

Other styles of HIIT follow the same basic layout. You perform a movement for a certain period of time, and then you rest for about half the time you did the movement for.

If you are really particular, you would measure your heart rate and rest until your heart rate gets to about 60% of your estimated maximum heart rate.

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/BjzcNion5Qq/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link expand=1]Michael Gregory on Instagram: “Here’s how to do a HIIT workout properly. . A lot of people do “HIIT” but they don’t understand the purpose. It’s to to boost your output…”

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It might sound like math class, and it basically is. There are plenty of apps and timers out there for HIIT workouts, but most people just wing it.

In fact, most people completely miss the point of HIIT.

At its base, HIIT is a fat burning workout that takes advantage of the anaerobic fuel systems of the body. If you don’t allow your heart rate to get down low enough between sets, you are preventing your body from truly resting. Without enough rest, you cannot perform at 90-100%+ effort, and therefore miss out on burning a maximum amount of fat.

I can and will go more in-depth on this topic in the future. Take a look at the above Instagram post for details on how to properly use HIIT to help you lose that adorable baby fat on your tummy.

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Run fast and lift heavy. Sounds pretty good to me.

(Photo by Capt. Colleen McFadden)

What HITT is

High-Intensity Tactical Training, on the other hand, is a program designed by the Marine Corps to prepare Marines for combat. You can read the whole methodology behind it here.

It has 3 basic principles:

  1. Prevent potential for injury
  2. Increase performance levels that support combat specific tasks
  3. Build strength, optimize mobility, and increase speed

Subtle how they squeezed five principles into three, but I’ll roll with it.

High Intensity Tactical Training (HITT) Promo Video- USMC

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I’d argue that these components should be the base of every single human being’s training plan, not just military personnel. I would just switch the wording around in number two to read “increase performance levels to support career specific tasks” for the normies.

Reading through the methodology, linked above, I could nitpick some of the specifics of the program. Ultimately though, I’m a fan.

Unlike HIIT, HITT has nothing to do with burning fat whatsoever. Actually, it would probably be in a Marine’s favor to keep a modest amount of body fat on their frame in case things go south and they are without food for multiple days.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

The next step is to do the workout with a full combat load. That’s HITT.

(Photo by Capt. Colleen McFadden)

Execution is everything

HIIT and HITT couldn’t be more different. HIIT is for people who are primarily concerned with how they look while HITT is for Marines who want to f*ck sh*t up.

Both of these can be very beneficial to you depending on what you are trying to achieve.

Military personnel don’t have the luxury of knowing exactly what they are getting themselves into with a deployment until they get there. A well-rounded plan, like HITT, that increases all aspects of fitness is ideal if you have the time.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Don’t let this image fool you. This man’s primary form of exercise is not HIIT. He lifts.

(Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash)

HITT is for someone who is looking for long-term nonspecific training that will focus on all aspects of fitness. It doesn’t need to be just for those getting ready for a deployment.

HIIT is for someone who is looking to burn fat while maintaining lean muscle. That’s it for HIIT. It won’t make you stronger, it probably won’t make you much faster. It is exclusively for people who want to lose fat.

The bottom line of this showdown between fitness modalities is that the Marine Corps needs to get better at naming their programs. Otherwise, most people will just write off their highly researched program as a shameless government knock-off of something that already exists.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now
MIGHTY FIT

3 reasons you’re too much of a wuss to join this chick’s gym

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now
Military Muscle Gym (MMG) is located in Davie, FL, near Tampa.


You might recognize Kelsey De Santis as the Marine Corps martial arts chick who invited Justin Timberlake to her Marine Corps Birthday Ball, but did you know she also owns a gym in Florida?

Military Muscle Gym is located in Davie, near Miami, and boasts workouts that look a lot like a combination of Cross Fit and the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program with a little bit of boot camp sprinkled in.

And it’s too badass for you.

Why? I’m glad you asked:

1: It’s the Marine Corps and if you’re not a Marine, you’re probably going to break yourself. De Santis started the gym with three other Marines, two of whom are former infantrymen and one a former artilleryman. Their PT game is stronger than yours. Of course, you could try to prove me wrong here, in which case…

2: You might cry when the Marines wandering around the gym walk up behind you and “motivate” you to work harder. In fact, if you’re not crying by the end of your workout, you’re going to cry the next day when you wake up sore as hell.

3. You don’t want to get beat by a girl, and Kelsey is as hardcore as they come. Check out the video below, or the Facebook page for more info and pictures on what exactly is happening at Military Muscle Gym, and you’ll see just how awesome she is. Of course, if you do end up going, it doesn’t break you, you don’t cry, and you don’t mind being out performed by a girl, the teamwork might be a challenge.

Think you have what it takes to take on Military Muscle? Go try it out, and let us know what you think.

MIGHTY FIT

Sumo vs Conventional Deadlift

If this is a question you’ve ever wondered, look no further. I’ve provided you with all the information you need in order to make the smartest decision for your unique situation, even if that situation is fat loss.

First, let’s look at the pros and cons of each movement.


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A more horizontal back angle means more back involvement.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Piper A. Ballantine)

Conventional deadlift

The conventional deadlift is the answer to the question that asks: “Which movement allows me to move the most amount of weight with the most muscle mass over the longest range of motion.

It tends to work the hamstrings, back, and spinal erectors more than the sumo due to the more horizontal back angle of the starting position. Your hips are moving further, so the hip extensor muscles have more work to do.

If you have weak hamstrings and/poor hip flexibility, this movement will be harder. But that shouldn’t stop you from training it, The conventional deadlift will make you stronger in your hamstrings and more flexible in your hips over time.

Don’t switch to sumo just because your back hurts! Check this out first!

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Notice how vertical the shins are and how close the hips are to the bar.

(Photo by Alora Griffiths on Unsplash)

Sumo deadlift

The sumo deadlift takes a lot of stress off of your low back due to the more vertical back angle that you start the movement with. If you’re trying to get more leg work in your training, but your back is smoked, the sumo deadlift may be the way to go.

The wide-legged stance of the sumo deadlift artificially shortens your leg length. This allows you to bend at the hips less and bend at the knees more than in the conventional deadlift. That’s why there’s much more quad involvement in the sumo deadlift.

You should think of it more like a skill that you must practice. The sumo deadlift tends to take longer to set up, especially if you want to be good at it. The goal is to get your hips as close to the bar as possible so that you can take your back out of the movement as much as possible and shorten the distance the bar has to travel to lockout as much as possible. Those two things are achieved through proper form of the skill of sumo deadlifting.

Here’s how the trap bar deadlift fits in for you curious soldiers.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

That’s over 550 lbs lifted thanks to a strong posterior chain.

(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Charles Highland)

The conventional deadlift is in a category of its own.

The deadlift, which is a hip hinge exercise, is uniquely designed to work the muscles of the posterior chain. Those muscles include the hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors, lats, traps, and even calves. Those are the muscles you want to target when hip hinging.

In contrast, the sumo deadlift has a lot of quad involvement.

Often I’m asked if people should squat or deadlift. Conventional deadlift vs. sumo deadlift is a very similar question. Both the squat (especially high bar back squat and front squat) and the sumo deadlift recruit much more quad than the conventional deadlift.

This leaves the conventional deadlift in its own category. It lights up the entire back side of your body much more efficiently than any other lower body exercise. Especially if you perform it perfectly…

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Make no mistake the sumo deadlift is still difficult.

(Photo by Alora Griffiths on Unsplash)

When to sumo deadlift

There are three times you can consider adding the sumo deadlift to your training.

  • If you compete at powerlifting and the sumo deadlift is approved, then you should probably sumo deadlift.
  • If you want to get more hamstring and glute work but your back is sore from conventional deadlifting. This option assumes that you are conventional deadlifting at another time throughout the week.
  • If you want to get more quad work in and CAN’T squat. This shouldn’t last very long in your training program. Not liking squatting isn’t a good enough reason.

There you go. There are absolutely times to sumo deadlift, but for the majority of us, that isn’t all that often.

To keep this conversation going, be sure to join the Mighty Fit FB Group here.

Also, don’t forget to start training with the Mighty Fit Plan (It’s got plenty of deadlifting included by the way.). There are some big changes coming to the Mighty Fit Plan very soon, and you’ll be the first to hear about them by signing up now!

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now
These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now
MIGHTY FIT

Researchers: Drinking coffee might help prevent suicide, among other health benefits

Coffee gets credit for a lot of miraculous effects, whether deserved or not. It’s not going to stunt your growth, it won’t dehydrate you, and slamming coffee after a night of binge drinking won’t sober you up. Not even a little bit. 

No matter what “researchers” continually seem to find on the internet, there are some true facts that make coffee an important part of a balanced breakfast, like staying alive in a world that’s constantly trying to kill you. 

Drinking a good three to five cups per day will cut the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, it actually will hydrate you, and, most importantly (to this story at least), studies show coffee consumption cuts the risk of suicide by half

In a 2013 study, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health found that consuming more than one cup of a caffeinated beverage every day had a protective effect on the drinker’s risk of suicide. The public health professionals’ caffeinated beverage of choice was an 8-ounce cup of coffee.

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Coffee and ghee are a popular combination for the health-conscious coffee drinker. Photo courtesy of Black Rifle Coffee Company.

A sample population of more than 200,000 logged their food consumption in previous studies conducted by the school. Every four years over the span of 10 to 16 years, food use frequencies were tracked and measured. With a stunning 95% certainty, researchers found those who drank two to three cups of coffee every day cut their risk of suicide by almost half. Those who enjoyed four or more cut their risk by 53%. 

While Harvard isn’t the best public health school in America, it sounds convincing. Besides, not everyone can get into Johns Hopkins. 

It’s important to note that while Harvard chose to track all caffeinated beverages, it singled out coffee and decaffeinated coffee in the study, likely because the most common source of caffeine in America comes from coffee. But coffee studies have a long and troubled history.

In 1991, the World Health Organization added coffee to its list of possible carcinogens, or cancer-causing substances. If you need an idea of how much anyone listens to the WHO, just look at the spread of COVID-19. Or consider the fact that the very next year, half of Americans over 10 were drinking at least one cup every day.

Though one researcher was brave enough to tell the medical community they were wrong in 1992, coffee wasn’t exonerated until 2016. The WHO was forced to reverse itself and report that it may, in fact, be beneficial. Apparently the original study forgot to account for coffee drinkers who were also smokers.  

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“When these studies originally got started, back in the ’50s and the ’60s, it would be difficult to find an adult in this country that didn’t start their day off without having a cigarette and a cup of coffee,” Dr. Roy A. Jensen, the director of the University of Kansas Cancer Center, told the PBS show Nova.

Coffee drinkers everywhere are still waiting for the apology.

When it comes to cancer, the prairie-dogging caused by your first cups of the day is coffee speeding up the digestive system and cleaning out carcinogenic substances in your colon. Antioxidants in coffee ease inflammation, which is a risk factor for many kinds of cancer, especially in the liver.

The same antioxidants protecting your liquor processing unit are at work in the brain, increasing alertness and acting as a natural antidepressant. In fact, drinking coffee was found to decrease the risk of an early death by as much as 16%.

There are possible emotional side effects to drinking too much coffee, of course. The caffeine in coffee can leave you jittery, anxious, and rambling like an idiot after a point, usually after the average drinker’s fifth cup. 

So skip the decaf, stop at two to five cups, and enjoy the miracle of modern medicine.  

MIGHTY FIT

Setting expectations: what your home workout can and cannot do for you

If you typically workout at a gym, the mandatory closing of most establishments around the world has seriously changed your fitness routine. As a result, there’s a good chance you’ve at least thought about working out at home.

But before you continue your standard training plan, you have to be realistic about what you can achieve. Unless you have equipment that matches the options of your gym, there will be some compromise.


Understanding the limitations of your bodyweight or minimal-equipment workout plan is crucial. At least, if you hope to progress and maintain during this age of quarantine.

With this understanding, you can set realistic goals and train in ways that will help you achieve them.

Here are some factors to remember as you jump into the world of training at home with no equipment.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Impossible doesn’t mean impossible… think about it. What’s impossible for most may not apply to you.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Esgar Rojas

Muscle Building Expectations

If you have no equipment at home, the harsh reality is that building muscle with only your bodyweight will be challenging. Unfortunately, it’s even worse if you’re experienced with lifting weights.

Building muscle depends on progressive overload. In a nutshell, the body responds to resistance training by getting bigger and stronger, depending on how hard you train. But once your body responds, you have to throw more at it if you want to continue improving.

If you have experience with weight training, your muscles have grown to deal with these increased demands of weight, reps, and sets.

Now, you have only your bodyweight as resistance, which is a much lower stimulus than you usually achieve at the gym.

For instance, imagine the number of bodyweight squats you’d have to perform to match the stress and intensity of a 10-rep squat set with 315 pounds. And that’s just one set!

Importantly, if you have five or more years of consistent training under your belt, things will be challenging. Realistically, building additional size with only your body will be very difficult.

For you, you’ll need to train harder than you ever imagined if you have no resistance and want to build additional muscle.

If you have almost no experience with lifting weights, (which is unlikely) and want to begin working out, muscle growth will still be challenging, but possible. At least, as long as you make sure to practice progressive overload by adding exercises, sets, and reps.

If you’re lucky enough to have some equipment, like dumbbells, kettlebells, and a pull-up bar, building or maintaining muscle will be easier. However, don’t expect the same results as you would with a full gym at your disposal.

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Strength with a capital “S” is that which must me trained at your limit. It’s hard to find your limit at home unless you decide to lift your car.

U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ryan Lucas

Strength Building Expectations

If you’re experienced and strong, building and maintaining strength with only your bodyweight will be even more challenging than building muscle size.

Strength and muscle size are connected. However, strength depends more on how your nervous system reacts to heavy resistance. Without that resistance, strength gain is challenging.

Have you ever seen someone with incredible strength, despite being small? That’s because muscle size isn’t the only factor for strength.

Think of it this way: your muscle tissue is your hardware, and your strength ability is your software. Bigger muscles have the capacity to produce more strength, but you have to train correctly to use that potential.

Essentially, the physical act of trying to move heavy resistance is what teaches your body to get stronger. Without that heavy resistance, there’s nothing to tell your body to maintain or build strength.

Fortunately, performing explosive movements like high and long jumps will help your muscles maintain the ability to produce force rapidly. But, understand that explosive bodyweight jumps will never match the stimulus of a heavy and explosive squat or deadlift.

Here’s the takeaway: if you want to maintain your strength without equipment, try to incorporate explosive movements. These include things like:

  • Sprinting
  • High and long jumps
  • Contracting your muscles as forcefully as possible during exercises. (Including an explosive set or two in some of your workouts can do the trick here.)
These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

M240B is 27.5 lbs that’s a nice bit of extra resistance that would be frowned upon at your local Planet Fitness. Make the most with what you have.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Esgar Rojas

Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity

Luckily, it’s not all bad news.

If your cardio is lacking, you have an awesome opportunity to improve. That’s because aerobic and anaerobic capacities don’t rely on resistance.

Mostly, you can challenge and improve your cardio with little or no equipment, by just going for a run.

As another example, try performing 100 bodyweight squats with as little rest as possible. Then the next time, try 150. Challenges like this will stress both your aerobic and anaerobic systems and help you maintain and improve.

Best of all, even though your cardio still depends on progressive overload, you can practice this overload easily with no resistance. For example:

  • You can run longer
  • You can run faster and longer
  • You can take shorter rest periods between exercises
  • You can add more exercises
  • You can sprint uphill or downhill
  • You can add more squats per set

This list goes on.

The takeaway here is that building and maintaining muscle and strength with only your bodyweight will be challenging. Your cardio, however, doesn’t rely on external resistance. This factor makes cardio improvement a bit easier to achieve, especially if you have no equipment available.

These are the events on the Army CRT that you can prepare for now

Hold yourself accountable to training 6 times a week for two months then worry about results. You can only control your actions not the outcomes of them.

U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Timothy Shoemaker

Bubble burst?

Maybe, maybe not, maybe go fix yourself.

The fact of the matter is 90% of you fine readers should have just shrugged by the end of this article after realizing not much is changing since you don’t work out consistently or intensely enough. The other 10% are probably weight and power lifters. Chances are you lifting cults…errr, clubs never closed anyway.

Now, if your goal is to put on muscle while training at home you can still do it. Just get creative by finding “weights” around the house or check out one of the countless calisthenics strength training YouTube channels. With the internet at your fingertips you have no choice to feign ignorance. Start with AthleanX or my bodyweight program Back in Fighting Shape here if you’re absolutely experiencing paralysis by analysis.
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