Military Life

6 ways to have the best reenlistment ever

When you first enlist, there isn't much room in the process for you to get what you want. Yeah, you can choose your MOS and you'll probably get lucky with an enlistment bonus and some school options, but there's only so much a recruiter can get you. Once you're in for a few years and your reenlistment window opens, however, the retention NCO is the person you really want to sweet talk. Retention NCOs hold the real power — they'll move heaven and earth to keep troops in the unit and the military.


Keep in mind, the retention NCO isn't a wizard who can fix all your problems with a whisk of a pen. Whatever you do, don't ever confuse their willingness to work with you as an invitation to make demands. If you start holding your enlistment for ransom, you will get laughed out of the office.

Think of these more as poker chips for retention to ante up in exchange for you putting up more time in the military. The more valuable you are and the more time you are willing to give to the unit, the more "chips" they'll put down. If you're just Joe Schmoe hiding in the back of the platoon, don't expect more than a few of these.

6. Get into a school

An easy win you can score is the option to get into a school whenever the slot opens up. This is a pretty simple request since it doesn't involve HRC.

When a commander is notified that there's room in a school opening up, the retention NCO can shuffle your name up to the top of that list.

Just a tip: If you go to The Sabalauski Air Assault School, don't wear an 82nd patch. Just throwing that out there — but it will be hilarious for every 101st guy there. (U.S. Army Photo by Army Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton)

Related: These are the difference between Airborne and Air Assault

5. Choice of duty station

A key goal of the retention NCO is to keep the good troops in the unit, but if you request a change of duty station, they'll understand the bigger picture here is keeping you in the military.

A change of scenery might also give you a new perspective on the military as a whole.

You, too, can join in on the military tradition of hating your new duty station, loving your old one, and looking forward to the next one! (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Daylena S. Ricks)

4. Have fun with the ceremony

There are very few moments in anyone's military career where they have the power to dictate what they want and have it happen. Troops can have fun with where the reenlistment takes place, invite friends and family, and, for a brief period during the ceremony, you're technically "honorably discharged," so the enlistment period timer is set back to zero.

Of course, you can't do anything stupid because the ceremony isn't done yet and the command and retention will hem your ass up if you make a fool of yourself, but briefly "discharged" troops can laugh at the fact that they can finally put their hands in the pockets of their uniform for a whole ten seconds.

A CS Chamber sounds funny until you have to take your mask off to say the oath... (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Caleb Barrieau)

3. Help with promotion

This one is especially helpful for lower enlisted troops looking for a way to prove to the commander that they're ready to take the next step in the military.

Reenlisting indefinitely won't make your name appear on the Sergeant First Class List, but it can help an Army Specialist or Corporal get into the Sergeant board.

Retention can help you get to the board. You're on your own when you're there. (U.S. Army Courtesy Photo)

2. Change of MOS

Recruiters (usually) don't lie, but they don't shine a light on the reality of certain MOS. If you enlisted hoping for a fun and exciting time in that obscure MOS and now you're feeling some buyer's remorse, you can finally reclass.

I mean, you can finally learn that everyone has to embrace the suck: just some more than others.

Every Marine may be a rifleman, but being a "water dog" isn't nearly as fun as being an actual 0311. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jailine L. Martinez)

1. The money

Nothing sounds better than pure, hard-earned cash. The amount you can earn is dependent on a lot of factors, including available funds, time during the fiscal year, your MOS (or what MOS you want), and your time in service. But you can at least squeeze something out of Uncle Sam if you know how and when to push for a reenlistment bonus.

If you don't want to haggle for anything else on this list, at least get yourself some zeroes on that paperwork. Just be sure to reenlist while you're deployed in a combat zone so you can get that money tax-free.

Hey! You might finally be able to pay off that '69 Camaro you got at a 24% interest rate! (Photo by Cpl. Reece Lodder)