(Metro Goldwyn Mayer)

As the weather turns cooler and you look for yet another thing to help keep you sane while you're stuck indoors, might we suggest you return to the originals and re-watch any one of these classic Vietnam War movies.



1. First Blood

(Metro Goldwyn Mayer)

We're listing this one first to get it right out there in the open. Yes, we're talking about Rambo here, but in our humble opinion, First Blood is one of the best Vietnam War movies of all time. Don't believe us? Well, consider this.

The majority of Vietnam Veterans weren't given any kind of preferential treatment on their return to America. Discounts? Forget about them. Being thanked for their service? Not in a million years. That's one of the reasons why First Blood is such a standout Vietnam War movie – it shows a part of our country's history that many have forgotten forever. It helped educate the general public about the challenges of Vietnam Veterans, both in the field and once back at home, too.

2. Hamburger Hill

(RKO Pictures)

This gritty war movie focuses on 14 soldiers from the 101st B Company, 3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiments during a 12-day battle that occurred in the northern part of South Vietnam near the A Shau Valley.

Debuting in 1987, the film showcases what it was like for the Screaming Eagles as they endured an uphill battle against a well-entrenched enemy under awful conditions.

The real battle of Hamburger Hill claimed the lives of 39 soldiers from the 187th and left almost 300 wounded. This film absolutely holds up to any other film that attempts to explore the sacrifices made by infantrymen.

3. Platoon

(Metro Goldwyn Mayer)

Platoon won the "Best Film" of 1986 and for a good reason. This movie manages to explore combat from the ground level, and does what many war movies can't do – it shows the combat experience for exactly what it is: scary, full of dread and lots of worries. The reason this film manages to be successful where others aren't might be due in part to the fact that Oliver Stone, who wrote and directed it, was a Vietnam Veteran. In interviews, Stone said that he was just trying to make a film for himself and for those like him, to remember the war for exactly what it was.

4. Rolling Thunder

(American International Pictures)

This one might not be on your radar, in part because it's a low-budget movie that never won any awards. It was written by the same person who wrote Raging Bull and Taxi Driver and an unknown director. The result is a film that's part war rage and part revenge fantasy and is probably relatable for most Vietnam Veterans returning from war.

Two POWs get a hero's welcome upon returning to Texas, but things fall apart immediately after and only go from bad to worse. The movie traces these two characters' lives as they come to terms with understanding their new normal.

This is the kind of movie that will completely captivate you and tap into the frustration that many Vietnam war movies try to illustrate.

5. The Deer Hunter

(Universal Pictures)

The cast of The Deer Hunter elevates it into the cinematic hall of fame status. Starring Robert de Niro, Meryl Streep, and Christopher Walken, the cast is as impressive as the storyline. What further sets this film apart is the fact that John Cazale (Fredo from The Godfather) makes his last appearance before his death from bone cancer.

The harrowing POW sequences in this film are dark, gritty and utterly memorable. The Deer Hunter is one of those movies that will remain with you long after you've watched it.