There's an old military saying that goes, "if it's stupid and it works, it isn't stupid." As enlisted personnel rise through the ranks, they tend to encounter more and more questionable practices that somehow made their way into doctrine. This isn't anything new. Most of the veterans reading this encountered at least one "WTF Moment" in their military careers. Few of these bizarre scenarios will get a troop wounded or worse.

Then there are the tactics that could mean the difference between life and death – and you have to wonder who decided to do things that way and why do they hate their junior enlisted troops so much? These are those tactics.


1. "Walking Fire" with the Browning Automatic Rifle

When introduced in the closing days of World War I, the Browning Automatic Rifle – or "B-A-R" – was introduced as a means to get American troops across the large, deadly gaps called "no man's land" between the opposing trenches. The theory was that doughboys would use the BAR in a walking fire movement, slowly walking across the ground while firing the weapon from the hip.

Anyone who's ever used an automatic weapon has probably figured out by now that slowly sauntering across no man's land, shooting at anything that moves will run your ammo down before you ever get close to the enemy trench. It's probably best to stay in your own trench, which is what the Americans ended up doing anyway.

2. Soviet Anti-Tank Suicide Dogs

The concept seems sound enough. In the 1930s, the USSR trained dogs to wear explosive vests and run under oncoming tanks. In combat, the dogs would then be detonated while near the tank's soft underbelly. It seems like a good idea, right? Well, when it came time to use the dogs against Nazi tanks in World War II, the Soviets realized that training the dogs with Soviet tanks might have been a bad idea. The USSR's tanks ran on diesel while the Wehrmacht's ran on gasoline.

Soviet tank dogs, attracted to the smell of Soviet diesel fuel, ran under Soviet tanks instead of German tanks when unleashed, creating an explosives hazard for the Red Army tanks crews.

3. Flying Aircraft Carriers

In the interwar years, the U.S. military decided that airpower was indeed the wave of the military's future, and decided to experiment with a way to get aircraft flying as fast as possible. For this, they developed helium airships that housed hangers to hold a number of different airplanes. It seemed like a good idea in theory, but it turns out the air isn't as hospitable a place as the seas and flying, helium-borne craft aren't as stable as a solid, steel ship on the waves.

After the two aircraft carriers the Navy built both crashed, and 75 troops were dead, the military decided to go another way with aircraft.

4. Prodders

In World War II, there wasn't always a metal detector around. Sometimes, troops had to get down and dirty, literally. In areas where land mines were suspected, soldiers would get down on the ground, with their heads and bodies close to the ground and – without any kind of warning or hint of where mines might be, if there were any at all – poke into the ground at a 30-degree angle.

The angle helped avoid tripping the mines because the trigger mechanisms were usually located at the top of the mines. If the terrain was a bit looser, the mines could be raked up by the prodders instead.