Humor

7 ways barracks parties prepare you for college life

Alcohol and parties are commonplace in the military. Only troops can throw a raging party on a Thursday that destroys the barracks, instigate a platoon versus platoon fist fight, and involve the Colonel's hot 22-year-old daughter all while avoiding MPs being called and everyone making it to the 12-mile ruck in the morning. When those same troops get out and use their GI Bill, not a single one of them will be impressed when a classmate says, "Dude! This party is gonna be just like the film, Project X!"


Spoiler alert: It won't. Not until a college kid rips down a door just to use it as a beer pong table will it even come close. Only a veteran with a DD-214 still warm from the printer can get that party going.

Here are 7 ways barracks parties get you ready for college life.

7. You can actually get the party started!

Veteran students are often seen as the most charismatic bunch. It's not because we're the most social people, we just don't give a damn what people think of us.

This can lead others to follow us — especially to parties. Veterans won't ever let those college kids down.

How every veteran shows up to the party. (Image from Columbia Pictures' 22 Jump Street)

6. You can entertain everyone, from every walk of life

Part of military life is meeting everyone from every corner of the country (in some cases, the world) and getting them drunk. If you want to see a beautiful photo of every race, ethnicity, religion, gender, economic status, and overall place in life, just check out the barracks on any given payday weekend. They'll all be wasted and probably a few will have their shirts off.

College campuses usually have that same makeup, but veterans can bridge that gap... with copious amounts of alcohol.

Well, Wayne Gretzky did say, "you miss 100% of the shots you don't take." (Image via GIPHY)

5. You'll actually know how to talk to the person you're interested in

On or around military installations, to put it frankly, there aren't that many beautiful women. If there is one, troops will literally fight each other for the chance to talk to her.

Take that same veteran, who needed to perfect the art of talking to the other sex, give them a strong personality and a good looking body, and let them loose.

We don't even need to use BAH as a pick-up line anymore! (Image via GIPHY)

4. You'll know how to hold your liquor

It takes a lot to get troops drunk. The general rule of thumb is to bring as much as you plan on drinking and then some extra. This results in troops coming to parties with bottles upons bottle of booze. All that, and they'll still probably be just at the upper limit of tipsy or at least can pretend well enough that they aren't sh*tfaced.

Don't be surprised when a veteran downs an entire bottle of whiskey, straight, no chaser, and then asks who's down for shots.

Civilians think they can drink. That's cute. (Image via GIPHY)

 

3. You'll know how to babysit

Troops always look after one another at barracks parties. We needed to make sure that no one got in trouble and that no one chokes on their own puke. When a situation arises, troops can snap back to sobriety well enough to handle it.

Being the only ones who can hold their liquor also means they'll be sober enough to deal with everyone else's problems when they're drunk. And it's never a fun problem like, "we need to hide the colonel's hot 22-year old daughter! Dad's on his way!" It's always boring, civilian problems.

Vets will always carry you home. Mostly to flex for the ladies. (Image via GIPHY)

2. You'll know how to make the next one even bigger

Troops have astounding drunken memory. They probably couldn't tell you why they did what they did, but they can remember doing it.

Veterans will take mental notes as if they were a staff officer. They'll check off what alcohol people actually drank, which music worked best, and who to invite (and not invite) next time.

A vet probably wouldn't be joking though... (Image via GIPHY)

1. You can still make it to class the next day

Hangovers still exist. That's just the way it is when you start adding more birthdays to your life. Troops just keep their mouths shut about it because they know they probably shouldn't have drank an entire handle the night before an 0530 PT test.

When the only stressor is being able to make it to a 9 a.m. class to listen to a math lecture, veterans will probably still make it there fifteen minutes early.

We worked too damn hard to throw away an opportunity at college. (Image via Reddit)

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