The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks) - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

From the way people talk to product ideas, the civilian world has learned plenty from the military. That’s certainly true for some business mascots who have taken on military ranks.


For some businesses, like Kentucky Fried Chicken’s “Col. Sanders,” the title does indeed have military roots. For others however, it seems to be nothing more than clever marketing. So we thought it’d be fun to research the actual military records, or put together what their records may have been, if we were writing the history.

Here we go:

“Col. Sanders” — Kentucky Fried Chicken

Born Harland David Sanders, the future “Col. Sanders” first got into the restaurant business by selling chicken and other dishes out of a Kentucky gas station in 1930. His popular “Sunday dinner, seven days a week” would become the basis for what we now know as Kentucky Fried Chicken.

But was he actually a colonel? Well, as it turns out, Sanders did have a brief stint in the U.S. Army in 1906, when he forged documents at the age of 16 and enlisted. He was sent to Cuba, but served only three months before his honorable discharge, according to Today I Found Out.

So it’s pretty safe to assume that “Col. Sanders” was actually a U.S. Army private. It was only after his business success that he picked up his colonel rank in 1949 from Kentucky Gov. Lawrence Wetherby, who awarded him the honorary title of “Kentucky Colonel.

Unfortunately, Sanders doesn’t have any cool Army stories or battlefield exploits, although he did shoot a guy working at a competing gas station once.

 

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

“Cap’n Crunch” — Quaker Oats

A much beloved cereal brand first introduced in 1963, “Cap’n Crunch” is the name of the cartoon character featured on the side of the box. But what’s the deal with the “Captain” claim? His full name is Cap’n Horatio Magellan Crunch and he apparently knows how to salute and wear a Navy uniform.

But in 2013 — and we’re totally not making this up — the Cap’n was called out for stolen valor after sleuths found him wearing the rank of a commander on his sleeve.

“We have no Cap’n Crunch in the personnel records – and we checked,” Lt. Commander Chris Servello, director of the U.S. Navy’s news desk at the Pentagon, told The Wall Street Journal. “We have notified NCIS and we’re looking into whether or not he’s impersonating a naval officer – and that’s a serious offense.”

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

“The General” — The General Automobile Insurance Services, Inc.

We looked far and wide for information on the cartoon mascot of “The General,” but came up short. According to the company’s website, The General Insurance was first started as Permanent General Insurance in 1963, but rebranded to its current form in 1997. It wasn’t until 2000 that the cartoon “General” made his first appearance.

A five-star general with a love for oversized cell phones, “The General” seems to have modeled himself after Gen. George S. Patton and has been seen wearing a similar outfit to the Army leader famous for his battlefield exploits during World War II.

Unfortunately, “The General” doesn’t seem to be legit. His mustache and eyebrows are way out of regulations, and the Army hasn’t awarded five star rank to anyone since Omar Bradley in 1950. That’s not to mention that the general’s uniform currently features a mixture of ribbons and a medal — a common problem seen among stolen valor types.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Photo: Youtube

“Sergent Major” — Sergent Major clothing

Started by French entrepreneur Paul Zemmour, Sergent Major is a children’s boutique fashion chain with stores throughout Europe, though most are in France.

As far as we were able to ascertain, Zemmour doesn’t appear to have any military service, so it looks like “Sergent Major” is a brand that has nothing to do with the military. Still, it would be way more interesting if the store was created by a guy named Sgt. Paul Major. In addition to confusing Duty NCO’s when he called and announced himself as Sgt. Major, he served time with the French Foreign Legion and later opened a children’s clothing store that would help him forget the horrors of war.

But hey, that’s not the case.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Photo: Centrometropoli

“Sgt. Grit” — Sgt. Grit Marine Specialties

Sgt. Grit is a popular clothing and accessories brand based in Oklahoma, and it is the only company on this list that can claim its branding as 100% legitimate. It was started by Don Whitton in 1988, borrowing the nickname he earned in Vietnam while serving as a Marine Corps radio operator with 11th Marines.

“I’d like to say it was because of my John Wayne type persona, but unfortunately, it was only because I was from Oklahoma,” Whitton writes on his website. Though he started out as Pvt. Grit in 1969, he eventually was promoted to Sgt. and the nickname followed with it.

His business started as just himself in his basement, but Grit now has more 25 employees and operates out of a 22,500 sq. ft. warehouse.

NOW: 9 military terms that will make you sound crazy around civilians

MIGHTY MOVIES

Leave your costumes at home when you visit Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge

If you want to wear a Jedi robe or a Stormtrooper helmet to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, you’ll likely get tossed into the Sarlaac Pit. Disney has released dress code guidelines for guests attending Galaxy’s Edge, and you’re going to have to leave your blasters and Darth Vader helmets at home or in the hotel.

On June 10, 2019, the official Disney Parks blog released specific guidelines around what is okay to wear at Galaxy’s Edge and what will get you on an Order 66-style blacklist. Essentially, anything that presents a safety issue will not be allowed, which means no helmets, masks, or big flowing clothes of any kind. Blasters and blaster holsters are also outlawed as are “full body suits” so if you’re planning on coming dress as Jar Jar Binks, that little Gugan vest is cool, but the masks and bug-eyes are a NO.


Here’s some good news: Lightsabers are allowed, which, let’s face it, is pretty civilized.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

(Disney Parks Blog)

In a small paradox, obviously some of the stuff you can’t wear inside Galaxy’s Edge can be purchased at Galaxy’s Edge. Plenty of the shops at Galaxy’s Edge sell helmets, masks, and blasters. But, the rule is you gotta keep that stuff in the package until you get back to your hotel room.

For any sane person, these rules totally make sense. Galaxy’s Edge might be a delightful hive of geek and nerdiness, but, in the end, Disneyland is for kids. And kids need to feel safe, even when they are traversing that lawless galaxy, far, far away.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

Articles

5 military-themed ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ books revisited

“Choose Your Own Adventure” books were an easy way to feel accomplished as a child. In a few short, simple pages, you could make the decisions which would ultimately kill your character and you could count it as an entire book read — all the way through. Book that, Pizza Hut.


If you had more time to kill or wanted to go on another adventure, you could just crack the book open again and find a new way to die. Either way, you know how these books end.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
There’s seriously no other way.

It should be simple to go back and revisit these books now that we have a lifetime of experience from which to help guide us and make decisions. Suddenly it’s a lot easier to break your friends out of Nazi Germany or get that secret message to George Washington. And now it all makes sense why your character died so often — some of these books give you absolutely terrible choices.

No matter what, it prepares you for a life of making bad life decisions.

1. Sabotage

No, they did not make a book from a Beastie Boys song (though that would have been awesome and could have explained so much). Sabotage places you in 1942 Casablanca, where you are an agent for Secret Forces. No country, just Secret Forces. You’re working with the French Resistance to break some friends out of a castle prison in Nazi Germany, but the notorious SS Agent Kruptsch is out to foil you.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

Your handler gives you an envelope you’re supposed to open when you’re about to enter the castle and sends you off with Resistance operatives Simone and Raoul. Getting to the castle is really difficult because the Germans keep surprising you. When you get to the castle, the envelope lets you know why: Raoul is a double agent. There’s no explanation for why Secret Forces let him continue being a double agent or why they didn’t tell you that in the first place. But that doesn’t matter because if you take too long getting to the castle, your friends escape on their own anyway. Thanks for your help, chummmmmmmmmp!

2. Spy for George Washington

The American Colonies are in open rebellion against Great Britain. You are too young to enlist as a Continental Soldier, so a man you know enlists you (a child) to deliver a message to General George Washington about the British attack on Philadelphia. That’s not nearly as dangerous, right?

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Benedict Arnold would have trouble with this.

You are given every opportunity to tell everyone from Royal Navy Captains to strangers on the street about your super secret mission. The book lets you make that choice. And every time you avoid direct confrontation, you are waylaid and/or eventually killed off. The lesson here is Americans don’t avoid fights, even as spies.

3. Gunfire at Gettysburg

You are a bossy jerk of a kid in 1863 Pennsylvania who is more than a little confused about the ongoing Civil War. On one hand, slavery is wrong, but on the other, the Rebels are fighting in their homeland. I’m not kidding, this is your rationale, your great conundrum.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

You just happen to be on the battlefield when the Battle of Gettysburg starts and your sociopath best friend implores you to stick around and watch for a while. You’re held at gunpoint by a Confederate officer who gives you the option of helping the Rebels with your knowledge of the local terrain or making a break for it. You consider helping the Confederates because — and I sh*t you not — you want to meet General Lee.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Sploosh. Apparently.

The author clearly has some kind of man crush on Robert E. Lee. With blazing speed you are given so many options to betray your country. If you try to help slaves escape, you lose. Eventually, you are staring, dumbfounded, as the battle rages around you. The endings where you actually survive always finish with a Southern loss, but your character always looks back wistfully at what might have been.

4. UN Adventure: Mission to Molowa

Only a book for kids would be naive enough to think the UN is anything more than a bureaucratic nightmare. But “to start on tomorrow’s paperwork, turn to page 91” doesn’t make for good reading.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
It looks like that mountain is giving birth to a Jeep.

Anyway, you are representing the U.S. in a model UN in New York. You meet a friend there named Achmed from the United Arab Emirates and a girl named Benati from Myanmar at a Middle Eastern restaurant down the street. For some reason the UN Secretary General calls on you three CHILDREN to solve a civil war in Africa and settle a nuclear arms deal with a dictator from a fictional breakaway Russian Republic.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
The U.S. President sends his kids to hotspots. Why not the UN Secretary General?

Achmed disappears entirely and you drive into Molowa in an armed convoy to negotiate with five warlords. In true UN fashion, unless you stop to talk, negotiate, or barter with people, you are either left to starve in the wilderness or are eaten by hippos.

5. Hostage!

You are on a field trip to Washington, DC when the Alarin Cartel, a crime syndicate, threatens the White House. Your bus is then taken captive by the worst terrorists ever. They immediately leave all hostages alone on the bus.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
You think Pablo Escobar would just leave you all there alone? That’s not how real cartels roll.

If you act unilaterally and immediately, you can escape in no time, leaving your classmates to whatever fate. The terrorists are after a deadly virus the government is making anyway — they don’t really care if anyone lives. In some endings, the virus is cured by antibiotics (which is medically impossible) and in others it spreads around the world.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
The first step toward zombies.

You will either work with the President of the United States to force a surrender (while completely glossing over this blatant American violation of the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention) or join the terrorists in South America. All in all, the only decisions you make are really awful, just like the ones you make in real life. At least the cartels have free booze.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Here’s proof that every group of military buddies mirrors the kids from the movie ‘The Sandlot’

The 1993 movie “The Sandlot” is a classic American coming-of-age story set in the early 1960s. It’s about nine boys spending their summer days playing baseball in an unkempt piece of land. Their summertime fun takes a wrong turn when the main protagonist of the movie, Scotty Smalls, hits his step-father’s baseball, signed by “The Sultan of Swat” Babe Ruth, into a yard protected by a massive dog known as “The Beast.” The boys must now help Smalls get the ball back before The Beast chews it to pieces. Each character in the film has a different personality and a different skill, but they are bound together by their love of baseball.


 

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

Groups of military friends are a lot like the Sandlot kids, especially when they are deployed to the “Sandbox” (mil-speak for the Middle East). And just like any group of friends, each person brings a different dynamic and trait to the group in order to complete a mission. No matter what era you served in, veterans can relate to having their group of battle buddies/shipmates be just like characters from this cult classic film:

Benny “The Jet” Rodriguez

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

Benny is the group’s leader and everyone looks up to him. He serves as a mentor to the others, especially Smalls. Benny is brave, smart, and a physically fit stud who can out hit and outrun every kid (as well as The Beast) with his trusty P.F. Flyers shoes on. Along with being a great player, Benny is friendly, humble, and a teacher. The best thing about “The Jet” is that he is wise beyond his years and willing to risk life and limb (for instance, hopping over the fence to challenge “The Beast” to get the ball back) to help his friends.

Military Friend: The Leader

Every group of military friends seems to have a clear leader. He or she seems to be good at everything they do. They are physically dominating and willing to take a risk for the betterment of the team. The group leader is not only awesome but selfless. For this person, it’s all about the team.

Scotty Smalls

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

 

Scotty Smalls is the new kid in the neighborhood trying to fit in. “The Jet” reaches out to him, like the good leader and person he is, and takes the new kid under his wing. Scotty is introduced to the rest of the guys, but the boys are not too keen on him at first due to his lack of baseball skill. Eventually, the team warms up to him, and is simply referred to him by his surname ‘Smalls.’ Although he is now a part of the team, the boys like to give him grief throughout the movie for his lack of understanding of common things like S’mores, chewing tobacco, and (of course) not knowing who Babe Ruth is. This frustration introduces the classic line “You’re killin’ me, Smalls!” Smalls gets the team into the situation or ‘pickle’ when he hits the baseball signed by “The Great Bambino” over the fence and into the grips of The Beast.

Military Friend: The New Guy/Gal

New people are always cycling into the military. Think of Smalls as the new private/airman joining the unit. The new kid lacks knowledge and always seem to be getting in some sort of dilemma that the rest of the group needs to get him/her out of. It can be frustrating. Despite the growing pains, the “Smalls” of a group of military friends eventually becomes a reliable member.

Hamilton “Ham” Porter

Despite the physique, Ham is the muscle of the team. Don’t let the chunks fool you, Ham is a good athlete and a classic home-run hitter. Ham can also flat out talk trash like the best of them, especially to anyone who challenges his friends. The character’s most famous scene is when he tells a rival ball player that he “plays ball like a girl,” a classic “drop mic” line. Ham tells it like it is and enjoys messing with his teammates from time to time.

Military Friend: The Enforcer

Every group of military buddies has an enforcer. This military friend is probably more muscularly defined than Ham’s “soft belly meat,” but the character traits are the same as the curly haired catcher. This friend will always stand up for his friends and is not afraid of anyone.

Michael “Squints” Palledorous

Squints likes to tell stories although he does seem to exaggerate many of his tales (especially when it comes to talking about “The Beast”). He even claimed the dog ate anywhere between 120-173 guys. (Talk about an imagination!) Squints may look like a classic nerd-bomber with his big-ass birth-control glasses and teeth – on the contrary, he is self-confident, cool, and ballsy. He is so daring, he even pretends to drown at the pool just to kiss his crush, Wendy Peffercorn, who is the prettiest girl in town.

Military Friend: The Storyteller

Veterans always seem to have that friend who likes to tell elaborate stories. Despite their size and look, this friend may also ooze confidence, even if they have eyewear bigger than their face.

Kenny DeNunez

With his signature fastball “The Heater,” Kenny DeNunez is the team’s pitcher. He is a dedicated and hard-working ballplayer second only to “The Jet” in terms of baseball skill. He is a solid teammate.

Military Friend: The Dependable One

Most groups of military battle buddies have a great worker who may lack a big personality but is reliable when he/she is needed most.

Alan “Yeah-Yeah” McClennan

Yeah-Yeah is a bit of a smart aleck who started many of his sentences with “Yeah-Yeah.” It’s a perfect nickname for him. He is also a bit of a daredevil when he attempted to retrieve the Ruth ball in an aerial style attack over the fence. It’s disclosed at the end of the film that “Yeah-Yeah” joins the military and later becomes a pioneer of bungee jumping.

Military Friend: The Smartass Daredevil

This friend likes to joke around and do dangerous activities. It is safe to say every group of military buddies has a “Yeah-Yeah” in their group. Maybe even more than one.

Bertram Grover Weeks

Bertram is an infielder who seems like a subdued character for most of the film, but then shows signs of a “bad boy” when he gives his friends some chewing tobacco.

Military Friend: The Quiet Rebel

Don’t mistake his quiet nature for his rebellious side.

Timmy Timmons

Timmy is the architect who helped built the group’s treehouse near the sandlot. He’s a thinker in many ways and comes up with the idea to do the aerial attack.

Military Friend: The Builder

This friend can make anything with spare material and some 550 cord.

Tommy “Repeat” Timmons

Tommy is the smallest kid of the group. He is also the most bothersome because he repeats everything his older brother Timmy says throughout the movie. It’s easy to forget Tommy except for this annoying habit.

Military friend: The Annoying One

Sometimes you just want to choke him out.

Military friends are a unique cast of characters who share a special bond, especially when serving in “The Sandbox.” Eventually, friends go their separate ways but the memories of their time together live “FOR-EV-ER!”

Follow Alex Licea on Twitter @alexlicea82

MIGHTY MOVIES

This is why there’s no excuse for Hollywood to screw up military uniforms

Every time a new Hollywood blockbuster comes out about the military, veterans and active duty service members get defensive — and for good reason.


The military is very detail-oriented and the veteran community can spot every mistake in technique, procedure, or uniform wear. It pains us watching films that can’t even get the amount of flags on our uniform correct.

Related: 62 glaring technical errors in ‘The Hurt Locker’

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

 

As much of a master craftsman as Stanley Kubrick was when creating films, he’s not without his flaws. For instance, that scene in Full Metal Jacket when Joker is doing pull-ups and then Private Pyle gets hell for not being able to do one.

But Gunny Hartman should have been on Joker’s ass just as much since none of his should have counted (although it could be argued that it was a character choice by late, great R. Lee Ermey, a former Marine Corps Drill Instructor and Hollywood’s truest bad ass, just so he could f*ck with Pyle sooner.)

The film doesn’t exactly shine the best light on the reality of the Vietnam War, but at least in Full Metal Jacket, the uniforms are on point. According to the original Title 10, Chapter 45 section 772 line (f), actors may wear armed forces uniforms as long as it does not intend to discredit that armed force, and in 1970 that condition was removed altogether.

Back in 1967, Daniel Jay Schacht put on a theatrical street performance in protest of the Vietnam War. He and two other actors put on a skit where he “shot” the others with squirt-guns filled with red liquid. It was highly disrespectful but he did manage to get the uniform correct. After being sentenced with a $250 fine and six months in prison, he brought it up to the Court of Appeals and eventually to the Supreme Court.

It was ruled that, as distasteful as it was, his performance was protected under the First Amendment. The Vietnam War protester inadvertently helped troops by taking away any excuse to not get our uniforms right in film, television, and theatrical performances. Now there is no gray area. Hollywood has no excuse to not get the uniforms right.

 

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

So what gives? There are far more films that try to portray troops as righteous as Superman, but have them pop their collar.

The reason films like Full Metal Jacket, Forrest Gump, American Sniper, and Thank You For Your Service get it right is because they handle the military with respect. The producers, director, and costume designers listen when the military advisor speaks. They hire costume designers like Keith Denny who have handled military films before to do it right.

Military advisors have been gaining more and more respect in the industry. Because without them, well, the film turns into a drinking game for troops and vets — and they do not hold back their vitriol.

MIGHTY TRENDING

7 amazing war books written by the men who fought there

We regularly read about wars both past and present. Yet there are few of us who truly know what it’s like to be there. The accounts below are told by the brave men and women who fought on the front lines, as well as those intrepid reporters who documented war in person. From World War II to the battlefields of Vietnam, these seven works provide insight into the triumphs and terrors of armed conflict.


7. We Were Soldiers Once… and Young

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

We Were Soldiers Once… and Young examines Ia Drang, one of the most significant and brutal battles of the Vietnam War. Written by Lt. Col. Harold Moore, with the help of journalist Joseph L. Galloway—the only journalist on the ground at la Drang—the book tells the harrowing tale of the American soldiers who never gave up, despite the devastation that surrounded them.

6. This Kind of War

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

The book that Defense Secretary James Mattis recently recommended in response to rising tensions in North Korea, This Kind of War analyzes the Korean War—as told by a man who was there. Often referred to as “the forgotten war,” Fehrenbach, who served as a U.S. Army officer during the war, provides a powerful reflection on its destruction and how unpreparedness led to the loss of so many lives.

5. Valor in Vietnam

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

Looking at the Vietnam War through the lens of those who were there, Valor in Vietnam offers 19 different stories of triumph and tragedy. Presented in chronological order, the accounts are emotional, intense, and personal.

4. Goodbye Vietnam

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

William Broyles’ memoir covers his life from the time he was a college student—hoping not to be drafted—to his service in Vietnam and his return to the country years later, in an attempt to come to terms with the bloody war. Though he was enrolled at Oxford when the Vietnam War began, Broyles realized he could not let his class or education stand in the way of his civic duty. He subsequently enrolled in the marines. And while he survived, he wasn’t able to move on until he confronted his past and returned to the former battlefields of Vietnam.

3. Eyewitness to World War II

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

This military bundle includes three books from Richard Tregaskis, a World War II reporter who bridged the gap between the soldiers on the front lines and those waiting at home. Including Guadalcanal Diary, Invasion Diary, and, John F. Kennedy and PT-109, Tregaskis, who travelled with the Allies during WWII, recounts the bravery and sacrifice he witnessed.

2. Special Ops

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

Orr Kelly, a journalist who served as a war correspondent in Vietnam, tells the stories of the military’s elite forces. The bundle includes Brave Men, Dark Waters; Never Fight Fair!; Hornet; and, From a Dark Sky. From the Navy SEALs to the US Air Force Special Operations, Kelly details the courage and resilience of these unique fighters. In Never Fight Fair!, the Navy SEALs tell us, in their own words, about the history of their special force and what it takes to be one of the elite.

1. In Pharaoh’s Army

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

A National Book Award finalist, In Pharaoh’s Army chronicles Tobias Wolff’s experiences as an army officer in the Vietnam War. Present during the Tet Offensive, one of the largest military campaigns that took place during the war, Wolff tells his story and how it has affected him both in and out of Vietnam.

Articles

Stars of ‘Deepwater Horizon’ visit Keesler Air Force Base

BILOXI, Miss. — The airmen of Keesler Air Force Base were treated to a special screening of the upcoming film ‘Deepwater Horizon,’ as well as a visit from stars Kate Hudson, Kurt Russell and director Pete Berg (‘Lone Survivor’).


“Deepwater Horizon” tells the story of an explosion and oil spill on an offshore oil rig of the same name. The 2010 incident in the Gulf of Mexico was one of the world’s largest man-made disasters. Berg’s film honors the brave men and women whose heroism would save many on board. Along with Russell and Hudson, the film stars Mark Wahlberg, John Malkovich, Gina Rodriguez, and Dylan O’Brien.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Kurt Russell, Pete Berg, and Kate Hudson with assembled airmen at Keesler Air Force Base. | Photo courtesy of Lionsgate

In addition introducing the screening, Hudson, Russell, and Berg spent time touring the base, meeting troops and their families along top ranking military officials and got an up close view WC-130J aircraft.

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Kurt Russell, Pete Berg, and Kate Hudson pose with assembled airmen in front of a WC-130J aircraft. | Photo courtesy of Lionsgate

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Kurt Russell meets an airman at Keesler Air Force Base. | Photo courtesy of Lionsgate

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)
Kate Hudson meets an airman at Keesler Air Force Base. | Photo courtesy of Lionsgate

‘Deepwater Horizon’ opens nationwide September 30. Watch the trailer below.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Watch the new Mortal Kombat red band trailer

“Throughout history different cultures all over the world reference a great tournament of champions. That dragon marking…I think it’s an invitation to fight for something known…as Mortal Kombat.”

In his feature film debut, director Simon McQuoid is rebooting Mortal Kombat and by the looks of this red band trailer (released simultaneously as the one approved for all audiences), he’s gonna be celebrating the over-the-top violence and gore the titular video games are known for. 

MMA fighter Cole Young will join fellow defenders of Earthrealm Liu Kang, Sonya Blade, Jax Briggs, and more in a tournament against supernatural kombatants like Shang Tsung, Sub-Zero, and Mileena.

WATCH THE TRAILER:

Based on one of the most popular video game franchises of all time, Mortal Kombat will be the first live-action installment since 1995’s Mortal Kombat and 1997’s shall we say less popular Mortal Kombat: Annihilation. The film will be rated R and it will feature game-accurate Fatalities — in fact, you can watch Kano rip a heart out in the trailer above. “Kano wins.”

“The Fatalities were always in from the get-go, there was never any question from anyone at all. There was no resistance from the studio. They wanted them, I wanted them. There’s a Fatality from Kano; he ripped someone’s heart out. But what was important to me was that even when the Fatalities arrived, we couldn’t just do a Fatality and have it mean nothing. It actually becomes an important ingredient in the rhythm of the action scene.” — Director Simon McQuoid

The secret war record of Col. Sanders (and other businesses using military ranks)

(Mortal Kombat | Warner Bros.)

Starring Joe Taslim as Sub-Zero, Jessica McNamee as Sonya Blade, Sisi Stringer as Mileena, and Lewis Tan as newcomer Cole Young, the film teases many promising moments for fans, including a fight between Scorpion (played by Hiroyuki Sanada) and Sub-Zero. McQuoid opens his film with the face-off, which he describes as a “pretty brutal, nasty fight.”

If nothing else, viewers can expect an action-packed film with centuries worth of lore, easter eggs, and blood. 
Mortal Kombat will hit HBO Max and theaters simultaneously on April 16, 2021.

Intel

Marine Corps vet turned Star Wars villain is hilarious in this SNL sketch

Adam Driver’s star is shining bright, thanks to the blockbuster success of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.


Related: Meet the Marine veteran turned ‘Star Wars’ villain

If you’ve seen the flick, then you know that his character, the evil Sith Lord Kylo Ren, has a bit of a temper. Some hilariously associate his character to being emo, which is fitting given the way he spoofed himself on Saturday Night Live. As the sketch goes, Kylo Ren infiltrates Starkiller Base Undercover Boss style as a radar technician to find out what his employees think of him. It turns out that the truth hurts, and Kylo reacts in typical Kylo fashion.

Watch:

MIGHTY MOVIES

The real-world air combat origins of ‘The Last Jedi’

This article contains spoilers. If you have not seen Star Wars: The Last Jedi yet, you may find it better to stop reading this article here and come back later.


Avoiding spoilers? Try this: 15 Star Wars memes we can all relate to

Hurtling toward the villain nation’s massive fortified Armageddon machine the hero-pilot has one chance, and one chance only, at hitting his target. Victory will mean one man will save his people, failure could mean a war that may lead to destruction of the planet. It is all or nothing, and this audacious attack could determine mankind’s survival.

It’s not a scene from writer/director Rian Johnson’s new film, Star Wars: The Last Jedi. That narrative is a dramatization of the real-world Operation Opera, the daring June 7, 1981 Israeli air raid on a nuclear reactor and atomic weapons fuel manufacturing facility at the Osirak nuclear reactor outside, Iraq.

This is just one example of art imitating air combat history in the new Hollywood blockbuster that hit theaters this past weekend and of nearly every previous film in the Star Wars series. Almost every intergalactic battle scene in the Star Wars films borrows heavily from actual air combat history. And if you are a fan of air combat history, some of the scenes in Star Wars: The Last Jedi may feel familiar.

Director Rian Johnson and the visual effects in The Last Jedi opened with a classic piece of air combat doctrine that has been seen many times in modern air combat. An attacking aircraft poses as performing one mission to deceive an enemy, act as a decoy and buy time before a secondary attack is launched. If this time-proven set of tactics sounds familiar, it is.

You may be recall the real-world tactics of “Wild Weasel” SAM suppression missions flown in Vietnam and Iraq. It may also bring memories of “Operation Bolo”, the audacious January 2, 1967 attack meant to destroy North Vietnam’s air force flown by USAF Colonel Robin Olds. Col. Olds’ F-4 Phantoms behaved like defenseless B-52 F-105 bombers over North Vietnam as decoys to lure enemy MiG-21s into attacking. When they did, Col. Olds’ fighters sprung their trap.

Another tactic shown in The Last Jedi was forcing an enemy, in this case the fictional First Order, to commit all of their air defense assets to an initial feint attack, thus revealing their sensors and depleting their ammunition before a larger, secondary attack is launched on the main objective. In the opening scene of The Last Jedi, one X-wing fighter distracts and delays the giant enemy First Order battle spacecraft until it can effectively fly inside and below its defenses, then opens an initial attack, suppressing defenses and paving the way for the main rebel attack force.

Visual effects throughout The Last Jedi include inspiration from real world air combat of every era and from other air combat movies. It’s widely known that Luke Skywalker’s strike mission against the Death Star in the original Star Wars, where he pilots his X-wing fighter down a narrow mechanical canyon for a precision strike on the gigantic Death Star, was inspired in part by the 1964 Walter Grauman and Cecil Ford film about WWII Royal Air Force Mosquito pilots, “633 Squadron.” The cockpit of the Millennium Falcon spacecraft was inspired to the WWII B-29 bomber.

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B-29 Cockpit. (Image Public Domain)

It is also rumored that George Lucas may have had inspiration from either visiting or seeing images from low flying training areas like the Mach Loop in Wales and especially the now-famous R-2508 complex now referred to even by the military as either the “Jedi Transition” or “Star Wars canyon” in Death Valley, California just outside the Nellis Test and Training Range.

Despite Director Rian Johnson’s often accurate inspirations from air and space combat, he does take liberal license with physics and reality in the The Last Jedi. Gravity is selective in the film. Gravity bombs fall down in space where there is no gravity. Spacecrafts fly in a symmetrical up and down orientation nonexistent in space, and combatants pass from space with no atmosphere into pressurized spacecraft.

Some of the characters in The Last Jedi need a refresher from their officer training as well, as specific orders from commanders are executed selectively- and often disobeyed entirely. In the real world that offense that would lead flight officers a stint in the brig- look at how much hot water Iceman and Goose got themselves into in Top Gun just for buzzing the tower. Further departure from reality is seen with the gun-like weapons (as well as the above mentioned gravity bombs) used in place of long range stand-off weapons.

But at the risk of being that annoying guy in the theater pointing out technical inaccuracies, these are the elements of fiction that separate meaty fantasy from the admittedly more accurate, and “dryer” plot lines of, for instance, a Tom Clancy story unfolding in a more rigid version of the real world.

Rian Johnson must have watched plenty of video of F-22 Raptor and Sukhoi Su-35 displays since the opening space-combat sequence in The Last Jedi shows X-Wing combat pilot Poe Dameron execute a very Sukhoi-esque horizontal tail slide to evade a pair of attacking First Order fighters.

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F-22 vs Su-35s We Are The Mighty | Lockheed Martin | Creative Commons

The cockpits in the X-Wing fighters are a mix of new technology including advanced weapons sights and side stick controls and old tech like toggle switches that somehow seem more visually dramatic to flip than using a touchscreen like the new F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

Speaking of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and its advanced onboard situational awareness and networking system, the BB-8 droid that accompanies X-Wing pilot Poe Dameron on his missions is really a mix of the F-35s advanced avionics including the Multifunction Advanced Datalink (MADL), the Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar and the Distributed Aperture System (DAS). These systems run aircraft diagnostics, keep the pilot informed about the aircraft health and tactical environment and help facilitate communications and systems operation through several command systems, in the case of the BB-8 droid on the X-Wing fighter, mostly using voice actuation.

Finally, if the large rebel bomber formation in the stunning opening battle scene in The Last Jedi feels visually familiar then you may liken it to footage and tales from the mass WWII bomber attacks over Germany and Japan by the allies, especially B-17 and B-24 strikes over Germany. The lumbering, mostly defenseless bomber stream attacks in tight formation under cover from X-Wing fighter escort, and suffers heavy losses. The bombers even feature a ball gun turret at the bottom of the spacecraft exactly like the one under a B-17 Flying Fortress.

Also Read: 15 Star Wars memes we can all relate to

Ball turret gunner Paige Tico becomes one of the first sacrificial heroes of The Last Jedi when she risks her life to release a huge stick of bombs in the last-ditch bomb run by the only surviving bomber in the opening attack on the First Order spacecraft. Paige Tico’s sister, Rose Tico, goes on to become a predominant hero of the film after she loses her sister in the heroic opening bombing raid.

You may also sense that the giant First Order Dreadnought Mandator-IV-class warship in “The Last Jedi” felt familiar. Design supervisor for The Last Jedi, Kevin Jenkins, revealed that inspiration for the Dreadnought warship came from several sources that included the WWII Japanese battleship Yamato. The Dreadnought was armed with two enormous orbital autocannons for large-scale bombardments and 24 point-defense remotely aimed anti-aircraft cannons on its dorsal surface. Dreadnought is also an enormous space gunnery platform at 7,669 meters long, that is more than 25,162.8 feet in length. Imagine a strategic attack space aircraft five miles long.

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All great fiction, including science fiction, is rooted in inspiration from the factual world, and Star Wars: The Last Jedi borrows significantly from the real world of air combat technology, tactics and history to weave a thrilling and visually sensational experience. In this way this film, and in fact, the entire Star Wars franchise, lives as a fitting and inspiring ode to air combat past, present and future and serves to inspire tomorrow’s real-world Jedi warriors.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Universal Pictures and Regal are giving over 14,000 vets and service members free tickets to ‘First Man’

On Thursday, October 11, more than 14,000 free tickets will be presented to U.S. veterans and active-duty service members for Universal’s First Man — at more than 500 Regal locations nationwide.

Each of the first 25 service members (per location) with valid, government-issued ID who request a ticket will be given free admission to the 7:00 p.m. preview screening (or first show). First Man, from Academy Award-winning director Damien Chazelle and star Ryan Gosling, arrives in theaters nationwide on October 12.


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“During his career as a Naval aviator, our dad flew 78 combat missions in the Korean War,” said Mark and Rick Armstrong. “The friendships he forged during those critical years remained deeply important to him all of his days. Freedom — much like landing on the moon — is an achievement that is hard fought and hard won, and it cannot be accomplished without the sacrifice of our men and women in uniform and their loved ones. We’d like to join Universal and Regal in thanking all our current and past veterans, as well as their families, for their brave service to this great nation.”

“As an Air Force veteran, I am proud to see this historical achievement from other veterans and NASA featured on the big screen. These military heroes are an incredible example of the courage and determination that allowed us to reach new heights in space exploration,” said Ken Thewes, CMO at Regal. “As a tribute to the courageous men and women in the armed forces, we are honored to offer complimentary tickets for active-duty military and veterans to be the first to see First Man at any participating Regal theatres.”

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(Universal Pictures)

The promotion will be available at all Regal theatres playing First Man. Free tickets will be available on a first-come, first-served basis and may be picked up at the Regal box office on October 11. Each guest must present a valid government-issued military ID to receive their ticket, with a limit of one free ticket for each military ID presented, while supplies last. This offer is valid for the 7:00 p.m. screening (or first showing) of the film on October 11, only.

“Neil Armstrong represents the best and bravest of humanity, and this film from director Damien Chazelle is stunning,” said Jim Orr, President, Distribution, Universal Pictures. “Early audiences have championed this new masterpiece, and we’re grateful that our partners at Regal have opened their doors to active-duty and retired service members with free tickets. We know these heroes will enjoy First Man, and we’re thrilled they’ll be among the first to experience it.”

MIGHTY MOVIES

The ‘Jack Ryan’ season 2 teaser promises a LOT of action

The Emmy nominated Amazon series ‘Jack Ryan’ returns August 31 with season two and the official teaser trailer is here to get you amped.

“After tracking a potentially suspicious shipment of illegal arms in the Venezuelan jungle, CIA Officer Jack Ryan heads down to South America to investigate. As Jack’s investigation threatens to uncover a far-reaching conspiracy, the President of Venezuela launches a counter-attack that hits home for Jack, leading him and his fellow operatives on a global mission spanning the United States, UK, Russia, and Venezuela to unravel the President’s nefarious plot and bring stability to a country on the brink of chaos.”

The stakes and stunts look much higher for Ryan, with roof jumps, IEDs, hand-to-hand combat, and of course, an enemy to outsmart.


Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan Season 2 – Official Teaser | Prime Video

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[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/B0WIIVxAHwN/ expand=1]Jack Ryan on Instagram: “Go inside the anatomy of a #JackRyan fight scene with @amazonprimevideo X-Ray.”

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Creators Carlton Cuse (Lost, Bates Motel) and Graham Roland (also a writer and Marine) came up with their own story for this version of the ‘Jack Ryan’ story, keeping it modern just as Tom Clancy, the author of the books upon which the show is created, is celebrated for.

“They were geopolitical thrillers of the moment,” Cuse told IndieWire. “When we started writing [our own story], we felt like telling a terrorist story was the right thing to do. There was probably no great existential crisis that the world was facing out there than terrorism, at that moment in time.”

[instagram https://www.instagram.com/p/Bxz85ZlHEeT/ expand=1]John Krasinski on Instagram: “TheMurphChallenge.com Memorial Day is coming up. No matter where you are or what you’re doing, please take a moment out of your day Monday…”

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John Krasinski, who plays the titular lead, is by now no stranger to military and law enforcement roles. His portrayal of ‘Jack Silva’ in 13 Hours elevated him out of The Office and into a uniform. His respect for the military has extended beyond the roles he plays.

Articles

Live out your Colonial Marine fantasies with the Nerf Aliens M41-A Blaster

“I wanna introduce you to a personal friend of mine,” Michael Biehn said as Corporal Hicks in the 1986 classic Aliens.

After that introduction, gun nuts around the world wanted to get their hands on the Colonial Marines’ M41A pulse rifle. With its oversized carrying handle, pump-action under-barrel grenade launcher and digital ammo counter, it’s one of the most iconic sci-fi weapons. And now you can add it to your arsenal…sort of.

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The M41-A Nerf Blaster is a faithful replica of the M41A pulse rifle (Hasbro)

To celebrate the movie’s 35th anniversary, Hasbro announced that the classic pulse rifle will be released as a Nerf gun. While some may have preferred to have a water gun like the Noveske Water Hog, it would have made the digital ammo counter much more difficult to include. That’s right, the digital ammo counter is functional.

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Watch your ammo count on full-auto (Hasbro)

Officially named the NERF LMTD ALIENS M41-A Blaster, this foam dart shooter is powered by four 1.5v C alkaline batteries and is fully automatic. Just hold down the trigger to unleash all 10 rounds from the flush-fit single stack magazine; the ammo counter will keep track for you. For those wanting a more faithful movie replica, the counter can be set to 99 (or the recommended 95 to prevent jamming) instead. The under-barrel launcher is also functional and can fire Nerf Mega darts. Each trigger pull of the M41-A is accompanied by a movie-accurate blasting sound effect too.

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If only M4s from the armory came in such nice packaging (Hasbro)

At 28 inches long, the Nerf replica is a faithful recreation of the original movie M41A. “With meticulous attention to detail, our designer captures the look and feel of one of the most memorable scenes in ALIEN franchise history,” Hasbro said. To keep its appearance as a toy, the Nerf blaster’s color scheme is borrowed from the Aliens Power Loader. Even the packaging bears great attention to detail including “embossing, dull and gloss finishing and movie-accurate details.”

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A Marine defends his position with a Nerf gun before he is overrun by school children at NAS Sigonella (Colorized) (USMC)

At $94.99, the M41-A isn’t a cheap way to get into your barracks Nerf war. Even then, Hasbro’s approximate shipping date is October 2022. But, for die-hard fans of the Aliens franchise, the NERF LMTD ALIENS M41-A Blaster is a must-have. Just make sure to lean into it.

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(Hasbro)
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