Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE

Why most people don't have what it takes to be a fighter pilot

What's not to love about being a fighter pilot? Even the troops who continually bash the Air Force get a little giddy when they hear the BRRRRT of an A-10 in combat. And when you actually meet a fighter pilot, you'll rarely see them without a huge smile on their face because they know they own the sky.

Sounds pretty sweet, right? Well, we're sorry to say, but you very likely don't make the cut. In order to even be considered for the lengthy training process that fighter pilots go through, you have to be in the top percentile of healthy, capable bodies.

If you're still curious how you'd stack up, check out the requirements below.


First and foremost, you begin your journey at the Military Entrance Processing Station, or MEPS. They'll check you for the disqualifying factors that apply to all service members and the additional qualifiers that dictate pilot selection.

Most people are well aware of the strict vision requirements of pilots, but it's much more intensive than a regular check-up at the optometrist. You cannot be color blind, which immediately disqualifies about 8.5 percent of the population, and you must have 20/20 vision uncorrected.

Now, clean off your glasses before you read this shocker: perfect vision is actually very uncommon. According to studies from The University of Iowa, a low 30 percent of the population enjoys 20/20 vision, uncorrected. It's also worth pointing out that, at this stage in the selection process, they disqualify those who have a history of hay fever, asthma, or allergies after the age of 12. You must also have a standing height of between 5'4" and 6'5" and a sitting height of 34 to 40 inches.

If you pass these, then you can start your journey at OCS... Then resume your pilot training requirements.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Stoltz)

Additionally, you must already be on your way to becoming an officer in the branch that you wish to fly with. Once you've completed your branch's officer training, you can finally submit your flight packet.

Then, there's the physical fitness exam. Everyone in the Air Force must undergo the USAF Physical Fitness Test, but fighter aircrews have a different, more difficult one, called the Fighter Aircrew Conditioning Test. This test gauges whether a candidates body will be able to withstand the insane amount of G-forces a fighter pilot endures.

Navy and Marine pilots must also undergo the Aviation Selection Test Battery and score among the highest. The test is extremely grueling and if you fail once, your chances of becoming a pilot drop significantly. Fail three times in your lifetime and you're never to be considered again.

You also need to be able to swim one mile in a flight suit. Good luck.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nicholas Benroth)

If you're smart enough, strong enough, and have good enough eyes, then you just might be selected to be begin the training to become a fighter pilot. That's right; your journey is just beginning.

To learn about these schools, the physical requirements, and more, check out this video from The Infographic Show.