Sparta Science is movement diagnostic software which is used to reduce injury risk and increase readiness. Although originally created with athletes in mind, the military is now on their list of clients.

Dr. Phil Wagner is the founder and CEO of Sparta Science. His personal experiences with injury and inadequate support led him to creating the company. "This whole thing really started because I played high school and college football and I kept getting injured, finally being told I couldn't play anymore. I moved to New Zealand to play rugby and the same thing happened. I finally said this is ridiculous…so I went to medical school," Wagner said.


After graduating with his medical degree with a focus in biomechanics, Wagner dove into how science could target injury reduction and assess risk for possible future injuries. "I said let's build this tech company that could gather data on how people move to better address rehab, performance and pain in general," he said. Wagner continued, "Our mission is people's movement as a vital sign. That's where the company and the product came out of and it's where we see ourselves fitting into, particularly in the military with the injuries we are seeing."

This country relies on all of its soldiers, airmen, sailors, marines and coast guardsmen to be mission ready at all times.

But they aren't.

Non-combat related musculoskeletal injuries account for a high percentage of why service members are undeployable, according to a study published in the Oxford Academic. In 2018, it was revealed that around 13-14% of the total force wasn't deployable.

Although these injuries are negatively impacting mission readiness, they are also leading to lifelong complications. Musculoskeletal injuries are leading the cause of long-term disability for service members.

The impacts of no longer being able to serve due to injuries or suffering after retirement from the service are far reaching. "Mental health, movement and pain is so connected," Wagner shared. He started working with the military after getting a call from Navy special forces asking if they could use it for their team.

"They had massive improvements the first year they did it, then they rolled it out to the other teams. I think for us, sports were our roots but our biggest growth and revenue comes from the government. It's really satisfying because there's so much more of a service and sacrifice approach that exists," Wagner explained.

Major General Malcom Frost (Ret) served in the United States Army for 31 years. From 2017-2019 he led the Army's Holistic and Fitness Revolution while he was the Commanding General of Initial Training for the Army. He was also responsible for developing the Army's new fitness test, which launched in late 2020.

"Physical fitness and readiness drive everything...We are ground soldiers who must be on terrain in combat, therefore physical fitness is a huge part of what we do," Frost said. He continued, "I would argue that we have neglected, in many ways, the most important weapon system in the United States Army and that is the soldier."

Frost explained that by ignoring science, having outdated fitness training facilities, lack of professional support and long waits for medical care following injury – service members are suffering. "We have really injured and hurt a lot of our soldiers," he said. He continued, "We were spending 500 million dollars a year just in musculoskeletal injuries alone for United States Army soldiers."

Sparta Science approached Frost not long after he retired. "They said, 'Hey, we would like to talk to you and understand the holistic fitness system better and show you what we [Sparta Science] can do,'" he said. So, Frost took a trip to California to visit their facility.

He was amazed at what he saw.

"Knowing how that could fit in, especially in the objective measurements side of the military, I thought it was the perfect match. So, I have been in the background helping them facilitate and move into the military channels to get Sparta on the map with leaders… I look at myself as the bridge," Frost explained. He continued, "For me it's exciting. I only get involved with organizations that I want to get involved with. They have to have a mission that I can get behind and where I can provide value. Sparta meets all of those in spades."

Currently, you can find Sparta Science being used within the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps.

So how does Sparta Science work exactly? According to their website, the person has to go through The Sparta Scan™ on their "force palate" machine. It will assess stability, balance and movement. Data is compiled and an individualized Movement Signature™ created. Sparta software then compares the results to the database to identify risk and pinpoint strengths. Then the system creates an individualized training plan to reduce injury risk and improve physical performance.

On July 21, 2020, the United States House of Representatives passed the National Defense Authorization Act for 2021. It includes provisions to create a commission to study the "force plate" technology and how it can increase the health and readiness of America's military. That report will be due back to congress in September of 2021 to evaluate possibly implementing Sparta Science technology throughout all of the Department of Defense.

"Looking five years from now, I want to see the line graph [of injuries] going down on a global level," Wagner shared. Frost agreed, "Sparta Science is a readiness multiplier".

Sparta Science appears to have a deep commitment to bringing this technology to every branch of service to reduce injury and increase mission readiness. With the recent passage of the NDAA and their continuing education efforts, they are well on their way.

To learn more about Sparta Science, click here.