MIGHTY CULTURE

6 hilarious ways to welcome the new 'butter bar' lieutenant

(U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Sarah Johnson)

You never really know what you're in for when welcoming a new guy to the unit. Sometimes, you get handed a young, clueless private who has no idea what they're in for. Sometimes, you get an apathetic specialist who's been in for a minute and they'll just wiggle right into the flow of things. Sometimes, you get a salty sergeant who's dead set on making your unit just like their last.

Nobody, however, brings joy to everyone in the ranks quite like a new second lieutenant — and it's not because everyone is just so excited to see them. It's because they make for the greatest punching bags in the military.


Literally everyone has a go at the second lieutenant. They're affectionately called "butter bars," both because their rank insignia looks like one and because they have about the same value as a stick of butter.

Whether it's done in good fun or out of spite, it's your duty to give the new butter bar a hard time. Looking for a little inspiration? Try on these ways of letting your new platoon leader that they're now one of you.

1. Smoke the hell out of them at PT

When new troops arrive at the unit, you'll most often meet them for the first time on the PT field. Butter bars have a tendency to make long-winded, elaborate presentations that sound something like, "Hi! My name Lt. FNG and I'm honored to be your new platoon leader!"

Get 'em.

By this point, you and the platoon have a certain, established rhythm for morning PT that the fresh-out-of-OCS lieutenant can't keep up with. Show no mercy and go a few extra laps around the company area. Your guys will be cool with it as long as they understand the joke, and the new butter bar will be absolutely gassed.

"Yeah. We totally run with vests on every day. Didn't they teach you anything at BOLC?"

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Benjamin Ingold)

2. Send them on a wild goose chase

The age-old tradition of sending the new guy to go find something that totally, 100%, absolutely exists isn't just for privates. It's open season for butter bars as well.

They probably won't fall for the old "get me an exhaust sample" trick — plus, if they did, they'd probably just delegate it down to someone else who would ruin the joke. Try something more creative, like "ask the supply NCO about getting you assigned your new PRYK-E6" if their E-6 platoon sergeant is sitting right there. The NCO will gladly walk them through if it means the potential to pawn the Lt. onto someone else.

But if the "exhaust sample" task does work on them... by all means, ask them to give the platoon a hand.

(Meme via US Army WTF Moments)

3. Introduce them to the actual chain of command

There's no denying the rank structure. Despite how it plays out, the lowliest second lieutenant technically outranks even the Sergeant Major of the Army. However — and that's with a huge "however" — that should never be confused with the structure of the chain of command.

If they ever mention that they outrank the battalion sergeant major, don't interfere — just observe. This will go one of two ways: That Lt. is about to get a boot shoved so far up their ass that they'll be tasting leather or (and personal experience has proven this to be hilarious) the sergeant major will stay calm and collected as they go and grab the battalion commander. The sgt. major then asks the commander what the f*ck, exactly, is wrong with their new guy. The commander then proceeds to chew their ass out.

No one is safe from the knife hand.

(Screengrab via YouTube)

4. Let them lead a land nav course

Lieutenants are generally trained to recite answers found in "the book" as they're written and land navigation is a skill that entirely almost relies on winging it.

Related: Why the 'Lost Lieutenant' jokes actually have some merit

But instead of just letting them lead the platoon into danger, establish dominance over them by going to a land nav course that you know inside and out. Let them think that they're holding the reins while you're in the background tossing jokes their way and keeping an ever-watchful eye on where you guys are actually heading.

Just try to fight every instinct in your body to just let them get lost. The commander won't look too highly on that.

(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Gary A. Witte)

5. Toss all the paperwork onto their desk

No one wants loads of crap on their hand receipts and now everyone has some poor fool to pawn them off on. You don't even have to feel guilty about doing this — it's basically their job to handle all of the paperwork while the platoon sergeant worries about training the troops.

For added measure, gather up all of the paperwork in one giant stack and drop it on their desk at once in that way that's typically reserved for comedy films. Enjoy watching the sorrow build in their eyes when they realize that it's not a joke and all that paperwork really does need to be done by final formation.

Remind them that every last drip pan, fire extinguisher, and piece of scrap in the motor pool now belongs to them. Because it does.

(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Christopher Dennis, 1st ABCT PAO, 1st Cav. Div.)

6. Eventually welcome them in

The military is one big, dysfunctional, family. We joke around with each other all the time, but there's a time and place for all of that — there's never time for legitimate hate or cruelty towards another person who raised their right hand.

Once the butter bar has taken their lashings, they can finally be welcomed in as the new platoon leader. Sure, feel free to offer the occasional jab here and there — but keep it all in good fun. The troops genuinely respect the new Lt. if they take it all in stride (or throw even better insults back).

What good is a family if you can't throw a little bit of shade at each other?

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tiffany Edwards)