In the fourth quarter of the 1963 Army-Navy game, Army's "Rollie" Stichweh faked a handoff and ran in the endzone for Army's final touchdown against Navy for that contest. The touchdown didn't change the outcome of a 21-15 loss for Army. What was special about it was the broadcast for the viewers at home.

CBS play-by-play commentator Lindsey Nelson had to tell people watching that Army didn't score twice – they were watching the future of sports television.


In the days before the Super Bowl was the game that brought America together for TV Sports' biggest day, the game that brought everyone to their televisions was the Army-Navy Game. In December 1963, the Army-Navy Game was airing just days after the assassination of President Kennedy shocked Americans to the core. And CBS Director Tony Verna brought a 1,300-pound behemoth of a machine to use for his broadcast.

Millions were watching, and this monster was either going to make or break the young director's career. Nelson was worried that the new technology might confuse people. So was Verna.

"There was the uncertainty about this game," says Jack Ford, a correspondent for CBS News. "How is it gonna be played? How are fans going to react to this?"

In those days, replay technology still took up to 15 minutes to get ready, far too long to rehash an individual football play. Verna's machine would be able to do it in 15 seconds when and if it worked. What happened during the game play was not as Verna had hoped. The machine mostly saw static, and when it did replay plays, there was a double exposure from what the crew had taped over, which was an old episode of I Love Lucy. As a result, Lucille Ball's face could be seen on the field during the replays.

But when it came down to it, Verna's machine did work, just in time to catch Army's last touchdown of the game. It was the only time fans saw the instant replay during that game, but it was revolutionary. One of the Dallas Cowboys' big executives, Tex Schramm, called Verna to congratulate him.

"He told me the significance of it, that I hadn't confused anybody, which Lindsay and I were worried about, certainly me," Verna told NPR later in life. "And he said, 'You didn't confuse anybody. It has great possibilities.' "