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The 14 best military non-fiction books of all-time

We here at WATM love putting together lists and rankings, so it makes sense for us create one for non-fiction books. We read quite often, and not surprisingly considering we're a bunch of military veterans, those books often deal with military topics.


These are our picks for best military non-fiction books of all-time. (If you'd like to see our picks for fiction, click here.) The books below are numbered but not in rank order. All of these are great reads.

1. "The Forever War" by Dexter Filkins

If you want to gain an understanding of America's war with radical Islamists, look no further than "The Forever War" by journalist Dexter Filkins. As a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, Filkins begins his book as the Taliban rises to power in Afghanistan, writes of the aftermath following the Sept. 11th attacks, and then continues through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Told from ground level by the only American journalist who reported on all of these events, Filkins does not write a neat history lesson. Instead, he tells individual stories of people — from ordinary citizens to soldiers — and how they are affected by the incidents that happen around them. He does it using beautiful prose, and with little bias.

A page from the chapter about Lance Cpl. William Miller in Dexter Filkins "The Forever War," to whom he dedicated the book.

2. "The Pentagon Wars" by James Burton

Former Air Force Col. James Burton gives the inside account of what it's like when the Pentagon wants to develop a new weapons system. Having spent 14 years in weapons acquisition and testing, Burton details his struggle during the development of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle with those above him who were often more interested in supporting defense contractors instead of troops in the field.

Burton spends much of the book writing of the small band of military reformers who worked hard trying to fix the problems of Pentagon procurement from the 1960s to the 1980s, and he suffered professionally for "rocking the boat" as a result. For example, after suggesting that the Bradley's armor should be tested against Soviet antitank weaponry, the Army — knowing it would never hold up — tried to get Burton transferred to Alaska. The very serious book also inspired a very funny movie made by HBO:

3. "Black Hawk Down" by Mark Bowden

Most people have seen the movie, but this is one of those times when you should definitely read the book. This brilliant account by journalist Mark Bowden tells the story of the Oct. 3, 1993 battle of Mogadishu, Somalia, when hundreds of elite U.S. Army soldiers fought back against thousands of militants when a routine mission went wrong.

With remarkable access, research, and interviews, Bowden recreates the battle minute-by-minute and perfectly captures the brutality of the fight and the heroism of those who fought and died there.

4. "One Bullet Away" by Nathaniel Fick

This book gives an inside look at the transformation that takes place from civilian to Marine Corps officer. A classics major at Dartmouth, Fick joins the Marines in 1998 an idealistic young man and leaves a battle-hardened and skilled leader after serving in Afghanistan and Iraq.

At times very personal and unpleasant, Fick's book recounts plenty of combat experiences. But that is not the real draw. His wonderful detailing of the training, mindset, and actions of Marine officers on today's battlefields makes this a must-read.

5. "Band of Brothers" by Stephen Ambrose

Historian Stephen Ambrose's account Easy Co. in "Band of Brothers" is quite simply, an account of ordinary men doing extraordinary things. The book — which later became a 10-part miniseries on HBO — takes readers from the unit's tough training in 1942 all the way to its liberation of Hitler's "Eagles Nest" in 1945.

"Band of Brothers illustrates what one of Ambrose's sources calls 'the secret attractions of war ... the delight in comradeship, the delight in destruction ... war as spectacle,' writes Tim Appelo in his review.

6. "We Were Soldiers Once... And Young" by Harold Moore and Joseph Galloway

One of the first significant engagements between American and Vietnamese forces in 1965 was also one of the most savage. The Battle of the Ia Drang Valley is told by Lt. Col. Moore and Galloway, a reporter who was there, and it serves as both a testament to the bravery and perseverance of the 450 men who fought back after being surrounded by 2,000 enemy troops.

While the book was later made into a movie, it's well-worth reading if only for the stories of Rick Rescorla, the platoon leader featured on the cover of the book whose nickname was "Hard Core."

Rick Rescorla

7. "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu

More than 2,000 years old and still relevant today, "The Art of War" is a must-read book on military theory and strategy. But its maxims can be applied by those far outside the combat arms. Tzu offers advice relevant to everyone from Army generals to CEOs.

"Absorb this book, and you can throw out all those contemporary books about management leadership," wrote Newsweek.

8. "Flyboys" by James Bradley

There have been many contemporary accounts written of World War II, but "Flyboys" manages to bring to light something that had remained hidden for nearly 60 years. James Bradley tells the story of nine Americans who were shot down in the Pacific off the island of Chichi Jima.

One of them, George H.W. Bush, was rescued. But what happened to the eight others was covered up and kept secret from their families by both the U.S. and Japanese governments. Bradley, who wrote "Flags of our Fathers," conducted extensive research and uncovered a story that has never been told before.

George H.W. Bush

9. "1776" by David McCullough

Written in a compelling narrative style, David McCullough's "1776" retells the year of America's birth in wonderful detail. McCullough is an incredible storyteller who puts you right there, feeling as if you are marching in the Continental Army.

From the Amazon description:

In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence—when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper.

10. "Generation Kill" by Evan Wright

As a reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, Evan Wright rode with the Marines of 1st Recon Battalion into Iraq in 2003. Embedded among the men, Wright captures the story of that first month of American invasion along with the grunt mindset, how the Marines interact, and captures the new generation of warriors that has emerged after 9/11.

Soldiers today are "on more intimate terms with the culture of the video games, reality TV shows and Internet porn than they are with their own families," Wright told Booklist (One 19-year-old corporal compares driving into an ambush to a Grand Theft Auto video game: "It was fucking cool.")

11. "The Outpost" by Jake Tapper

A monster of a book at 704 pages, journalist Jake Tapper tells a powerful story of an Afghan outpost that was doomed to fail even before soldiers built it. Beginning with the decision to build a combat outpost in Nuristan in 2006, Tapper reveals a series of bad decisions that would ultimately lead to a battle for survival at that outpost three years later — one that would see multiple soldiers earn the Medal of Honor for their heroism.

Known as Combat Outpost Keating, the story of the base is one that is worth reading. With its bestseller status, rave reviews by critics, and most importantly, the soldiers who fought there, it's safe to say "The Outpost" gets it right.

12. "On Killing" by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman

Found on many military reading lists, Grossman's "On Killing" is a landmark study of how soldiers face the reality of killing other humans in combat, and how military training overcomes their aversion to such an act.

A former West Point psychology professor, Grossman delves into the psychological costs of war and presents a compelling thesis that human beings have an instinctual aversion to killing. With this, he also shows how militaries overcome this central trait through conditioning and real-world training.

13. "The Guns of August" by Barbara Tuchman

This Pulitzer-Prize winning book is a masterpiece of military history. Delivering an account of the first month of World War I in 1914, Tuchman tells not just a war story, but an event that would upend the modern world.

"This was the last gasp of the Gilded Age, of Kings and Kaisers and Czars, of pointed or plumed hats, colored uniforms, and all the pomp and romance that went along with war," reads the publisher's description. "How quickly it all changed, and how horrible it became. Tuchman is masterful at portraying this abrupt change from 19th to 20th Century."

14. "The Good Soldiers" by David Finkel

Embedded among the soldiers of 2-16 Infantry as part of President Bush's last-chance "surge" in Iraq, journalist David Finkel captures the grim reality as troops face the chaotic, and often deadly, streets of Baghdad. The book often follows the overly-optimistic Col. Ralph Kauzlarich (motto: "It's all good").

But Finkel excels at capturing everyone up and down the chain-of-command, and tells their stories incredibly well. His book is less about big-picture surge strategy, and more about the soldiers on the ground who fought it. That is a very good thing.

Those are our picks. Did we miss one that you loved? Leave a recommendation in the comments.

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