MIGHTY MOVIES

5 military movie mistakes and how to fix them

It happens every single time a veteran sits down to watch a movie with friends and family. The civilians grab a bag of popcorn while the veteran starts biting their lower lip. The civilians start to enjoy themselves and the veteran starts offhandedly remarking on how "that's not how it actually happens."

Before you know it, the veteran hits pause and proceeds to give a full-length presentation on why the film is a disaster because they put the flag on the wrong side of the soldier's uniform.

Most of what makes a military film bad isn't intentional, of course. No one wants to spend millions on making a bad movie. But when done right, as so many have been before, troops and veterans will keep it on their top ten film list. So, Mr. Hollywood Producer, when you set out to make the next military blockbuster, use the following advice:


1. Hire a good military adviser (and listen to them)

This may come as a shock to some veterans, but there are people on film sets whose entire job is to point out what would and wouldn't happen in the real military. They're called military advisers. The great military films are made or broken by how much the cast and crew decide listen to said adviser.

On a magnificent film set, like Saving Private Ryan, for example, everyone from Steven Spielberg to the background extras listened to every single word Dale Dye spoke. A good adviser knows they're not on set to interrupt the creative team's ideas. If they speak up to say something is wrong, it's for a good reason.

I'm 100% certain that Dale Dye just knifehands his way into the wardrobe department and just makes his own characters because no one has the guts to tell him no — and I'm okay with this.

(Tristar Pictures)

2. Writing that reflects reality

When there's something fundamentally wrong with a film, it can often be traced back to the writer. One of the first things they tell up-and-coming screenwriters is, "you can make a bad movie from a good script, but you can't make a good movie from a bad script." And the best writers are those who can make is something feel authentic and realistic, no matter how extraordinary the setting.

Military films are no exception. The fact is, no two troops are the exactly same. This goes for every character in the film. Every character, lead or background, should be fully dimensional and the audience should have a reason to care if they get unexpectedly shot in Act 2B.

I mean, just because it's a war film doesn't mean you can get sloppy when writing characters. HBO managed an entire company of fully-developed soldiers over the span of one miniseries.

(HBO)

3. Don't expect a three-act character arc in the matter of one deployment

While we're still poking fun at writers, let's talk about the all-too-common problem of trying to turn real stories into scripts by shoehorning their actions into the Aristotelian structure. For those unfamiliar, this is your basic story of a random nobody becoming a legendary hero. Luke Skywalker did it — but it took him three movies, the loss of his mentor, and multiple failures to finally become a Jedi master.

Don't expect to apply that same structure to a biopic that begins with a troop being a nobody at basic training and ends with them becoming a battlefield legend. In fact, some of the greatest war films rely on something simple, like "we need to go get this guy" to carry the story. A good story doesn't need to be humongous in scope to be compelling.

It's funny because "get this guy" can apply to damn near every military film.

(Warner Bros. Pictures)

4. Use authentic wardrobe

Despite how it may seem, there is no law that states that you must mess up uniforms if you're to use them in a film. In fact, there's actually a Supreme Court ruling that states you can use real uniforms in the arts — so there's no excuse.

Use a military adviser and give them a say in the wardrobe department. Or, if you want to keep it simple, hire at least one veteran from whichever branch as part of the wardrobe team.

Just because it's technically apart of a military uniform, don't assume people actually wear it...

(Columbia Pictures)

5. Retell the big scenes with smaller moments

It's called a "set piece." It's the huge, elaborate moment that costs a boat-load of cash to capture. It's what fits perfectly in the trailers. These are the scenes that action sensations, like The Fast and the Furious films, are known for. And yet, they often leave us feeling like something's missing when done in military films — the personal touch

And that's what really makes military movies different — sure, there are explosions in war, but it's an intensely personal moment for the troops fighting. The gigantic scenes will sell much better if they focus on the fear in someone's eyes more than flying a telephoto lens over the battlefield.

I know I keep coming back to it, but look at the D-Day scene in 'Saving Private Ryan.' The largest amphibious landing and one of the biggest moments in military history — told entirely through the sole perspective of Captain Miller.

​(Dreamworks Pictures)