Entertainment

'Ready Player One' has the most epic climactic battle scene

A huge battle featuring the Battletoads, Ninja Turtles, Ultraman, Mechagodzilla, a team of Spartans from Halo, and about a thousand other beloved pop-culture and childhood icons is something we sadly had to leave behind once all our action figures were cleaned up and mom called us down to dinner.


Kinda like that — but not at all.

Well, not anymore.

Hundreds of pop culture references from the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and recent years are featured heavily in Steven Speilberg's new film, Ready Player One. It's a film the director says was three years in the making and required the coordination of hundreds of artists and creatives the world over — including author Ernest Cline. Cline's 2011 sci-fi novel of the same name was also filled with these great easter eggs.

The film is about the quest for such an "easter egg," which, for the unfamiliar, is an inside joke, hidden message, or secret feature created by the designer of a work. Watching or reading Ready Player One is a lot like trying to get to the center of the world's largest Matryoshka nesting doll of easter eggs.

On Easter.

Set in a poor area of Columbus, Ohio in the year 2045, film centers around Wade Watts, a young gamer inside the Oasis, an open, massively multiplayer, online world – essentially, it's a video game that has supplanted the real world in popularity. The Oasis is populated primarily by other gamers and almost everyone has a customized avatar. Wade's avatar is called "Parzival" and, in the Oasis, he's on the quest for the greatest easter egg in history.

The Oasis' late creator, James Halliday, left a series of clues to help people find hidden keys. Once all three keys are collected, the winner can claim the easter egg – Halliday's fortune and ownership of the Oasis. Watts, in his quest, stumbles upon another gunter (or "egg hunter"), Samantha (also known as Art3mis) and three gamers he knows only through the Oasis: Aech (pronounced "H"), a samurai called Daito, and a ninja called Sho.

An earlier concept of the Battle of Castle Anorak.

Together, as they unlock the secrets to finding the keys, they have to contend with billionaire businessman Nolan Sorrento, CEO of Innovative Online Industries. IOI's corporate villain has seemingly unlimited resources, unlimited lives, and a vast army of digital slaves helping him wrest ownership of and monetize the Oasis, an idea anathema to the god-like Halliday's vision.

By the time we get to the Battle of Castle Anorak (Anorak being the name of the late Halliday's avatar), Parzival has rallied the entire Oasis – the entire world – to fight to keep their digital world pure. Rolling in the DeLorean time machine from Back to the Future, wielding crowd-pleasing weaponry, like Monty Python's holy hand grenade, and fighting alongside horror movie legend, Chucky, Parzival and friends take on IOI's respawning army of employees.

I know, it seems like a lot — even if you've already read the book. But look: If you're a fan of the pop culture of the 1980s, this is the movie for you (listen up, Gen-Xers). The film loves the 1980s as much as you do. More than that, Ready Player One is a throwback to the popcorn-peddling, fun, thrill-ride of movies from the 80s.

IOI's army of faceless game drones. (Amblin Entertainment)

Even if you don't love video games or cheeky 80s references, there's still something for everyone to love in Ready Player One. This is a movie for your inner pop-culture fan.

 Just make sure you've seen The Shining before you go.

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