This is how the Iranian hostage crisis changed American history

The basic story goes like this.

On November 4, 1979, Iranian radicals stormed the American embassy in Tehran, taking 52 Americans hostage. The hostages were held for 444 days, and not released until minutes after Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as president.

However, as always, there is more to the story.

The storming of the embassy came about eight months after the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeni seized power in Iran after the outser of the country’s leader, Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. But the Shah had taken power after a coup d’etat by royalist officers backed by the United States and Great Britain deposed prime minister Mohammad Mosaddegh in 1953, resolving an ongoing power struggle between the two.

The American Embassy in Iran being overrun in 1979 (Iranian Interior ministry photo)

While the Shah’s rule saw the Iranian economy improve significantly, he soon backed a secret police known as SAVAK. The growing repression, though, helped make the Shah more and more unpopular. By January 1979 he and his family left on a “vacation” and never returned.

After the Americans were taken hostage, Khomeni gave his approval to the capture of the U.S. embassy in Tehran. Following that, the U.S. attempted a hostage rescue mission that failed. The crisis crippled then-President Jimmy Carter, who eventually lost to Ronald Reagan in a landslide.

Eagle_Claw_wrecks_at_Desert_One_April_1980

The burned out C-130 from the failed Operation Eagle Claw sits in the Iranian Desert. At far right is the destroyed helicopter. Photo: US Special Operations Command

Reagan’s administration would proceed to launch a major peace-time military buildup, and the eventual end of the Cold War.

This History Channel video discusses the hostage crisis and its impact on U.S. policy in the decade that saw the end of the Soviet Union.


YouTube, History

TOP ARTICLES
Enlisted pilots could fly in combat for the first time since WWII

A number of reasons for pilot shortage include quality-of-life issues, recruitment by private airlines, and the strain of three decades of combat.

Everything you need to know about the Merchant Marine

The United States Merchant Marine is not a military service, but without it, the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps couldn't go anywhere.

That time 'Fighting Dick' fought 'Fightin' Dick' at Antietam

Rarely will a moniker be used for two military leader at the same time. Even more rare is if the two meet on opposite ends of the battlefield.

6 ways you can tell a troop isn't an infantryman

Enter any base you may wonder which one of the troops fight in combat vs. those who ship off to support the war effort Well; we've got you covered. 

British Paratroopers and Gurkhas got into a huge battle royale in Kenya

A force-on-force exercise is under investigation for "descending into chaos" as some of the UK's best troops fought each other with fists and clubs.

This insane anti-aircraft gun chased the Israelis out of the sky

With four radar-guided 23mm cannon, the ZSU-23-4 Shilka could hit an aircraft almost two miles away hard with up to 1,000 rounds a minute.

7 military nicknames that are definitely not compliments

If you've got a nickname, you're either high enough rank to have earned one, you're a pilot, or you did something dumb enough to earn one of these.

8 Things your civilian resume needs to have right now

Checklists make life easier. This checklist will help you avoid some common pitfalls veterans make when trying to land that first job when they get out.

Why so many in the military are getting STDs

Cases of sexually transmitted diseases areon the rise across the U.S., but it's three to six times more common among troops. Let's talk about why.

This is why Yemen is a constant war zone

The situation in Yemen is more dire than previously understood, with a child dying every 10 minutes from hunger after Saudi Arabia enforced a blockade.