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4 Army regulations every soldier pushes to the limits

Let's be real: If Army regulations specifically required just one thing, there'd be someone out there trying to push it to the limit, just to see how far they can go. Then, the commander would make a company-wide memorandum because that Joe took it too far.


Thankfully, there are a number of Army regulations out there for all you rebellious types to break. Let's take a look at those most tested:

4. Wear and Appearance (AR 670-1)

The most cited Army Regulation is also the most abused. Just everything about AR 670-1 is tested, and not just by the lower enlisted.

If the regulations say an officer can wear a cape, you know there's at least one officer who's tried to get away with wearing it. Haircuts are strictly limited, but nearly every E-4 walks around with the exact text memorized, so they can say, "Ah! But the regulation just says, 'unkempt!'"

If your hair is out of regs, find the barracks barber. There's one in every unit. (Photo by Sgt. Ferdinand Thomas II, PAO)

3. Alcohol Limit (AR 600-85)

By pure letter of the word, you cannot wear your uniform in a bar. You cannot wear a uniform in an establishment where your activities are centered around drinking. Being intoxicated in uniform is definitely against Army regs. This mostly gets interpreted as a "two-drink limit" by commanders to close that loophole.

And that's exactly what happens. If, at an event where alcohol happens to be served — like spending a lunch break at the Buffalo Wild Wings just off-post, soldiers will likely grab just two. Doesn't matter the size of the glass, the alcohol content of the drink, the tolerance of the person drinking, or how soon that person should be back on duty. The drink limit is just "two" drinks, right?

Unless you're at an Army Ball, then "commander's discretion" turns into "when they pass out." (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Matthew Kuzara)

2. Counseling Timelines (AR 623-3)

According to regulations, soldiers, NCOs, and officers should be "routinely" counseled, which really means every 30 days. So, by that logic, everyone waits until the last minute to get counseling forms, NCOERs, and OERs done.

Leaders (should) know the soldier underneath them and have a good idea of what they've done throughout the rating period — it's too bad that none of that knowledge gets used as everyone scrambles to get reviews done so people can go home.

Counseling time is probably the worst time to learn you have soldiers. Not speaking from personal experience or anything... (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ian Thompson)

1. Swearing (AR 600-20)

Profanity that is derogatory in nature against someone's race, ethnicity, religion, sex, or orientation is clearly in the wrong. And f*ck you if you're using it specifically against another soldier.

Shy of that, what constitutes "professionalism" and "becoming of a soldier" is a grey area. Commanders don't really have a set guideline of specific expletives you can and cannot say, nor do they dictate how often you can cuss.

Just learn from your drill sergeant. A strong knife hand is a louder "f*ck you" than any voice can yell. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Ken Scar)

*Bonus* Fraternization (still AR 600-20)

AR 600-20 is the Army Command Policy; it mostly serves as a catch-all for the smaller regulations. In the ambiguity of the fraternization policy, the rules behind dating, marriage, and hook-ups are kind of spelled out.

Even friendships between a soldiers and their leaders fall into that same gray area. As long as it doesn't affect morale of all troops, it seems to be fine.