These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control - We Are The Mighty
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These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Who needs video games like Doom or Half Life when you’ve got a production company in England that’ll give you a real live-action first person shooter instead.


British film company Realm Pictures recently shot a live shooter game, with the actions controlled entirely by unsuspecting users of internet video sites such as ChatRoulette, Omegle, and Skype. The results were amazing.

“Many years ago we experimented with the concept of ‘random stranger’ control – and one afternoon strapped a webcam to my head while someone followed me around with a laptop,” David Reynolds, a director at the company, told Tech News Today. “The idea stuck in my head – and eventually resurfaced while we were talking about fun projects for the summer. We decided to throw some of our indie film tricks behind it and see what happened.”

Watch the video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p747PrxmZJ4feature=youtu.be

In case you were wondering how they pulled it off, you can see the behind-the-scenes here:

NOW: The ‘mythical head shot’ and why it’s so lethal 

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This sniper is credited with over 500 kills

Simo Häyhä, also known as “The White Death,” was a Finnish sniper who is credited with killing more than 500 enemy troops within 100 days during the Winter War against the Soviet Union between 1939 and 1940.


Häyhä accomplished this incredible feat with a Russian-made Mosin-Nagant M91 rifle and iron sights. He preferred the iron sights as opposed to the scope because it allowed him to shoot from a lower, less visible position. The sights also didn’t fog up in the cold or glare in the sun, which could give away his position, according to Special Forces Sniper Skills by Robert Stirling.

His career ended when he was shot in the face, blowing off part of his cheek and lower jaw. He survived the shot, becoming one of Finland’s most legendary heroes. He died in 2002 of natural causes.

This six-minute video tells his incredible story.

Watch: 

NOW: The top 10 deadliest snipers of all time

OR: Allied WWII snipers in 13 extraordinary photographs

Articles

This man in Georgia restores WWII airplane turrets in his garage

Plane turrets got their combat debut in World War II but were nearly obsolete by the time the war ended as jet planes could fly too fast for most gunners to hit them.


Most turrets were scrapped after the war, but one enthusiast in Georgia is collecting those that survived and restoring them to working conditions.

In his workshop in Georgia, Fred Bieser has thousands of turret parts and, as of 2013 when this video was shot, had restored seven turrets. Most of them are kept in his workshop, but some have gone on display at military museums.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
American ball turret gunner Alan Magee poses in his station. (Photo: U.S. Army Air Force)

In this video from Tested, Bieser takes a video crew through his workshop and shows the guts of turrets and how they worked.

The video includes a lot of cool history on turrets, like how pilots worked with gunners to ensure accuracy and how Britain and America used different technologies for power and control.

Check out the full video below:

Articles

This rifle makes posting your kills to Facebook easier

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Image: TrackingPoint


TrackingPoint’s rifle technology is known for making the marksman equation easier. However, one of their little-known features is the onboard streaming technology.

Related: This rifle can turn anyone into an American Sniper

With wearable technology, such as Google Glass or Recon Jet, shooters can stand behind a corner and still aim at a target. Not only does the sight stream from the rifle to wearable device, it also streams to mobile phones, tablets, and computers to anyone in the world over the Internet. This makes it easier to share your kills to Facebook rather than tasking your spotter to record video. Just sayin’.

Of course, while TrackingPoint makes real-life shooting seem easier than video game sniping, one should never take skills for granted. After all, it is technology, and technology breaks.

Here’s TrackingPoint’s streaming technology in action:

TrackingPoint, YouTube

Intel

Veterans On Reddit Shared Their Favorite Experiences From The US Military

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Photo: Staff Sgt. Teddy Wade/US Army


People have a range of different reasons for joining the military, and each US veteran has their own unique experiences and memories while in the service.

Redditer user airmonk asked the veterans at the military community on Reddit about their single best experiences while serving. The answers run from the mundane to the comical to the serious, and present a glimpse into life in the military that many outside of the service rarely encounter or even know about.

Below are some of our favorite answers to airmonk’s question: “veterans of reddit, what is the best experience you’ve had while serving?”

Bat_Manatee, a member of the US Army, said that his best experience was taking part in the commemorations of the D-Day invasion’s 70th anniversary over the summer in 2014: “Jumped into Normandy for the 70th anniversary of D-Day. The entire Normandy experience was awesome, capped off by the jump.”

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Photo: The National Guard/Flickr

User docskreba, a member of the Air Force, was also at the commemorations and echoed Bat_Manatee’s sentiment:

“I was part of the crew running the flight line at Cherbourg for that jump (and everything else going on that week). I have a video of the elephant walk somewhere…”

I do have this videoof a C-130 flyby at Pointe du Hoc.

Very cool experience indeed.

Other veterans said that their favorite experiences while serving were the moments of silence and contemplation.

Stinkfingers, a member of the US Coast Guard, shared this experience: “Being at sea looking at the stars. All you can hear is the gentle rumble of the diesel engines and the water sloshing. Very relaxing after a long day.”

Likewise, Spritzertog, a member of the Marines, held a similar affinity for staring skyward: “Sitting on the hood of my car with a female Marine friend of mine, in the middle of the desert just outside of 29 Palms [a Marine base in California] … staring up at the star-filled night sky with absolutely no lights anywhere nearby.”

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony R. Martinez/US Navy

Potato_Muncher, an Army veteran, enjoyed the hard living and action that came with serving in Iraq:

68W AIT [healthcare specialist advanced individual training]. Enough trim and alcohol to kill a small elephant.

Besides that? Probably the outpost outside of Bartella, Iraq near Mosul. I loved that little 75 x 75yd plot of land. No one to tell you what to do, leadership that was as exhausted as you, my own room (Medic perks), daily foot patrols, etc. It was like an awesome FTX [field training exercise] away from Big Army.

Pntfrk also had his best experience in the military while in the field:

Blew up a house on the 4th of July. I was EOD [explosive ordnance disposal] and we were called out to clear/dispose of a cache found in a house. The IA major in charge of the area wanted us to take down the house since they kept finding caches there. We happily obliged.

But for thepancakedrawer, serving in the military was worth it just for the nuggets: “Free chicken nuggets on Mondays at Chick-Fil-A.”

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Photo: yoppy/Flickr

More from Business Insider:

This article originally appeared at Business Insider Defense Copyright 2015. Follow BI Defense on Twitter.

Also Watch: The Military Categories The Oscars Forgot

Intel

What doesn’t actually constitute an OPSEC violation

We live in a world more connected than ever before. Within many of our pockets is a device that can instantly share words, voice, photos, and videos with anyone else connected to the internet. That unprecedented ease of access to information has led many to accidentally share restricted, sensitive information. This is a breach of what’s known within in the military as “operations security” (OPSEC). We all know that loose lips sink ships, but despite that, it seems like lectures have been given on a near-weekly basis in the military to keep information from leaking.


As long as thought is put into what’s posted, no sensitive information is released, and what is posted won’t be used as key puzzle piece for the enemy, no one gives a sh*t.

Here’s what you can share without violating OPSEC. Of course, take all of this with a grain of salt. Take all commands from your superiors and unit’s intelligence analysts. They will always have the final say.

1. Group photos (as long as nothing sensitive is shown)

If you’re deployed to Afghanistan and you want to get a picture to remember the good times, go for it! Post it on Facebook and tag all of your bros so you can reminisce down the road.

Make sure it isn’t taken in a classified location, inside the Ops center, or anywhere else with sensitive information around. Make sure that nothing is shown that hasn’t yet been made public knowledge.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
I mean, unless you don’t want the enemy to know where your most convenient smoke pit is… (Photo by OF-2 Kay Nissen)

2. General information about yourself

Chances are high that you’re not doing Maverick-level work, so there’s no need to use the “If I told you, I’d have to kill you” line at the bar. If you’re a regular Joe in the formation, it’s not a secret that you’re just rearranging connexes in between the occasional patrol mission.

For the large majority of Uncle Sam’s warfighters, the only real bit of sensitive information about an individual is a social security number — but letting that slip is more of a personal security risk than a national one.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Being in the military is already badass enough. You don’t need to inflate your ego to impress someone who’s already interested. (Photo by Spc. Ryan DeBooy)

3. General locations (if it’s public knowledge troops are there)

Obviously, you should never post GPS coordinates along with times of your movements. But if someone asks where you are, you can totally reply with, “I don’t know, some sh*thole in the middle of nowhere.” People don’t really need to know, care, or sometimes understand where you’re at.

Plus, we’ve had troops in Afghanistan for almost seventeen years, so they can probably find the country on a globe, and that’s about it.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
This is basically how they all see the Middle East anyway. (Photo by Chief Master-at-Arms Tony Guyette)

4. Mailing address (after a certain time)

If you’re out on deployment and someone back home is worried sick about you, it’s completely fine to say where you’re at after the unit allows you to post it.

Deployed mailing addresses are very distinct. The street code is usually the unit, the city and state is “APO, AE,” and the ZIP code starts with a zero. This format is the same for troops in-country, stationed overseas, and at sea. There isn’t much personal information that can be deciphered from a mailing address that can’t be found in hundreds of other ways. “Private Smith is with this unit and isn’t in America” isn’t a shocking discovery.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
How else are you going to get cookies from your worried mother?

5. Anything already published

“I don’t know how to break this to you guys — and it’s super serious — troops have supplies somewhere in the Middle East!” See how dumb that sounds? Everyone already knows that.

Posting stuff on social media that’s already published doesn’t breach OPSEC. Why would a terrorist go through the effort to find something on your profile they can get from a quick Google search?

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
If the official U.S. Army Facebook page posts something about how it has stuff all around the world in locations that troops are commonly stationed, they probably know what they’re doing. (Image via U.S. Army Facebook)

Intel

Behind the scenes at the 2016 ‘Pin-Ups For Vets’ calendar photo shoot

The 2016 Pin-Ups For Vets Calendar is ready for pre-sale now and ships in late August. This marks the organization’s 10th year of serving the military community. As a special bonus, they’ve included guest appearances by Max Uriarte (creator of Terminal Lance), Mark Valley (TV actor, best known for “Boston Legal”), and more.


Pin-Ups For Vets serves the military community by crisscrossing the country delivering gifts to hospitalized veterans at their bedsides, shipping care packages to troops stationed overseas, and more. Proceeds from the sales are used to carry out various veteran and troop initiatives.

Here’s a behind the scenes video of the 2016 calendar photo shoot:

Visit Pin-Ups For Vets or pre-order your copy of their 2016 calendar.

NOW: 15 modern photos of pin-up girls taken in support of US troops

OR: These ‘Pin-Up’ girls entertain veterans with burlesque shows and sexy calendars

Intel

Here is an inside look at the Armata, Russia’s main battle tank

The Armata is billed as Russia’s deadliest battle tank and is based on a universal combat platform that serves as the chassis for other military vehicles.


The first configuration, the T-14, has a heavily armored hull and a 125-mm cannon.

T-14 Armata T-14 Armata, Wikimedia

The second configuration is an infantry fighting vehicle with a smaller, 30-mm cannon and is called the BMP Armata, or T-15.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
T-15 Armata, Wikimedia

The third configuration has a crane instead of a cannon and is the Armored Repair-Evacuation Vehicle, or T-16. It is used to recover damaged armored vehicles and tanks.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
T-16 Armata (RoyXPsp3, YouTube)

The Armata platform has been under development since 2009 and began trials in Feb. 2015. Large deliveries of the tank will start in 2017 or 2018, according to Interfax. Here is the latest video showing the capabilities of the tank, including shots of its interior.

Watch: 

Intel

Marine Corps veteran holds a plank for 5+ hours to break a world record

Marine veteran George Hood held a record-breaking abdominal plank for more than five hours on Saturday while also raising money for a veterans’ charity, NBC San Diego reports.


The 57-year-old held the plank position for five hours, 15 minutes, and 15 seconds to break the Guinness World Record previously set by Mao Weidong of Beijing, China, in September 2014 at four hours and 26 minutes. Hood, who is also a fitness instructor, dubbed his achievement “The People’s Plank,” which doubled as a fundraiser for the Semper Fi Fund for injured service members, according to CBS News.

“There are injured Marines that come back from the fight, who have suffered life-altering injuries and the discomfort that I feel right now pales in comparison to that which they feel,” Hood told NBC while in mid-plank position. “They’re my heroes, they really are, every one of them.”

Watch Hood’s interview while breaking the world plank record:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xr5FxGGn1o

NOW: Everyone should see these powerful images of wounded vets

OR: 5 problems infantry Marines will understand

Intel

Physicists say both sides are lying about the downed Russian jet

Two Belgian physicists have analyzed both Russia and Turkey’s stories surrounding the Russian Su-24 that was shot down by a Turkish F-16 on Nov. 24. Their conclusion is that both countries are making claims that are physically impossible.


Physicists Tom van Doorsslaere and Giovanni Lapenta checked into Turkey’s claims and concluded that two of them were likely false. They reject the claim that the jet spent 17 seconds in Turkish air space and that the Turkish military issued ten warnings to the Russian jet.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
The red line is what Russia claims is the path of their Su-24 jet, the purple is the Turkish border, and the blue line is the path of the Turkish F-16. Map: Russian Ministry of Defense

The physicists also assert that Russia’s map showing the route of their jet is also bogus because the course change claimed by Russia could not have been caused by the relatively small missile that hit it.

To see the physicists logic and math, check out the full story at Motherboard.

Intel

How battle drills can be explained through a night of drinking

There are many clever ways to remember stuff from the Army’s study guide. “Low Flying Pilots Eat Tacos,” for example, is a great mnemonic for remembering the first 5 lines of your 9-line medevac. “Sergeant Major Eats Sugar Cookies” is a great one for trying to remember your operation orders. But there isn’t really accepted one for remembering the battle drills. So, instead of a goofy mnemonic, think of the 8 battle drills as the 8 stages of drinking at a bar with your buddies.


For the sake of brevity, we’re only covering battle drills at the platoon level. They’re the same in theory, but the designations are different for squad-level drills. And of course, there’s much more to each battle drill, this is just about remembering the basics.

Battle Drill 1: Platoon attack

Or, when you and your boys are headed out.

You guys are finally headed out. From here on out, you move as a single unit, you stay together as a single unit. Group up and head out. After all, fighting and drinking are the two greatest things an infantryman can do!

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Battle Drill 2: React to contact

Or, getting to the bar.

All the sights and sounds are coming at you at once. Bunker down in a spot that can serve you well — you may be there for a while.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Battle Drill 3: Break contact

Or, moving around the bar.

There’s no such thing as retreat. You need to scout out a new spot and get there quick. If your boys see a better spot, follow them to it.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Battle Drill 4: React to ambush

Or, you’re approached by someone you’re interested in, but you’re drunk.

You’re caught in the kill zone. You don’t want to stay in a place where you’re weak. Reposition yourself to give yourself the edge.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Never leave a fallen comrade. Your boy may need a wingman. (Photo by Spc. L’Erin Wynn)

Battle Drill 5: Knock out bunkers

Or, when you’re trying to use the bathroom.

You observe where you want to “go” and wait until your perfect moment to strike — or take a piss.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Battle Drill 6: Enter building/clear room

Or, coming home drunk off your ass.

You need to enter the doorway as soon as you can and get out of the kill zone. Be careful, if you or one of your boys is married, you might run into some “heat” for coming in at this hour.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Battle Drill 7: Enter/clear a trench

Or, trying to curl up into bed.

Keep a low profile. You can adjust, but keep your eyes on the enemy (or the toilet, in case you have to hurl).

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control

Battle Drill 8: Conduct initial breach of a mined obstacle

Or, dealing with a hangover.

The key is to deal with this one slow and steady — no quick movements. Don’t do anything too stupid and let other people (breach team or EOD) handle it.

These guys shot a real-life first person shooter — with random people taking control
Or just avoid doing anything. That works too. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Armando Limon)

Intel

This video is the best Force Recon footage you’ll see this week

U.S. Force Recon Marines move ahead of the rest of the force and plunge into dangerous areas where the Marine ground force commander needs to know what’s going on but can’t otherwise gather intelligence.


They strap on scuba tanks, parachutes, and heavy rucks as the mission requires and carry an arsenal just in case they need to tangle with the enemy while reconnoitering the area. Check out the video above to see what these guys are all about.