7 animals with better camouflage than you

Shortly after the First World War kicked off, war-fighters began adopting camouflage patterns to conceal themselves during battle. Over the years, it’s gotten more and more advanced until they changed over to the digital pattern because rumor says its “better.”

It’s probably just cheaper to produce.

Show me the science. That’s all I’m saying.

No matter how good the military thinks they can make theirs, animals have beaten us to it through millennia of evolution to perfectly hide from predator and prey alike.

Here are 7 who are better at camouflage than the military (thought #1 is a close call):

7. A golden retriever is like the Navy’s ‘blueberry’ pattern

Let’s face it. Pretty much any form of camouflage pattern that is remotely the same shade as its surroundings is better than dark blue digi-cam on a light gray ship.

If it wasn’t for the fact that it technically considered a camo pattern, it would be compared to a loud, goofy puppy.

This is the animal that most closely resembles the effectiveness of this branch’s camouflage style.

Golden retriever navy

Still have much love for you guys! Even if your camo pattern only works the one place a sailor wants to be spotted easily — overboard.

6. An actual tiger compared to Air Force ‘Tiger Stripes’

Somewhere down the line, an Airman thought, “Let’s take the Army’s Vietnam-era SOF pattern but add more tiger stripes. Because we’re fierce.” And no one had the courage to stop them.

The tiger uses its stripes to blend in with tall grass. Senior Airmen use their stripes to fail at making Below the Zone.

Tiger Airmen

See Navy? You’re not the only ones on the bottom of this list

5. This cat compared to a soldier’s ACUs

The only place the Army Combat Uniform works is on Grandma’s old couch. But it does fairly well when it gets dirty, so there’s that.

I mean, house cats would still need some kind of camouflage. Animal Planet did rank them as “The Most Extreme” killer because they kill for sport instead of food or territory. Savage!

Cat and soldier camo

“Seen in his natural habitat, the specialist waits until the sergeant has left the area.”

4. A barn owl compared to a Marine’s MARPAT

Rounding out the regular service uniforms are the Marines — because they actually tried to fit into their surroundings.

owl vs marine

But they may have only won this by default.

3. An alligator compared to a sniper’s ghillie suit

On to actually useful camouflages, both the alligator and sniper begin the real contest.

They both adapt to their environment by adding local flora to help conceal themselves.

Alligator vs sniper

Both deadly, but both have to stay still for a long period of time to get their kill.

2. A peppered moth compared to a Force Recon’s suit

Both get shared around for those “can you spot the -whatever-” photos on social media. Both cause the people trying to find them to give up and look in the comments.

Another key to excellent camouflage is keeping a low profile. Fewer shadows would help this guys’ head conceal a bit more.

moth vs recon

No need for a fancy suit if you know your perfect spot.

1. A spider compared to a sniper

The one things snipers will tell you if you want to join them is that you have to get comfortable with waiting around. And it’s not the standard issued “hurry up and wait” — they mean “hours without a single twitch” kind of waiting.

Don’t be afraid to dig in. You may have to hold that spot for a while.

Spider vs sniper

Believe me, they’re both in this photo and they’re both dead center in of each of their frames.