6 shooter video games that require military strategy - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY GAMING

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

Video games are a much-enjoyed pastime for younger generations. It just so happens that a lot of troops today come from this video-game-loving generation. While they’re not out physically training for their upcoming deployment, they’re probably back in their barracks room “training.”


No, it’s not because they’re working to be 110% prepared. It’s because these games are also pretty fun.

6. America’s Army: Proving Ground

To be absolutely fair to every other game, this one was made by the U.S. Army. It serves as both a fun training aid for troops and an enjoyable recruitment tool for civilians.

While going through the training missions, a helpful Drill Sergeant will give you sound advice, for both the gaming world and the real thing.

 

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

5. SOCOM U.S. Navy SEALs

SOCOM is an oldie, but it still holds up — and has a huge place in gaming history. It laid the groundwork for many of the games on this list.

Sure, the graphics don’t hold up and you can find a more accurate video game on the shelves today, but this game brought a new dynamic to the industry. It was the first game to make use of the PlayStation’s microphone in a shooter and one of the first overall to use it successfully.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
The graphics definitely don’t hold up. (SOCOM U.S. Navy SEALs, Sony Entertainment)

4. Rainbow Six: Siege

Siege is fast-paced game that pits a team of six attackers against six defenders. Players must then chose an operator based on many real-world Counterterrorist units, each with a special trait based off of real technology.

Communication and breaching are key elements to making Rainbow Six: Siege work. If you know the enemy is guarding the door, blow out the walls. If you know the enemy barricaded the walls, blow out the roof. If you know they booby-trapped that entrance, flash bang your way through to the objective.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
…And hope Lord Tachanka isn’t set on the objective. (Rainbow Six: Siege, Ubisoft)

3. Sniper Elite 4

If there’s one defining trait of real-life snipers, it’s their ability to wait for hours on end to get the perfect shot. While the waiting part isn’t the most alluring element of Sniper Elite, it definitely makes delivering that single, precise bullet all the more satisfying.

This game needs to be played slowly, methodically, and relaxed. And then you can sit back and enjoy as the game gives you a satisfying x-ray of the damage you’ve inflicted on the enemy.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
It’s just so, so satisfying. (Sniper Elite 4, Rebellion Developments)

2. Battlefield 1

The entire Battlefield series is beloved by troops for its slower pace (compared to the running and gunning of Call of Duty). The games also take a more logical approach to capturing objectives.

Players need to think through large 64-player vs 64-player battlefields. You can’t just run into a room, spin 360 degrees, and headshot someone with a sniper rifle without looking through the scope.

…unless you’re good.

1. Arma 3

There’s no game on the marketplace quite like Arma 3. Yes, there are single-player missions that require a basic level of thought, but what sets this game at the top is the deep multiplayer element.

Teamwork and coordination are keys to victory in this game. Everyone needs a microphone to communicate properly. You clear houses, just like real life. You man checkpoints, just like real life. And you even have support troops, just like real life. This game’s community is so well-versed in tactics to the point that actual service-members who play are often praised and asked to lead the civilians on missions.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
Squad up! (Arma 3, Bohemia Interactive)

*Bonus* Six Days in Fallujah

This game is left with just an honorable mention because it was never released. Originally created by Atomic Games, Six Days in Fallujah would have been the first of it’s kind. The developers wanted to deliver an experience that would require the player to use an extreme amount of military tactics in every level and accurately depict the Second Battle of Fallujah in what would have been almost an interactive documentary. It aimed to put the player in the psychological mindset of Marines that were actually there.

The game was said to have depicted the good, the bad, and the unfortunate sides of the very real war. You would have followed the actual 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines who took part in the battle. The objectives and conditions were exactly like those of real-life. The real Marines who died in the battle would have died in the game, too. It was scrapped in 2009 because of a severe backlash against the publisher for “trivializing” the severity of the Iraq War.

MIGHTY GAMING

The biggest awards show in gaming just revealed this year’s nominees

The Game Awards 2019 has announced this years list of nominees, which includes 107 different games spread across more than 20 categories.

Established in 2014, The Game Awards is an annual ceremony featuring live performances, celebrity presenters, major industry announcements, and world premiere trailers. More than 26 million people streamed the awards last year.

This year’s nominees are led by games like “Death Stranding,” “Fortnite,” “Control,” “Apex Legends,” and “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate,” all of which received three or more nominations. The Game Awards also includes special categories for unique genres, independent releases, virtual reality, and esports.


The Game Awards advisory board includes executives from more than a dozen major gaming companies, including Xbox, Nintendo, Sony Interactive Entertainment, Valve, and Tencent.

Fans can help choose the winners in every category on the event’s website or by searching “TGA vote” on Google. You can vote for a winner in each category once per day through December 11 — your vote will be authenticated with an existing social media or Google account. (Chinese viewers can use Bilibili to vote.)

The Game Awards ceremony will be held on December 12 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles at 5:30 p.m. PT. The awards will be streamed live on more than 60 different international platforms — including YouTube, Twitch, Twitter, Facebook, and Mixer — but tickets to attend the event in person are also on sale now.

Cinemark Theatres across the United States will host a special event in 53 of its theaters where it’ll pair a live simulcast of the awards with the world premiere screenings of “Jumanji: The Next Level.”

Here’s the full list of The Game Awards 2019 nominees:

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Death Stranding”

(Kojima Productions)

Game of the Year

  • “Control” (Remedy/505 Games)
  • “Death Stranding” (Kojima Productions/Sony Interactive Entertainment)
  • “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate” (Bandai-Namco/Sora/Nintendo)
  • “Resident Evil 2” (Capcom/Capcom)
  • “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice “(From Software/Activision)
  • “The Outer Worlds” (Obsidian/Private Division)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Resident Evil 2”

(Capcom)

Best Game Direction

  • “Control” (Remedy/505 Games)
  • “Death Stranding” (Kojima Productions/SIE)
  • “Resident Evil 2” (Capcom/Capcom)
  • “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice” (From Software/Activision)
  • “Outer Wilds” (Mobius Digital/Annapurna)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Control”

(505 Games)

Best Narrative

  • “A Plague Tale: Innocence” (Asobo/Focus Home)
  • “Control” (Remedy/505)
  • “Death Stranding “(Kojima Productions/SIE)
  • “Disco Elysium” (ZA/UM)
  • “The Outer Worlds” (Obsidian/Private Division)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Cadence of Hyrule”

(Nintendo)

Best Score/Music

  • “Cadence of Hyrule” (Brace Yourself Games/Nintendo)
  • “Death Stranding” (Kojima Productions/SIE)
  • “Devil May Cry 5” (Capcom)
  • “Kingdom Hearts III” (Square Enix)
  • “Sayonara Wild Hearts” (Simogo/Annapurna)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Call of Duty: Modern Warfare”

(Activision)

Best Audio Design

  • “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare” (Infinity Ward/Activision)
  • “Control” (Remedy/505)
  • “Death Stranding” (Kojima Productions/SIE)
  • “Gears 5” (The Coalition/Xbox Game Studios)
  • “Resident Evil 2” (Capcom)
  • “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice” (From Software/Activision)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Gears 5”

(Xbox Game Studios)

Best Performance

  • Ashly Burch as Parvati Holcomb, “The Outer Worlds”
  • Courtney Hope as Jesse Faden, “Control”
  • Laura Bailey as Kait Diaz, “Gears 5”
  • Mads Mikkelsen as Cliff, “Death Stranding”
  • Matthew Porretta as Dr. Casper Darling, “Control”
  • Norman Reedus as Sam Porter Bridges, “Death Stranding”
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Concrete Genie”

Games for Impact

  • “Concrete Genie” (Pixelopus/SIE)
  • “Gris” (Nomada Studio/Devolver)
  • “Kind Words” (Popcannibal)
  • “Life is Strange 2” (Dontnod/Square Enix)
  • “Sea of Solitude” (Jo-Mei Games/EA)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

(Apex Legends)

Best Ongoing Game

  • “Apex Legends” (Respawn)
  • “Destiny 2” (Bungie)
  • “Final Fantasy XIV” (Square Enix)
  • “Fortnite” (Epic Games)
  • “Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege” (Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Outer Wilds”

(Annapurna Interactive)

Best Independent Game

  • “Baba Is You” (Hempuli)
  • “Disco Elysium” (ZA/UM)
  • “Katana ZERO” (Askiisoft/Devoler)
  • “Outer Wilds” (Mobius Digital/Annapurna)
  • “Untitled Goose Game” (House House/Panic)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Sayonara Wild Hearts”

(Annapurna)

Best Mobile Game

  • “Call of Duty: Mobile” (TiMi Studios/Activision)
  • “GRINDSTONE” (Capybara Games)
  • “Sayonara Wild Hearts” (Simogo/Annapurna)
  • “Sky: Children of Light” (Thatgamecompany)
  • “What the Golf?” (Tribland)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Fortnite”

(Epic Games)

Best Community Support

  • “Apex Legends” (Respawn/EA)
  • “Destiny 2” (Bungie)
  • “Final Fantasy XIV” (Square Enix)
  • “Fortnite “(Epic Games)
  • “Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege” (Ubisoft Montreal/Ubisoft)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

(Squanch Games)

Best VR/AR Game

  • “Asgard’s Wrath” (Sanzaru Games/Oculus Studios)
  • “Blood Truth” (SIE London Studio/SIE)
  • “Beat Saber” (Beat Games)
  • “No Man’s Sky” (Hello Games)
  • “Trover Saves the Universe” (Squanch Games)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Devil May Cry 5”

(Capcom)

Best Action Game

  • “Apex Legends” (Respawn/EA)
  • “Astral Chain” (Platinum Games/Nintendo)
  • “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare” (Infinity Ward/Activision)
  • “Devil May Cry 5” (Capcom/Capcom)
  • “Gears 5” (The Coalition/Xbox Game Studios)
  • “Metro Exodus” (4A Games/Deep Silver)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Borderlands 3”

(Gearbox Software)

Best Action/Adventure Game

  • “Borderlands 3” (Gearbox/2K)
  • “Control” (Remedy/505 Games)
  • “Death Stranding” (Kojima Productions/SIE)
  • “Resident Evil 2” (Capcom)
  • “The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening” (Grezzo/Nintendo)
  • “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice” (From Software/Activision)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

(Disney/Square Enix)

Best Roleplaying Game

  • “Disco Elysium” (ZA/UM)
  • “Final Fantasy XIV” (Square Enix)
  • “Kingdom Hearts III” (Square Enix)
  • “Monster Hunter World: Iceborne” (Capcom)
  • “The Outer Worlds” (Obsidian/Private Division)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Mortal Kombat 11”

(NetherRealm Studios)

Best Fighting Game

  • “Dead or Alive 6” (Team Ninja/Koei Tecmo)
  • “Jump Force” (Spike Chunsoft/Bandai Namco)
  • “Mortal Kombat 11” (NetherRealm/WBIE)
  • “Samurai Showdown” (SNK/Athlon)
  • “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate” (Bandai Namco/Sora/Nintendo)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Super Smash Bros. Ultimate”

(Nintendo)

Best Family Game

  • “Luigi’s Mansion 3” (Next Level Games/Nintendo)
  • “Ring Fit Adventure” (Nintendo EPD/Nintendo)
  • “Super Mario Maker 2” (Nintendo EPD/Nintendo)
  • “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate” (Bandai Namco/Sora/Nintendo)
  • “Yoshi’s Crafted World” (Good-Feel/Nintendo)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Fire Emblem: Three Houses”

(Nintendo)

Best Strategy Game

  • “Age of Wonders: Planetfall” (Triumph Studios/Paradox)
  • “Anno 1800” (Blue Byte/Ubisoft)
  • “Fire Emblem: Three Houses” (Intelligent Systems/Koei Tecmo/Nintendo)
  • “Total War: Three Kingdoms” (Creative Assembly/Sega)
  • “Tropico 6” (Limbic Entertainment/Kalypso Media)
  • “Wargroove” (Chucklefish)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled”

(Activision)

Best Sports/Racing Game

  • Crash Team Racing Nitro-Fueled” (Beenox/Activision)
  • “DiRT Rally 2.0” (Codemasters)
  • “eFootball Pro Evolution Soccer 2020” (PES Productions/Konami)
  • “F1 2019” (Codemasters)
  • “FIFA 20” (EA Sports)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Tom Clancy’s The Division 2”

(Ubisoft)

Best Multiplayer Game

  • “Apex Legends” (Respawn/EA)
  • “Borderlands 3” (Gearbox/2K)
  • “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare” (Infinity Ward/Activision)
  • “Tetris 99” (Arika/Nintendo)
  • “Tom Clancy’s The Division 2” (Massive Entertainment/Ubisoft)
6 shooter video games that require military strategy

(Blizzard Entertainment)

Best Esports Game

  • “Counter-Strike: Global Offensive” (Valve)
  • “DOTA2” (Valve)
  • “Fortnite” (Epic Games)
  • “League of Legends” (Riot Games)
  • “Overwatch” (Blizzard)

Best Esports Player

  • Kyle “Bugha” Giersdorf (Immortals, Fortnite)
  • Lee “Faker” Sang-hyeok (SK Telecom, League of Legends)
  • Luka “Perkz” Perkovic

Content Creator of the Year

  • Courage — Jack Dunlop
  • Dr. Lupo — Benjamin Lupo
  • Ewok — Soleil Wheeler
  • Grefg — David Martínez
  • Shroud — Michael Grzesiek

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY GAMING

How veterans and their families can get free video games

Most veterans who have served in the past 20 years are probably familiar with video games. From barracks LAN parties, to marathon sessions of Madden NFL at the MWR while downrange, it’s safe to say veterans like to play video games. Studies have shown that video games also help veterans recover from some mental health challenges, providing an escape while boosting confidence, personal growth, leadership, and social connections.

Operation Supply Drop’s Games to Grunts program supports community engagement to veterans, military, and their families through video games. Most of the games they offer are on Steam, such as TEKKEN 7, Cooking Simulator, and Vietnam 65′, but other platforms are also available, like free XBOX Game Passes. All of the games are available through digital download codes.


MIGHTY GAMING

Head of Air Force’s Air Combat Command dogfights his son on Twitch

The commander of Air Combat Command and his son fought each other live on a Twitch stream in a combat flight action video game on June 29, 2019.

Gen. Mike Holmes pitted his skill with the F-15 against 1st Lt. Wade Holmes and his F-16 in this exhibition match designed to highlight the Air Force’s pilot community and to answer questions from viewers about military service.

While there was a fair share of air-to-air kills and crashes into the ground for both men, the younger Holmes was the clear winner of the video game version of life in the cockpit.


“This type of alternative interview format is a really great way to engage with our audience,” said Michelle Clougher, chief of the ACC Public Affairs command information division. “We’re always looking for a different way to tell the Air Force story, and these two rock-star pilots have a lot they can share.

“Ten years ago, we never would have thought to have our top fighter pilot play a video game while broadcasting it live to the whole world,” she continued. “But as our technologies evolve, so do we. We must communicate in a way that is meaningful and connects with people.”

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

US Air Force Gen. Mike Holmes and 1st Lt. Wade Holmes, his son, play a combat flight action video game, at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, June 29, 2019.

(US Air Force photo by Emerald Ralston)

Twitch is a live-streaming video service platform introduced in 2011. The service has grown to share video content with more than 15 million daily active users.

During the stream, the Holmeses discussed the Air Force’s current pilot shortage, and explained the importance of air battle managers and the communications from the E-3 AWACS. They also expressed their gratitude for all the service’s crew chiefs and answered various questions about their aircraft, while sharing stories from their careers.

The pilots gave advice for joining the Air Force and compared real flight versus this arcade simulation. And while the general has more than 4,000 hours in a real aircraft — many of those are combat hours — the lieutenant had the edge with this matchup.

One Twitch user even asked the lieutenant to take it easy on his “old man” toward the end of one match.

“I appreciate that,” General Holmes said with a laugh. “I’m going to feign an injury here in a moment.”

“Air Combat Command does not teach me to take pity on my adversary,” replied Lieutenant Holmes as he secured the win.

The stream lasted for approximately one hour, and it can be viewed below:

“Thanks for tuning in,” General Holmes said to wrap up the event. “We enjoyed having a chance to talk to you for a little bit. As the Air Force, we’re trying to reach out to people that could find a home in the Air Force. We hope you’ll consider finding a way to serve your country in some way.”

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY GAMING

A Navy veteran just got a special Xbox delivered via skydiver

To celebrate the release of Battlefield V, Microsoft and Electronic Arts partnered to give a Florida veteran a limited-edition Xbox One X bundle, delivered via an outrageous skydiving stunt.

Motorsport driver and stunt performer Travis Pastrana of Nitro Circus dove from a height of 13,000 feet to deliver the first Xbox One X Gold Rush Special Edition Battlefield V bundle to retired Navy Corpsman Jeff Bartrom, who lives in Paisley, Florida. Pastrana hit a peak speed of 140 mph during the dive, and the jump took less than 55 seconds.


Travis Pastrana Aerial Drop With Xbox One Gold Rush Battlefield Bundle

www.youtube.com

The giveaway was meant to thank Bartrom for his service, and it coincides with Microsoft’s #GiveWithXbox initiative. The company pledged to donate worth of Xbox products for every picture shared to social media with the hashtag showing the importance of gaming. Microsoft will donate up to id=”listicle-2621537520″ million to be split between four charities, Child’s Play, Gamers Outreach, SpecialEffect, and Operation Supply Drop. The social-media campaign is running through December 9th.

World War II shooter Battlefield V officially launched on Nov. 20, 2018, and is available on Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC. The Xbox One X version of Battlefield V also features enhanced visuals. EA Access members can play a free 10-hour trial of the game on their platform of choice as well.

Get the latest Microsoft stock price here.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY GAMING

9 disappointing ways Call of Duty isn’t like the military

Ah, Call of Duty. A video game that was a far more successful recruitment tool for the Army than the Army’s actual recruitment video game America’s Army.

It’s understandable that the game would plant a good seed in the heads of many teens who play the game. They get a consequence-free taste of the badassery from the safety of their couch. Later they’ll keep the military in the back of their mind and one day they’ll enlist.

If it fills the seats of recruitment offices — it’s fantastic. The only down side is that it kind of paints the military in an unrealistically awesome light. That’s not to say that life isn’t awesome in the military — just not that awesome.


6 shooter video games that require military strategy

You’ll think it’s a cool achievement when you finish but everyone else has it unlocked already.

(Photo by Scott Prater)

The tutorial is over nine weeks long

In the video game, you can just skip any training if you’ve already got an idea of how things work. You don’t get that kind of luxury in the real military. Even if you have a good idea how to pick up food with a fork or make a bed, you’ll learn you’ve been doing it wrong your entire life.

Then comes the cool training like rifle marksmanship. You’ll blink and then it’s back to learning that eating and showering should be done in 30 seconds.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

You’re kinda on your own getting “Slight of Hand Pro.”

(DoD photo by Sgt. Tierney P. Nowland)

You can’t really modify your loadout

You can earn cool points in Call of Duty with the people you’re playing with by unlocking all the attachments and skins for your weapons. Hate to burst your bubble but it’s generally frowned upon to spray-paint your M4 bright pink and go on a patrol.

There is a silver lining to this one though. You don’t have to be a Colonel before you can get your hands on an M240-B.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

But it is kinda real with other people running to go steal YOUR package. Still a bit sour about that one.

(U.S. Navy photo by Public Affairs Specialist Joel Diller)

Care packages don’t include attack dogs

Care packages are fun in Call of Duty! If you rack up a high enough score, you can get lucky and find some pretty useful stuff in them, like controllers to drone strikes or a radio to call in an attack helicopter.

Actual care packages usually just include things like socks, hotel soaps, and a chocolate bar that melted on its way to the deserts of Iraq.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

You missed a spot.

(U.S Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Matt Hecht)

Prestiging isn’t as fun

Prestiging in Call of Duty is a way for players to start their career all over again. When they reach the rank of General of the Army, they can say “f*ck it” and go back to being a private for the fun of it so they can unlock everything all over again — this time with a way to let other players know how cool they are.

In the actual military, going back down to private usually involves a reduction in pay and a lot more menial labor.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

That’s not to imply that we don’t talk smack over the radios. No one really cares as long as you use “over” and “out.”

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Austin Mealy)

The chain of command discourages screaming obsenities over comms

It’s kind of a given that, when given a headset, kids will scream curse words that would have gotten us all slapped by our parents if they ever heard us use them. It doesn’t affect their gameplay, which is all that matters to them, so they’ll keep smack-talking you.

Even just the simplest of improper radio etiquette gets you a stern talking to by the operations sergeant major. Any mentions of doing unspeakable things to someone’s mother will be a near-instant way to “prestige” in rank.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“Here take a profile. That’ll cure everything!” said every doc ever.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Anthony Zendejas IV)

Healing involves more than hiding for four seconds

Being shot in the face in a video game is really easy to recover from. You just hide behind a rock until your screen stops being red and you’re good to go. Get back in there.

Real life medics and corpsmen like to think they have this ability when they prescribe you a Motrin and a change of socks — but they don’t. That also includes taking a knee and drinking water.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

In either world, do not lose your own dog tags.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jordan A. Talley)

Collecting enemy dogtags isn’t a thing

A fun game mode in Call of Duty is Kill Confirmed, where after players kill the enemy, they have to run over their corpse and collect their dog tags to get points for the kill.

If that was how operations were conducted in the real world, it would make being an artilleryman so much more difficult. And taking war trophies off dead bodies is actually frowned upon by the Geneva Convention.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

Freakin’ campers, man.

(U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Joshua C. Allmaras)

Stabbing people in the foot doesn’t instantly kill them

According to the game’s logic, it takes several bullets to the chest to drop somebody, shotguns only work if you’re within three feet of someone, and sniper rifles are great for clearing rooms with. If you manage to find the dude hiding in the corner with a sub-machine gun though, you can stab them to instantly kill them.

No. That is not how any of this works. The grenade launcher thing is pretty close though.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

What kind of military doesn’t allow its troops to single-handedly use a nuclear warhead at their own discretion? Oh? Literally every military? Nevermind.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Dengrier Baez)

No one will let you drop a nuke just because you killed 25 people

The ultimate prize for any Call of Duty is to get a 25-kill streak going without dying. If you can manage this, you can get a tactical nuke that you can drop to instantly win the match.

In reality, killing 25 people just gives you a drinking problem and night terrors.

MIGHTY GAMING

Video game streaming allows military veterans to fundraise for Fisher House

Streamers Activate Their Audiences to Support Military, Veterans, and Their Families

ROCKVILLE, MD. (March 23, 2021) – Veterans, military members, and their supporters now fundraise for Fisher House Foundation and other veteran service organizations through their performances on video game streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube, raising anywhere from a few hundred dollars to thousands within hours.

Jacob Hausman, a streamer who plays under the name Deltia, hosted a 24-hour charity stream which ultimately raised over $10,000. After taking a hiatus for over two years, the Army infantry veteran was returning to the game and was excited to return to the community he had cultivated.

“What was really cool to me about being in the military, I was 17 years old on active duty, I was coming in to people that were grown men having to take care of families,” he said. “And here I am not doing my own laundry at home, you know, spoiled little child. So it was cool because it was a big melting pot of different people from all over different cultures. And that’s what gaming is. Especially Elder Scrolls Online (ESO); there’s people from all over the world. So you’re still friends with them to this day, all over the world.”

fisher house gaming

When Jacob left the Army, streaming wasn’t the first thing on his agenda. He had some medical needs, and his mom would often take him to Omaha, Nebraska, nearly 100 miles away, for his appointments. Luckily, he didn’t need any overnight stays, but he thought a lot about how hard it was for families that did. He was excited when he heard that a Fisher House was being built in Omaha that would serve families like his.

When Jacob decided to return to streaming and the community he built, he decided that his first big stream would be a live streaming charity event that would support Fisher House Foundation.

Jacob and his team put together a video on YouTube that announced his return to the game. Streamers typically collect donations from their audience during a stream, but for the first week after his return, Jacob wanted people to raise funds for the Fisher House Foundation through a service called Streamlabs instead. The culmination of his fundraiser was a long streaming session where he promised to play ESO for 24 hours straight. Through hours of steady gaming, Jacob’s community rallied together and raised $10,064.33 – just surpassing the final goal of $10,000 in the last thirty minutes of the stream. 

While Jacob and his community can boast that they’re the first team to exceed $10,000 in a streaming fundraiser for Fisher House Foundation, they aren’t the first to help serve military and veteran families in this way.

More than a dozen gamers and streamers have held events for Fisher House Foundation over the past nine months and raised over $27,000. These grassroot streamers have played everything from Tekken and Call of Duty to Rocket League and Fall Guys.

Ryan Chastain, a streamer on Twitch who plays a variety of games on the channel RhinoShow, is a medically retired soldier who has raised over $1,100 for the Foundation. That’s enough to cover an almost-four-month stay for a family at a Fisher House.

“I started looking into military-based organizations because, you know, being retired military, that’s something that I’m always into,” Ryan said. “And I looked into the numbers, the percentage of the dollar that goes to the cause, and Fisher House was one of the highest.”

“A lot of my followers are veterans, and they are super behind the cause,” Ryan said. “And others are connected through family, you know, their dad or granddad or someone served. Fundraising has helped to tighten the community up. Everyone brought stories up during the stream and shared.”

Ryan donated streams three months in a row, all on the 22nd of the month, to raise awareness of veteran suicide. 

Streamers interested in fundraising for Fisher House can sign up at https://streamlabscharity.com/fisher-house-foundation-inc. Fundraisers of any type can sign up at https://fisherhouse.org/get-involved/fundraise/

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About Fisher House Foundation 
Fisher House Foundation is best known for its network of 91 comfort homes where military and veteran families can stay at no cost while a loved one is receiving treatment. These homes are located at major military and VA medical centers nationwide and in Europe close to the medical center or hospital they serve. Fisher Houses have up to 21 suites with private bedrooms and baths. Families share a common kitchen, laundry facilities, a warm dining room, and an inviting living room. Fisher House Foundation ensures that there is never a lodging fee. Since inception, the program has saved military and veteran families an estimated $525 million in out-of-pocket costs for lodging and transportation. www.fisherhouse.orgAbout Deltia’s Gaming
Deltia’s Gaming is a hub for gamers that provides coverage of gaming guides, discussions, and lifestyle advice. Launched in 2014, Deltia’s Gaming has garnered over 36 million views by creating helpful information for games like The Elder Scrolls Online (ESO) and Star Wars: The Old Republic (SWTOR). In his “Gamer to Gym Rat” series, Deltia’s Gaming promotes healthy living by showcasing his personal fitness journey to his supporters.  Visit www.DeltiasGaming.com to learn more about Deltia and his gaming initiatives.

MIGHTY GAMING

Terminator in ‘Mortal Kombat 11’ is just as wild as you’d imagine

The T-800 Terminator made famous by Arnold Schwarzenegger is the newest character in “Mortal Kombat 11,” and the murderous cyborg is a perfect fit for the savage fighting game franchise.

“Mortal Kombat” is best known for its over-the-top violence and the T-800 certainly doesn’t disappoint. The guest appearance features tons of references to the blockbuster film franchise too — when the Terminator is low on health, its skin will melt away to reveal its metallic endoskeleton, just like in the movies.


Mortal Kombat 11 – Terminator Fatalities, Brutalities and More!!

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Though Schwarzenegger didn’t reprise the role for the game, he authorized the use of his likeness and chose his own voice actor. The game also includes multiple costumes matching Schwarzenegger’s outfits in the different “Terminator” films.

The T-800 Terminator arrives ahead of the Schwarzenegger’s appearance in “Terminator: Dark Fate,” the sixth film in the “Terminator” franchise due out in theaters November 2019. The T-800 also appeared in Microsoft’s “Gears 5” in September 2019.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

The T-800 Terminator sporting Arnold’s older look from “Terminator: Dark Fate.”

(“Mortal Kombat 11″/NetherRealm Studios)

Previous “Mortal Kombat” games have also included multiple guest characters from horror and sci-fi movies, including Jason Voorhees from “Friday the 13th,” Freddy Krueger from “Nightmare on Elm Street,” and the xenomorph from the “Alien” franchise.

When “Mortal Kombat 11” was released in April 2019, it became the first game to top the sales charts on all three major video game consoles in more than a decade. “Mortal Kombat 11” the best-selling game of the year thus far and it’s on pace to surpass “Mortal Kombat X” as the best-selling game in franchise history.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

All six characters in the “Mortal Kombat 11” Kombat Pack.

(“Mortal Kombat”/NeatherRealm Studios)

The Kombat Pack adds six characters to the game’s original roster of 25. The Terminator is the third Kombat Pack character to be released, following Nightwolf, a Native American fighter first introduced in “Mortal Kombat 3,” and Shang Tsung, the soul-stealing villain at the center of the original “Mortal Kombat.” Actor Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa starred as Shang Tsung in the 1994 “Mortal Kombat” movie, and reprised the role for “Mortal Kombat 11.”

The final three Kombat Pack characters are Sindel from “Mortal Kombat 3” arriving on Nov. 26, 2019, the Joker from DC Comics planned for Jan. 28, 2020, and Spawn from Image Comics closing out the release schedule on March 17, 2020.

“Mortal Kombat 11” is out now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. The only way to get the Terminator right now is to purchase the full Kombat Pack for , but in a few weeks you’ll be able to buy the T-800 alone for .

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY GAMING

6 reasons why it would suck to be a Stormtrooper in Star Wars

With release dates just around the corner for the new film, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, and game, Battlefront II, it’s time to fill that Game of Thrones-sized hole in our hearts.


Related: This is what Game of Thrones can teach you about squad composition.

Out of all of the troops in the Star Wars canon, no one has it worse than the Stormtrooper. The Clones of the prequel saga were beloved across the Galactic Republic despite having numbers around the same as Eritrea’s military (both at 200,000). And the rebels had somewhat stable living conditions and maintained some form of identity.

But it’s the Imperial Stormtroopers and the First Order Stormtroopers that truly embrace the suck. Still, First Order Stormtroopers have been training since they were born, which is terrible in and of itself. The Stormtroopers of the original trilogy enlisted like troops today and would then realize their Imperial recruiter lied to them.

1. Loss of comrades

With 1,179,293 deaths on the first Death Star and 2,471,647 deaths on the second Death Star, roughly 120 on-screen deaths, and god knows how many Imperials have died elsewhere in the series, it’s fair to say that if you’re a Stormtrooper, death is all around you.

Troopers who would survive would be damaged by survivor’s guilt. The deaths of their comrades, best friends, and squad mates may not mean anything on the scale of the Galactic Empire, but it would devastate the surviving trooper.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
(Image via Funnyjunk)

2. No identity

Every Stormtrooper dons the signature white armor. Only differences would be by rank and position.

All of this would be more apparent when officers over you keep their identity and maintain far more privileges than the average buckethead.

The lost of one’s identity can be detrimental to their mental health. Being forced to work until exhaustion, training constantly (they’d have to, right? They’re formations are impeccable), constant control by higher-ups and other rigors of being a soldier without the benefit of “off-time” would be disastrous.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
I refuse to believe that every one of these Troopers avoided locking their knees and passed out. (Film by 20th Century Fox)

3. Chain of command would be at their throat

Speaking of constant control by higher-ups, the expression “sh*t rolls down hill” would take on a whole new meaning for Stormtroopers.

While in the novels and comics, Darth Vader is seen personally earning the loyalty of his troops, the same could not be said of the rest of a Stormtrooper’s chain of command.

In the real-world military, a threat from a General officer to the next echelon down is taken seriously, even if the consequence is a stern talking to. That rolls into more dire consequences until Article 15’s are tossed around like candy. Now imagine how that would multiply if the General knew he would be force choked in a board meeting for a slight mistake.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
This meme is true… from a certain point of view. (Meme via Twitter)

4. Acclimatization to new planets

Being deployed to Afghanistan from Fort Campbell, Kentucky can take some time to adjust for a U.S. soldier.

Now imagine going from Tatooine to Hoth to Endor. The suit may help with the weather, but the changes in gravity, atmosphere, and day length would still take its toll on a trooper. Expect to go to a new planet many times within the span of a few weeks.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
Yeah. Iraq could totally be Tatooine… wait… those brown marks… OH GOD! Please don’t tell me they had burn pits too! (Film by 20th Century Fox)

5. All of the ways physics would screw you over

Neil deGrasse Tyson would probably have a field day with this.

The science of Star Wars is still fairly vague. The series is more about the adventure than the theoretical physics. Throwing E=MC^2 out the window for a bit, allows nothing with mass to reach the speed of light (if not faster) without a power supply with infinite energy output — let’s keep this going.

The Galactic Empire governs the entirety of the galaxy, all 14,670 light years across. Because even if they could travel faster than the speed of light, everything on the planets would stay the same.

Getting from the capital of Coruscant to the other end of the galaxy on Tatooine would mean hundreds of lifetimes passed while you blinked. An order given on Hoth would take eons to reach Bespin.

But that doesn’t seem to be the case in the Star Wars franchise, meaning everyone is traveling faster than scientifically possible. What would that do to a body? (The answer: nothing good.)

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
Good luck at the Imperial VA… (Image via Reddit)

6. Aiming

And the most commonly attributed trait among the Stormtroopers is their terrible aim.

The first moments we see them they can gun down the rebels on the cruiser with ease. Every battle shown with nameless rebel characters, they shoot perfectly fine. Even a former General in the Clone Army, Obi-wan Kenobi, says “These blast points… Only Imperial Stormtroopers are so precise.”

You miss shooting a princess one time — a princess who is also your boss’ boss’ boss’ boss’ daughter, who your orders are to capture alive, and needs to stay alive so the tracking device can lead your moon-sized planet destroyer over the entire enemy base — you’re forever labeled as having sh*tty aim. No respect for just doing your job.

Other than that moment, they have no problem shooting Princess Leia. Once with a stun laser at the beginning of New Hope and again at the Battle of Endor.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy
Existence is pain to a Stormtrooper. (Image via Reddit)

MIGHTY GAMING

Soldiers sign up by thousands for Army eSports team

Recruiting officials are screening more than 4,000 applications from soldiers who hope to be chosen to play video games full time for the Army.

U.S. Army Recruiting Command may select up to 30 of the service’s top gamers to be on the new Army Esports Team and compete in local, regional and national gaming tournaments.

The Army Esports Team — which will become part of the new Marketing and Engagement Brigade based at Fort Knox, Kentucky — is a component of the new recruiting strategy the service launched after it missed its annual recruiting goal in 2018 by 6,500 soldiers.


Recruiting officials hope that soldiers who compete in these gaming tournaments will help the service connect with this specific, but growing, segment of the American youth population.

Roughly 35 percent of American males ages 21 to 35 participate in this market, which is estimated to be worth id=”listicle-2625430237″.9 billion, recruiting officials say. They often play multiplayer, first-person shooter games such as Overwatch and Call of Duty on systems ranging from personal computers to PlayStations, both on their own and in tournaments sponsored by civilian gaming leagues.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

Capt. Ryan Lewis talks to Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Jones and @twitch.tv shout caster James “jchensor” Chen during the Army Entertainment Esports Street Fighter V tournament 11 August 2018, at the Alternate Escapes Café at Fort Gordon, Georgia.

(U.S. Army 2nd Recruiting Brigade)

Young soldiers are part of this subculture, according to Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Jones, noncommissioned officer in charge of the Army Esports Team.

“Soldiers are showing a want and desire to not only play gaming … but also be in competitive gaming, and we understand that is a really good connection to our target market,” he said. “These soldiers will actually be hand-selected, so what we are doing is grouping them together and — based upon the title and platform that they wish to compete in — having them scrimmage within those groups to find out who are the best we have.”

Jones has been gaming since he was five years old and has a “custom-built PC, a Nintendo Switch, PS4 Pro and an Xbox One X. So if there is a game, I normally play it,” he said.

Part of the screening process will include ensuring that candidates also meet Army physical fitness, height and weight standards.

“Those soldiers will be screened from there to make sure that not only can they compete, but [they] are the top-quality soldier that we are looking for in order to move here to Knox to compete,” Jones said. “We want those soldiers, when they go to these events, to be able to articulate to the public.”

Team members will serve 36 months at Fort Knox and travel to tournaments, supporting the Army’s recruiting efforts at high schools and colleges, he said.

Many applicants who aren’t selected for the team could still be involved in the effort, Jones said.

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

“There are a lot of soldiers that just want to be a part of the community and want to help out even outside of competitive play,” he said. “We do have soldiers who have applied to the program and said, ‘I know I’m not competitive; however, I wish to help grow this.’ “

These soldiers can still participate on their off time, doing exactly what they already have been doing, Jones said.

“The difference is we are giving them a platform to play together … whether it be participating in online tournaments or just playing together and showcasing that to the American public,” he said.

“Essentially, soldiers are already playing video games,” Jones said. “We are just bringing to the light what is already in existence.”

The eSports world is widely shared on “Twist TV and all of these streaming services,” said Sgt. 1st Class Robert Dodge, a spokesman for Army Recruiting Command.

“We know that there is a large [portion] of the population out there that is watching these video game tournaments and watching people game, and this is allowing our soldiers who are already doing this and competing in these tournaments to get out there and connect with that large population,” Dodge said.

“So with this, we can touch a huge number of people and tell our Army story and help get them potentially interested in wanting to serve,” he added.

This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.

MIGHTY GAMING

A Marine designed this killer new ‘Call of Duty’ theme

If you’ve never heard of Max Uriarte, you’re in for a treat. He’s the Marine, writer, and artist best known for his comic Terminal Lance, which pokes fun at the Marine Corps from a grunt’s point of view. Now he’s teamed up with The Call of Duty Endowment to create the Call of Duty: “Night Raid” PlayStation 4 Dynamic Theme.

The Call of Duty Endowment “helps veterans find high quality careers by supporting groups that prepare them for the job market and by raising awareness of the value vets bring to the workplace.”

All proceeds from the sale of the Night Raid theme ($2.99) go directly to the endowment to help vets get jobs after service. The Call of Duty Endowment has placed over 57,000 veterans thus far. Their new goal is placing 100,000 veterans into high quality jobs by 2024.

Check out some of the awesome artwork below:


Call of duty Endowment night raid dynamic theme tier 3

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See “Night Raid” in action

Uriarte deployed to Iraq twice with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines. In 2007 he operated as a turret gunner out of Fallujah and in 2009 he was a combat photographer out of al Asad. His second deployment left a lasting impact on his civilian career as an artist — or, to be more specific, a Combat Artist.

“Combat Art is the act of capturing beauty in places you wouldn’t normally find it. It…exists solely for the purpose of creating art on the battlefield. When events are filtered through an artist’s eye, they capture things that maybe a camera does not, such as the feelings and emotion of the place or subjects. A photograph is objective — it shows reality. A sketch or a painting is subjective, it shows what the artist interpreted and what the artist saw that maybe no one else did (or could),” Uriarte told Fletcher Black of Activision.

Also read: Top 10 ‘Terminal Lance’ comics from last year

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

U.S. Marine Max Uriarte (left); ‘Terminal Lance’ Marines Abe Garcia (right)

‘Terminal Lance’ strikes true with Marines — and vets from all branches — who’ve dealt with some of the…color…military service has to offer. The comic makes light of the tedium and nonsense that come with the job.

But Uriarte also has a serious side. His graphic novel, The White Donkey, was based on his combat deployment in Fallujah. His upcoming graphic novel, Battle Born: Lapis Lazuli, promises to be a visceral examination of the effects of war on an Afghanistan province.

Who better to design art for the Call of Duty Endowment than a combat-experienced Marine with an artist’s eye and a creator’s hand?

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

Call of Duty®: Black Ops 4: C.O.D.E. Jump Pack

You can also support veterans by grabbing the new Call of Duty®: Black Ops 4 – C.O.D.E. Jump Pack, which includes a special wingsuit, parachute, and trail. 100% of the proceeds will go directly toward helping veterans get jobs after their military service.

Check out both the Jump Pack and the “Night Raid” Dynamic Theme on your PlayStation!

Lists

6 of the most outrageous WWIII video games, ranked

Predicting the future through popular fiction is always a headache. One specific (and inevitable) war, however, has been the setting for many works of exploratory fiction. Everyone has come up with their own unique twist on how the World War Trilogy is going to end because global audiences demand an over-the-top-ending to their trilogies.


Video games set in a fictional World War III span the range of plausibility and, accordingly, audience reception. Early games, like 1981’s Missile Command, were simple enough as to not raise eyebrows and breathtaking, modern games, like Battlefield 4 and Arma 3take a more down-to-earth approach.

But then there are the absolutely ridiculous games that hinge on insane premises, like that the next World War will involve us fighting our would-be robot overlords by the distant year 2010.

6. Terminator: Salvation (2009)

Yes, we were not-so-subtly pointing at this game. To the Terminator franchise’s credit, they were pretty optimistic about how advanced future technology would be back when the series kicked off in 1984.

But when this game references its own timeline as being “13 years after Judgement Day,” which, according to the films, was on Aug. 29, 1997, they effectively put all of one year between the game’s release and the over-the-top, dystopian futurescape… there’s just no excuse for that silliness.

We could forgive the game’s plot if it wasn’t so bad… even by 2009 standards.

5. Chromehounds (2006)

Like some of the other games on this list, alternate history is used to explain away inconsistencies. Chromehounds is a giant robot simulator that pits three fictional nations against each other that are totally not based on America, the USSR, and the Middle East.

You could customize your mech and choose a nation to fight under in real time against other players. The game was enjoyable while it lasted, but the servers shut down in 2010.

The world needs more customizable mech simulators.

4. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 (2011)

Compared to many of the other first-person shooters set in WWIII, Call of Duty: MW3 upped the ante. Sure, the story follows many of the standard tropes for WWIII — some Russian guy is evil, Europe gets invaded again, and *gasp* nuclear war is threatened.

What made 2011’s installment of Call of Duty so spectacular was that, during the single-player campaign, you got to live out all the action in various roles throughout the world. You play as several characters, all with unique backstories, while you hunt down the big bad.

The ending is just so, so satisfying.

3. Homefront: The Revolution (2016)

Based off the premise that North Korea takes over the world, this game is set in an alternate history where the hermit kingdom’s tech industry isn’t as laughable as it is in our timeline. The game places you in a Red Dawn-esque world where you need to start an underground resistance against Communist invaders.

The game wasn’t without faults — mainly in the narrative and character-development departments — but immersive open-world gameplay, complete weapon customization, and a level of difficulty that made you think through every action made the game stand out.

Wolverines!!!

2. Raid Over Moscow (1984)

Cold War-era games about the Cold War were the best. Originally released on the Commodore 64, Raid Over Moscow‘s story begins when three Soviet nukes launch and you’re the only space-pilot able to stop it. You fight your way through to the Kremlin (which, apparently, was the missile silo for all of the USSR’s nukes) before blowing it up. The most unbelievable thing about this game is that it goes out of its way to explain that America can’t just nuke them back because all US nukes were dismantled.

At the time, the game was fairly controversial. European nations were uneasy about selling a game that directly portrayed the destruction of the Kremlin. Unfortunately for them, the controversy only made European citizens want the game more.

Ahh, the good ol’ days when people feared 8-bit graphics could start an international incident.

1. Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2 (2001)

No WWIII game comes close to offering the same level of enjoyment and ridiculousness as Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2. To cut a very long and very confusing story short, Albert Einstein creates a time machine to kill a young Hitler. This leads the Soviets to grow unchecked and, in their liberty, research mind-control technology. And that’s just the first game.

This time around, you need to fight a psychic Rasputin stand-in — or you could choose to play as the Soviets. This game and its expansion pack, Yuri’s Revenge, are considered classics. You’ll need to play through it to understand, really.

The silly live-action cutscenes just make the game that much more hilarious.

MIGHTY GAMING

We’re giving Front Towards Gamer a new home

Today, we’re happy to announce that We Are The Mighty will be the new home of Front Towards Gamer (FTG), a community founded to support military veteran nonprofit Operation Supply Drop (OSD). Through a partnership with OSD, we’re going to carry the FTG torch, continuing to provide guides, reviews, videos, and articles to our growing gaming community.


“This partnership with We Are The Mighty gives our passionate content creators the opportunity to leverage WATM’s large and engaged audience and represent the ever-growing community of veteran gamers,” said Glenn Banton, CEO of OSD.

If you’re a former member of the FTG community, then we’re more than glad to have you. If you’re a gaming enthusiast, we’re sure you’ll love what you see. If you’re not a fan of gaming, then you might be asking yourself, “why should I care?”

Well, let’s take a look at the numbers:

6 shooter video games that require military strategy

According to a joint WATM-Maru/Matchbox survey from 2017 of over 1,700 active and retired military servicemen and women, gaming is an essential part of military culture. 73% own a gaming console, well above the 54% of the non-military population. 30% plan to purchase a new gaming console in the next year, nearly double the 17% of non-military.

One thing is clear: Both active service members and veterans care about games — and we do, too.

So, we’re pledging to bring you more of the content you’ve grown to love from FTG while contributing our own original and curated content as well. Additionally, we’re thrilled to continue to champion many of the events and programs hosted by OSD and their partners, including 8-Bit Salute (their annual gaming marathon fundraiser on Twitch and Mixer) and Games to Grunts (the online platform providing no-cost games to military service members and veterans).

Stay tuned for more great gaming content!

Editor’s note: If you’re a member of the military community with passions for gaming and writing and you’re looking to contribute your voice to our community, send us an email. We’re always looking for great contributors.

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