Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE

This is why taping your grenades is a terrible idea

Grunts everywhere are always searching for new ways to make their lives easier and more convenient. From buying lighter body armor to buying an original Magpul, we always want to improve our effectiveness on the battlefield. There are certain adopted rituals, however, that are actually more inconvenient than they are improvements. One such ritual is wrapping a single piece of duct tape around the pin of an M67 frag grenade.

This ritual stems from a fear that the pin might get snagged on a tree branch and get accidentally pulled, initiating the fuse countdown. Anyone who has pulled the pin on a grenade can tell you, though, it's not that simple. Any Marines will tell you that the process is actually, "twist pull pin" because if you try to just pull it straight out, it ain't happening.

Here's why it's a bad idea to tape your grenades:


1. The pin is not the only safety

Hollywood would have you believe that all you have to do to use a grenade is pull that pin, but it's not so simple. There're three safeties on the M67: the thumb clip, the pin, and the safety lever (a.k.a. the "spoon"). The entire purpose of the thumb clip is to ensure the fuse isn't triggered if the pin is pulled first.

We all know that one guy who pulled the pin before sweeping the safety clip and threw it into a room, waiting hopelessly for the grenade to go off... How embarrassing.

The training grenades have all those safeties for a good reason...

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Justin J. Shemanski)

2. You don't have time

According to the Marine Corps Squad Weapons Student Handout for the Basic School, the average individual can throw a frag 30 to 40 meters. Why is this important? It means that if you're using that glorious 'Merica ball, it means you're in close-quarters.

Do you have time to rip that tape off during a close encounter? No, you don't.

When you think about it, you're going through an unnecessary amount of effort for just a four second delayed explosion.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Akeel Austin)

3. The pin is already difficult enough to pull

The pin is in there just tightly enough so that you can rip it out quickly with the right amount of force, but it's not so easy that it slips out when snagged on an inanimate object.

It's not easy enough for you to pull it out with your teeth. Just take our word on that.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Chelsea Baker)

4. Experts say you shouldn't

In an Army.mil article, Larry Baker, then-FORSCOM explosives safety and range manager, is quoted as saying.

"...to the best of my knowledge, there is no evidence in the history of the M67 hand grenade to suggest that it requires taping and there is no evidence that a Soldier needs to tape it because of inherent safety issues."

Larry Baker, a Vietnam veteran, had nearly thirty years of experience at the time the article was written. He goes on to state that grenade pouches exist for the purpose of safely transporting grenades to your objective.

Notice how the pins are safely tucked inside.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Ashley McLaughlin)