Podcast

This is why it's so damn hard to play a veteran, according to an actor


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In this episode of the Mandatory Fun podcast, the crew speaks once again with standup comedian-turned-actor Tone Bell.

Tone isn't a veteran, but as always, there's a connection. On the Netflix show Disjointed, he plays a veteran who served on three Iraq combat deployments and now deals with the everyday struggles of a combat veteran.

To play the role, Tone studied multiple levels of PTS, the process of veteran transition, and the culture of cannabis, all while bringing his comedic charm to the character. These hot topics would send the average actor running toward the next potential part, but this comedian believes this role only made him a better thespian.

"You just want to get it right," Tone Bell says. "You want people to appreciate it and not go 'bullshit' that's not the way it happened."

Tone Bell as "Carter" doing what he does best — exhales the comedy. (Netflix)

Since Hollywood doesn't have the best track record of getting the veteran characters right, veterans tend to become very harsh in our criticism — something they feel entitled to do.

"It [the role of Carter] took a toll on me as a person in my day-to-day life," Bell admits.

Since Disjointed Part: 1 debuted on Netflix, Tone received copious amounts of support from the veteran community for finally portraying a veteran the right way and not going over-the-top with his performance.

Related: These veterans may be the future of cannabis-based pharmaceuticals

You may recognize Tone in a few other shows like 9JKL, The Flash, Truth Be Told, and Bad Judge with Kate Walsh.

In Disjointed, Tone plays the character of "Carter." He works as a security guard in a marijuana dispensary at Ruth's Alternative Caring owned by Ruth Feldman (played by Kathy Bates).

Carter and Ruth shelling out the laughs. (Image source from Netflix Disjointed)

Also Read: This Green Beret will change what you know about action movies

All episodes of  Disjointed are currently streaming on Netflix — so check them out. They are hilariously funny.

Mandatory Fun is hosted By:

Blake Stilwell: Air Force veteran and Managing Editor

Tim Kirkpatrick: Navy veteran and Editorial Coordinator

Orvelin Valle (aka O.V.): Navy veteran and Podcast Producer

Special Guest: Standup comedian turned actor Tone Bell

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