Pat Sheehan, a 32 year-old attending physician in New Orleans, Louisiana, is no stranger to the fast-paced environment of the emergency room.

"The ERs are always the frontlines," he told We Are The Mighty. "We treat every patient that comes through the doors 24/7/365, whether it's a gunshot wound or a stubbed toe, great insurance or no insurance, any race, religion, [or] creed."

When cases of the novel coronavirus began popping up around the country, Sheehan admits that his response was likely similar to many other medical professionals.



"I think I responded how most ER docs did, thinking that this is probably like all of the previous viruses that we were told could become a public health crisis - SARS, MERS, ebola, etc. - and never came to be," Sheehan said. "I'll be the first to admit that as an ER doc, I am not a public health expert. We are great at treating the critically ill and/or dying patients within our own emergency department, but we certainly defer to public health officials regarding crises like this. When we started to see things unfold in Seattle [and] NYC, we immediately buckled down and tried to prepare."

Sheehan works at the second busiest emergency department in the entire state of Louisiana.

"[We see] about 85,000 patients per year, so luckily we have significant resources at our disposal," he shared. "Our hospital was one of the first to implement an action plan and we actually built an entirely separate triage/waiting room area to siphon off all potential COVID patients from others presenting to the ER. We created several dedicated 'COVID Shifts' so that certain doctors and staff members would be treating all of the COVID patients rather than exposing everyone. I've certainly been lucky to work at a hospital where administration took the threat seriously and gave us all of the resources we needed."

While Sheehan takes a 'head down and treat the patients as they come in' approach, the weight of the situation is omnipresent.

"Seeing patients dying, not being able to have their family with them at the end, because of a sad, but necessary, no visitor policy," Sheehan said when asked about a low point of the pandemic.

Even outside the emergency room, he admits coronavirus remains top-of-mind.

"The hardest part is probably worrying about bringing it home to my family," he shared. "We have a newborn at home, so obviously that's constantly on my mind. We're being as careful as we can be, I strip off my scrubs on the front porch and go straight to the shower when I get home. I take my temperature twice a day. Washing my hands constantly. Wearing PPE all the time at work. It's impossible to be perfect though, so there is always a chance of me getting my loved ones sick."

Through the crisis, Sheehan has documented his experience on Instagram, creating posts and videos with easy to understand information, terminology simplification and even explanations of how equipment, like ventilators, work.

"More than anything I would just want people to understand how hard ERs work across the country work to treat the sick and dying every day, not just during COVID-19," Sheehan said. "If you have to wait a few hours or somebody forgets to get you that blanket you asked for, just remember that it might be because in the room next to you staff is trying to revive an unresponsive infant, performing CPR on an overdose, or comforting family of a patient that didn't make it. We'll do our best to help you and make you comfortable, but sometimes we just need a little understanding."