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The Taliban surrendered after hearing this female airman's voice (and getting hit with high explosives)


Lt. Col. Allison Black, commander of the 319th Special Operations Squadron, became the first woman in her special ops navigator field. Now younger generations of airmen can take the same path while embarking on their own journey in the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force video // Jimmy D. Shea)

Under the cover of night, then-1st Lt. Allison Black left her tent in Uzbekistan to walk to a preflight brief. Hours later, she'd be making history.

On this November night in 2001, the United States was hoping to bring to justice those responsible for the attacks two months earlier in New York City and Pennsylvania, and at the Pentagon.

Flying over the skies of Afghanistan, Black, who is now a lieutenant colonel and the commander of the 319th Special Operations Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Florida, was the navigator on the AC-130H Spectre. As the navigator, she was charged with several duties, one of which was to be the single voice communicating from the aircraft to troops on the ground.

AC-130U Gunship
(U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock)

As the gunship fired everything it had upon the Taliban, expending 400 40 mm rounds and 100 105 mm rounds, the Northern Alliance leader, Gen. Abdurrashid Dostum (often referred in the media and around camp fires as "Dostum the Taliban killer") heard Black's voice communicating to the joint terminal attack controller on the ground to better understand where rounds need to be fired.

"He heard my voice and asked the special ops guys 'Is that a woman?' and they said 'Yeah, it is,'" Black recalled. "He couldn't believe it. So he's laughing and says, 'America is so determined, they've brought their women to kill Taliban.' He calls the guys we're shooting and says 'You guys need to surrender now. American women are killing you … you need to surrender now.'"

The morning after that first mission, those remaining Taliban members surrendered.

Lt. Col. Allison Black, commander, 319th Special Operations Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Florida. (Photo by Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

"My first combat mission began the collapse of Taliban in the north," said Black, who became the first female to be awarded the Air Force Combat Action Medal.

This operation would have looked different in 1992.

Challenge accepted

When Black joined the Air Force in 1992, females weren't allowed to fly combat missions. That didn't change until 1993, as the Air Force opened all but less than 1 percent of career fields to women, with the remainder scheduled to open up by early 2016.

At just over 5 feet tall, the Long Island, New York, native seeks and embraces challenges and doesn't play for second place — a mindset that led her to the Air Force.

"The Air Force seemed to be the hardest service to get into. That got my attention," Black said. Arriving at basic military training as an enlisted Airman, she was guaranteed a job in the medical career field. But her plans changed when a survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialist briefed Black's flight on his career field and challenged the group of trainees to join SERE.

"I didn't know how to chop down a tree, didn't know how to kill a rabbit, didn't know how to set a snare, but I was willing," Black said. "It sounded challenging."

After more than four years as a SERE instructor, including time as an arctic survival instructor, Black wanted another challenge.

Upon finishing her degree, Black earned a commission as a second lieutenant and headed off to become a navigator — a career field available on several airframes, including bombers and fighters.

U.S. Air Force pilot and co-pilot from the 73rd Special Operations Squadron (Photo by: U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cory D. Payne)

There was just one airframe Black wanted: the gunship — specifically, the AC-130H gunship — so she could be on the main flight deck with the pilot, right in the thick of things.

But becoming an Airman, a SERE specialist, an officer and a navigator wasn't enough — she wanted to join the elite Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC).

"It was exciting. It's special operations command. You're in a small force, asked to do tough missions — missions that operate in the gray," Black said.

Black didn't realize it at the time, but when she arrived at the 16th Special Operations Squadron, then stationed at Hurlburt Field, she became the first female navigator in that unit and on the AC-130H.

"The thought of being the first was the furthest thing on my mind," she said. "At that time, I was so focused on being really good at my job and not letting any naysayers get in my way."

Not only was the milestone the furthest thing from her mind, but it was also something she didn't want to be on anyone else's mind either.

"I wasn't trying to change anyone's opinion on whether I should or shouldn't be in a job," Black said. "I wanted to be an asset. I wanted to be sought after. I wanted to be really good at what I did. I didn't want to come in second; I wanted to be first."

Each person defines success differently.

Black doesn't define success by the medals on her chest or the oak sleeves on her shoulders.

"By not trying to make a statement, I think I found success. I didn't have an agenda. I didn't join the Air Force, I didn't join SERE, and I didn't join AFSOC to prove that women can do a job," Black said. "I joined all those things because of the challenge and the career field and the sexy mission. And I just happen to be a woman doing it. And, fortunately, because of my successes, it brought more visibility to 'Hey, it doesn't matter if it's a guy or a girl.'"

Paying it forward

"It wasn't until years later … when I'd have young female or male Airmen tell me that my story was inspiring, that hearing what I was able to do in AFSOC gave them the confidence to raise their hands and go forward. It was humbling," Black said.

Black remembers vividly a point in her career where it was clear that she needed to pay it forward.

After a speech to members from base, a female senior airman approached her and referenced the part of the presentation when Black said it has been possible to mother children while also being an Airman. The senior airman was about to get out of the Air Force because she didn't have anyone telling her the same thing.

AC-130U Gunship
(U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Julianne Showalter)

"She's a senior master sergeant now, and we still keep in contact," Black said.

Seeing these tangible results from telling her story, Black began to reach out even more.

"It's second and third order effect that just at the virtue of me doing my job, it highlighted that women can succeed. It highlighted the opportunity for women: 'Hey you're going to be accepted. They're going to respect what you bring to the fight,'" Black said.

When she arrived at AFSOC, she didn't have a cadre of female navigators to offer her mentorship. What she did have were those she refers to as her everything: her husband, Ryan, who was also a SERE instructor, and a supply of male mentors who were all willing to help a teammate grow, regardless of which bathroom stall they use.

"All of the gentlemen I've worked for have equipped me with the skills to be a good leader. They gave me that opportunity to shine and to step up," she said. "You're judged on game day. You can practice every day of the week, but it's what you do on Sunday that counts. And I don't believe in 'Everyone gets a trophy."

A new generation

When Black joined the Air Force in 1992, her options looked a lot different than they do for female Airmen today. However, because of her success and the success of many others like her, there are more options in the Air Force for females than in any other service.

This success gave people like 1st Lt. Margaret Courtney many options and paths to walk — or even fly.

1st Lt. Margaret Courtney (Photo by: Master Sgt. Jeffrey Allen)

Just over two years ago, Courtney had the world on a string, with options in droves. The Baylor University graduate, who majored in neuroscience, managed to pass the Law School Admission Test while working at a mental health institution helping to rehabilitate individuals with drug dependencies. Her potential career paths were in no way limited.

But she wanted more. She wanted a bigger challenge even than graduating with a neuroscience degree and going to law school.

After talking to recruiters from three different branches of the military, and after pinging several friends and family members, Courtney noticed a trend.

"It's funny — everyone who wasn't in the Air Force recommended the Air Force," Courtney said.

After commissioning as an officer and going through training to become a navigator, Courtney faced a decision — what airframe did she want to work on for the remainder of her Air Force career?

"I remember going through (navigator) training, and there are several airframes that require (combat systems officers). You're going through those aircraft and imagining your life three to 10 years down the road," Courtney said. "How different would my life look if I joined this community or that community?"

The number of opportunities the Air Force has given Courtney caught her off guard.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder)

"It's not too bad to be in your young 20's and have basically limitless possibilities laid out in front of you. I'm like 'Goodness gracious, let me look into it all,'" Courtney said. "I feel like I'm hitting this whole job and career at the sweet spot. I've had plenty of people ahead of me pave the way."

Knowing what's ahead for Courtney, Black is excited, and almost proud of the options female Airmen now have.

"It's exciting — hearing about Lieutenant Courtney," Black said. "I can't help but to reflect on when I was a lieutenant and how excited I was to come to the mission, then, after 9/11, to go and fight. I'm excited for her, because I know she's going to find the reward."

Black doesn't just see the past and the present, but the future keeps her motivation high, knowing the possibilities now out there for females in the Air Force.

"The success is that we don't hear about it because they're blended in," said Black said of current female aircrew members. "They're just people doing great things – male and female. That's success."

When Black arrived at Hurlburt in 2000, she was wide-eyed and ready to take on the world. She saw a fork in the road and committed to a direction, not knowing the path. Now that she's traveled that path, she feels she has a responsibility to people like Courtney and other female Airmen.

"She doesn't know what she doesn't know," said Black of Courtney, who's even more wide-eyed than the prior-enlisted Black was at this stage in her AFSOC career. "That's where people like me come in. Lt. Col. Megan Ripple is the director of (operations) at the 4th Special Operations Squadron. We arrived here at Hurlburt together. We are taking the initiative to reach out to these women to prepare them for deployment, to teach them all the things we didn't know."

Considering Courtney's only job up until this point has been to learn and receive training, she's growing more and more excited to fly this new path.

"I'm still trying to figure out how everything works," said Courtney, who was recently assigned to the 4th SOS. I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. I can't wait to actually partake in it, and do what I've been training for. They want you to learn, they want you to train; they want to set you up for success. No one really cares where you've come from, what your rank is. They care about how much work you put into your job every day. If you're competent and put forth the work, you get rewarded."

US Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Jeremy T. Lock

Though there are some years between Black and Courtney, they noted a common mentality present when they joined the AFSOC community.

"I haven't noticed if anyone cares about me being a girl or not," Courtney said. "They care about how good you are at what you do, and if you care or not, and if you take pride in your work."

Letting your work speak for itself is a welcome reality for Courtney.

"It's definitely a relief that you're judged based on the quality of your work, and nothing else," Courtney said, pointing out that the impact of the mission is way too important to care about the irrelevant. "AFSOC is pretty open about it. The game we play is life or death."

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