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6 reasons why the guys from 'The Hangover' are like an Army unit

The internet has previously noticed that the guys from "The Hangover" bear certain similarities to a military unit, but these guys function a lot more like an Army unit than drunk civilians have any right to. Here are six reasons why "The Hangover" is really about bad soldier stereotypes.


1. The lieutenant is only there because the commanding officer said he should be and he screws everything up.

For the eight of you who haven't seen the movie, "The Hangover" centers around a group of guys who lost their friend, Doug (labeled "The CO" in the meme), and have to find him before his wedding.

How did they lose their friend? Alan, "The lieutenant," roofied them. Alan is the brother of the bride and so Doug said he should be allowed to come. Two other characters tell Doug he should leave Alan behind, but the Doug insists on bringing him. Alan repays this kindness by attempting a blood pact and then drugging the group.

2. The senior enlisted is obsessed with the paperwork and is always on his phone.

Stu, the "Senior Enlisted," wants to keep everything under the radar and so he is obsessed with the paper trail. He wants to use cash rather than credit cards, needs to get his marriage annulled and out of the public record, and is always on his phone lying to his girlfriend.

Extra bonus: Stu fits the worst enlisted stereotypes in a few additional ways. He eloped with a stripper/escort at a chapel with military discounts and he constantly tries to sound more important than he is (calling himself a doctor when everyone insists he go by dentist).

3. The CO thinks everyone will follow the rules despite all evidence pointing to the contrary.

Doug picks up the rest of the pack in a Mercedes his future father-in-law loaned him. On the way to the hotel, he seems to honestly believe that everyone will act like responsible adults. He even gives some ground rules for the car even though it's clear his friends can't be trusted.

At this point, Alan has revealed he can't go within 200 feet of a school or Chuck E. Cheese. Phil, "The Enlisted," has screamed profanities in a neighborhood and is currently drinking in the car. Stu, "The Senior Enlisted," has asked the team for their help lying to his girlfriend so she won't know they went to Vegas. Doug goes right on trusting them, even after Alan discusses a plan to count cards and Phil tricks Stu into paying for a villa on the strip.

4. The junior enlisted causes a lot of the chaos but takes none of the responsibility.

As the meme noted, the enlisted guy does all the work. But he shouldn't really complain since he caused most of the chaos after they woke up in the hotel. When the group finds out they stole a cop car, he drives it onto a curb, turns the lights on, and uses the speakers to hit on women. After the cops catch up with them, he gets the group shocked with stun guns. While visiting a chapel, he leaves a baby in a hot car, telling the others, "It's fine. I cracked the window."

5. The lieutenant won't stop asking dumb questions and saying stupid things.

Alan just can't find his way in the world, much like a new lieutenant. He asks the hotel receptionist if the hotel is "pager-friendly." He gives an awkward, prepared speech before he roofies the group. When he learns Stu accidentally gave away his grandmother's "Holocaust ring," Alan tells the group he "didn't know they gave out rings at the Holocaust."

6. CO can't solve problems without help from the unit.

Doug, like a bad commander stereotype, can't get stuff done without his unit. For most of the first movie, he is trapped on the roof of a hotel. It's revealed that he tried to get help by throwing his mattress off the roof. That's a good start, but he was up there for more than 24 hours. He was fully clothed with a sheet but didn't yell for help, turn the sheet into a flag, or use the sheet to prevent his serious sunburn. He could've gotten attention by cutting an air conditioning hose, or at least tried to get back inside through the access door.

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