6 types of Commo guys you'll meet in your first unit - We Are The Mighty
Military Life

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Your first duty station is always full of surprises. You’ll quickly learn that your career is nothing like how you envisioned it in the recruiter’s office. The troops you serve with are nothing like the ones portrayed in films.


Every troop comes from a different walk of life and each has their own story. That being said, when you finally get to know the troops you’re serving with, there are always going to be a few of the same archetypes.

These are the guys you’re going to meet when you visit the commo shop.

Related: The 6 types of lieutenants you just can’t avoid in the military

1. The bonus chaser

It’s no secret that the commo world is extended some nicer enlistment bonuses. The Pentagon sees it as a necessary bribe to fill a high-demand MOS within the service. The bonus chaser signed up for these benefits and they’ll happily let you know it.

This troop is completely average. They’re nothing special, they keep their nose clean, and they begrudgingly say “roger” to every task that comes their way. They’re boring and, chances are, they’ve never said a word to anyone outside of the S-6 — they probably won’t say anything to those guys either.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Yep. Just holding the handmic for 12 hours, pretending they’re awake. (Photo by Senior Airman Chris Willis)

2. The “trooper”

Commo guys work closely with the higher-ups. The radio guy never leaves the officer’s side and the computer guy is always fixing their email. The “trooper” enjoys the attention.

They belt out, “you’ve got it, sir! Right away, sir!” like it was their calling card. They do this because they enjoy the fact that they’re needed more than the average Joe and take pride in their work.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Some call it brown nosing, others call it wanting to be useful. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Shiloh Capers)

3. The talkative nerd

There’s no denying it: the computer side of the commo world attracts a lot of nerds. At some point you’ll probably hear the sergeant major scream, “my internet went out! Someone get me those S-6 nerds!” And, for the most part, they’re right.

These aren’t your typical high-school nerds who sit quietly in the cafeteria. No, these nerds have learned how to talk to others and the military encourages troops to interact — which gives the computer guys an opportunity to explain all of their Game of Thrones fan theories… even if you’ve never watched the show.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
On the other hand, they’re probably the person you go to get movies down range. (Photo by Spc. Kirby Rider)

4. The extreme jock

This commo hates everyone they work with — almost entirely because of the talkative nerd. They’ve heard all about Bitcoin investing, they’ve heard every reason why the Star Wars prequels were just misunderstood for their time, and they’ll probably snap the next time they hear the phrase, “anime waifu.”

They’ll do anything to get away and have at least one conversation involving a sport. They’ll overcompensate to prove to everyone that they’re not the talkative nerd.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Anything to get out of the office, right? (Photo by Pfc. Kirby Rider)

5. The former grunt

This commo guy reclassed for better benefits after a few deployments, during which they did some real sh*t.

It’s sad watching the former grunt work. It eats them up inside every time they need to fill out a work order to get sent to civilian contractors to finally get the admin password so they can reinstall the operating system. This just isn’t their world. Watching these guys work with technology is like seeing a former college football star work at the Apple Store.

If you listen closely, what sounds like a head banging against their desk is actually “kill me” in Morse code repeated over and over again.

Related: 5 stereotype radio guys get stuck with

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

6. The POGiest POG to ever POG

On the scale of grunt to POG, you can typically put most combat arms troops on the grunt side. Even a support MOS is part grunt by proximity. But then there’re these guys.

Their pay grade says E-6, but their actions make you question how they even passed Basic Training. Hell, they won’t even make excuses when you call them a POG. They’ll probably just retort with some sh*t like, “Yeah? Well, I can take away your computer access with the stroke of a keyboard!”

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Military Life

Why death iconography is a beloved part of military culture

Take a look at the naming convention of any combat arms battalion. Chances are that alpha company is “Assassins,” bravo company is “Barbarians,” and, because there’s no clever, hardcore, historical fighter that starts with ‘C,’ charlie company will be “Reapers” or something.


Toss in the occasional Spartans, outlaws, rebels, anarchists, dragons, zombies, gladiators, and make sure to leave some clever pun for headquarters (something like “Troubleshooters” — get it? It’s an IT thing and it’s because they shoot trouble. Hey, don’t you roll your eyes at me, I didn’t make it up…).

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Let’s not forget everyone who uses The Punisher’s skull on everything…
(Courtesy Photo)

Recently, the Australian Chief of Army, Lieutenant General Angus Campbell, issued a directive to ban any and all “death symbology and iconography” from the Australian Army, effective immediately. This includes all of the above-mentioned names and forbids the use of symbols like skulls and weapons in logos (which, technically, should include the most Australian special operations unit, the 1st Commando Regiment, whose logo pictures a Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife stabbing a boomerang. Just sayin’).

Lieutenant General Angus Campbell said,

“Such symbology… is always ill-considered and implicitly encourages the inculcation of an arrogant hubris and general disregard for the most serious responsibility of our profession — the legitimate and discriminate taking of life.”

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Because infantrymen from a country where everything can kill you shouldn’t be associated with things that can kill you.
(Photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

With the utmost respect towards the Australian Chief of Army, hardcore names and symbols don’t take away from the seriousness of combat. It never has and never will. It boosts the morale of our troops while demoralizing the enemy. If even a single life of any American, NATO, ANZAC, and any other allied troop is saved by the psychological impact of these symbols, then repeatedly telling troops they’re hardened killers is worth it.

Death iconography bands the troops together because it’s a fun symbol to be associated with. It’s powerful. It hypes them up for the ultimate reality — some of them will fight in combat and see real consequences. The symbols serve as warnings to the enemy that these people are not to be messed with.

Military Life

You never forget your first … duty station, in memes.

You never forget your first — that’s what they all say. Whether service member or military spouse, your first duty station sticks with you for the duration of your military existence. Why? Because it’s all-new, and likely not so shiny. You have to learn things the hard way, you never know where anything is located, housing is a mess, and that’s not even the bulk of it. 

PCSing certainly gets easier with time, but when it comes to your first move — your first oh-so-very-painful PCS — it’s an experience you won’t soon forget. 

Take a look at these all-too-common instances as described in totally accurate memes. 

  1. When you realize you have no idea what you are doing
6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Deep breaths. 

2. Finally getting your HHG and trying to unpack like

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Are we done yet?

3. Calling the housing office 10 times a day

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Whatcha got??

4. All the training events for new families

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Can we go now?

5. Trying to find the closest grocery store:

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Do your best work, GPS.

6. Until you finally get acclimated to your surroundings

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Everything is different here.

7. Trying to meet the new neighbors like:

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Yo guys!

8. SRSLY let’s BFF

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Find your own kind of weird out there. 

9. More unpacking

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Seriously how long does this even take? 

10. There are just so many distractions

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

It’ll get done … eventually.

Your first move, and your first duty station stick with you for the long haul. More often than not, it’s because of the growing pains along the way. Tell us about your most difficult lessons learned with your first PCS experience.

MIGHTY TRENDING

The Navy’s pilots will get huge bonuses for staying in

Hey, want to make an extra $175,000? Well, if you’re a Navy fighter pilot and you’re willing to spend another five years in the service, that pile of cash can be yours! Now that we have the big-ass headline and the promise of a lot of moolah out of the way, let’s get down to the fine print.


6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
E-2C pilots are among those eligible for up to $175,000 in bonuses under the Aviation Department Head Retention Bonus. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andrew Langholf)

According to a Navy release, the active-duty component is offering big cash in the form of Aviation Department Head Retention Bonuses and Aviation Command Retention Bonuses. The aim here is to keep talented, hardworking pilots on active duty. The Navy, essentially, is looking to avoid ending up in the same dire straits as the Air Force in terms of personnel shortages.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Pilots of multi-role fighters, like this F-35, are eligible for big bonuses. (U.S. Navy photo by Dane Wiedmann)

Here’s how the bonuses will work, according to NAVADMIN 065/18. The Aviation Department Head Retention Bonus is open to any aviator selected for promotion to lieutenant commander. Pilots have the option of signing a contract of either three years or five years. Those who sign five-year deals prior to ADHSB selection results going public can get a bonus of up to $35,000. Your best bet for getting the big money is to fly F/A-18C Hornets, F-35 Lightnings, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers, or E-2C Hawkeyes. MH-53E Sea Dragon pilots, a minesweeping version of the CH-53E Super Stallion, are also eligible to for big bonuses.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Pilots of the MH-53E Sea Dragon are also eligible for the $175,000 over five years – the only rotary-wing pilots who get the big money. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman William Carlisle)

Those who sign up for the Aviation Command Retention Bonus can get $100,000 over three years ($34,000 for the first year, $33,000 for the other two). Eligibility is limited to those officers who hold the rank of commander and who have been screened for becoming the commanding officer of an eligible operational, operational training, or special mission command. They agree to stay on for three years, which will include a tour after their squadron command. The obligation ends at the end of that post-command assignment or 22 years of active service, whichever comes later.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
EA-18G Growler pilots can get up to $175,000 bonuses. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Perlman)

Aviation duty incentive pay (better known as flight pay) is also getting a boost, especially for those who are in administrative milestone billets. That only could net you a cool $1,000 in cash per month!

Those interested in the opportunity to earn big-money bonuses should get more details on the Navy’s website.

Military Life

5 reasons a draft is a terrible idea

You’ll meet people, both on social media and in real life, who argue that a solution to a widespread lack of discipline is to start drafting citizens right out of high school to serve in the military in some capacity. Whether you think there really is a discipline problem today or not, the truth remains the same — a draft outside of a wartime is unnecessary and extremely toxic.


The thing people don’t realize is that the United States military thrives on the fact that its members are volunteers. The reason our military is so efficient is because the people who join want to be there. While that may not remain the case for every service member for the entire duration of their contracts, you’ll still find most of them serving with honor until the job’s done.

Related video:

 

Here’s why having a draft would ruin that.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Each of these recruits may run the Department of Defense around ,000.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)

The cost

The cost of training a single service member is pretty high already. Spending tons of money training people who don’t want to be there only to have most of them leave the service as soon as humanly possible is just not worth it. We already have plenty of people who join voluntarily and, in boot camp or somewhere else along the line, decide they made a wrong choice. Suddenly, the tons of money spent training them goes down the drain.

It’s all the people who make it through training and complete their service honorably that justify these losses.

A draft is basically indentured servitude

People who serve today feel like they’re overworked and underpaid. When the government is faced with absorbing tons of money lost due to wasted training expenses, where do you think the cuts will start?

If you felt a sharp pain in your wallet just now, then you already know.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

There are people relying on others to do their jobs so they might stay alive.

A draft is dangerous

A problem with forcing people to do a job is that they won’t care about doing it well. When those aloof people play key roles in the infantry, failing to do the job well might be fatal. These people may not care about holding security or staying awake on watch, which can needlessly endanger the lives of all the people who want to do their job the right way.

You’ll have a lot more sh*t bags

There are tons of people who “slip through the cracks” in the military already. They have no business being in the service, but somehow manage to avoid discharge. Forcing people, against their will, to serve is going to increase those numbers.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

The volunteers are what make the military great. Let’s not mess that up with dumb ideas.

(U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Matt Britton)

An all-volunteer force is much better

As stated before, our military is as good as it is because the people who serve chose to be there. They want to do a good job. Furthermore, it’s a good feeling to know that you’re doing the hard work that not everyone is cut out for. By enacting a draft, we would lose the very thing that makes the military great: pride.

Military Life

5 reasons why troops and first responders get along so well

There’re no two groups of Americans that get along quite as well as the military and the first-responder community. It makes sense on a broad level; they’re both occupations filled by people who hope to help their fellow man and make the world a slightly better place.


But it goes much deeper than that — it’s not just a shared, we-got-10-percent-off-our-meal-at-a-restaurant connection.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Civilians just don’t understand the actual amount of paperwork and bureaucracy that happens in both. That fact alone is why so many police officers love ‘Hot Fuzz.’

(Photo by Sgt. Elizabeth Taylor)

They share the same culture

Part of what makes the armed forces fun is the inter-service banter exchanged between branches. Funnily enough, first responders playfully mock one another as well.

EMS will throw some jabs in jest at firefighters and firefighters will tell jokes at the police’s expense. Hell, even within the different bureaus, police will riff on each other. Law enforcement officers and firefighters, just like Marines and airmen, will happily mock one another all day long, but treat each other as family when push comes to shove.

This is just one of the many areas in which the two cultures overlap.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

They also come up with the same off-the-wall insults that troops love.

(Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Pedro A. Rodriguez)

They share the same lingo

Troops say a lot of little things that they don’t realize are uncommon in the civilian world, but the lingo is easily understood by first responders.

The phonetic alphabet is an obvious one, but it makes my veteran heart grow knowing that police also call each other blue falcons.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

The hardest times for both are often the memorial services.

(Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Fowler)

They share the same bad days

The sad reality is that the bad days both groups experience can be hard to explain to civilians.

There are fantastic moments that you can be proud to share with your children and your spouse, but helping the world will also show you things that’ll keep you up at night — you can’t know this feeling without experiencing it.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Have you ever been to a fire station? It’s basically a frat house in between calls.

(Photo by Jamal Wilson)

They share a strong bond of brotherhood with their peers

It’s no secret that troops are close to one another — and first responders are no different.

They grow together through shared pain, mockery, and brief moments of brevity until the sh*t hits the fan again. This level of camaraderie is respected across both groups.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

Or you enlist for a change of pace but end up doing the same thing in a different uniform.

(Photo by Airman 1st Class Octavius Thompson)

Many have served in both

The main reason why so many of each community can relate with one another is because many troops leave the service and make a living as a first responder, and vice versa.

During a moment of peace in Basic or Boot Camp, it’s not uncommon to hear a new troop say that they were a volunteer firefighter for a few semesters in college.

Articles

17 images that perfectly show the misery of returning your gear

Over the past few days, you’ve been collecting exit signatures for your check-out sheet, and low and behold, you’re almost home. The process has been relatively straightforward up until this point.


The last item you need to get signed off is from the Central Issue Facility, or supply, where you need to check in all of your gear. Supply is one of the last stops a service member makes before obtaining their official DD-214.

Sounds easy enough, right?

Wrong. If one aspect of your gear is not check-in ready, integrating back into civilian population will be delayed.

Related: 17 images that show why going to the armory sucks

So check out our list of what it typically takes to check in your gear and move on with your life.

(This is based on many true stories)

1. What it looks like when you’re on your way to the central issue on a Friday afternoon.

Oh, come on. (Images via Giphy)

2.When you walk inside and all you see are other troops waiting in a long a** line.

There’s too many to count. (Images via Giphy)

3. To add insult to injury, everyone who works there looks slow and grumpy.

Why do I hate life? (Images via Giphy)

4. After waiting what felt like an eternity, you finally haul your heavy gear over to the counter and begin the checkout process.

So heavy. (Images via Giphy)

5. You make it to the counter, and just as your morale has been boosted, you realized you’re at the slowest worker’s section.

Please, hurry the f*ck up! (Images via Giphy)

6. The clerk starts to review all your gear, pulling everything out piece-by-piece — most of which you never used.

And we mean most things. (Images via Giphy)

7. After completing the inventory, the clerk finds an issue with your almost squared away paperwork. All of your gear is clean enough to pass, but there’s a missing signature.

No way freakin’ way. (Images via Giphy)

8. Your superior officer’s signature is missing for an expensive piece of gear which got destroyed while you were deployed. The clerk informs you that you can either pay for it yourself or get the signature before you can get out of the military.

You can’t believe what you’re hearing.

I ain’t paying for sh*t. (Images via Giphy)

9. You speed back to your company HQ to find your CO.

Pedal to the metal. (Images via Giphy)

10. You dash into the HQ in search of the man or woman who can set you free.

Where are they? (Images via Giphy)

11. You find your superior, he or she signs the paperwork and then your emotions take over.

This may be wrong but it feels right. (Images via Giphy)

12. Now that you got your signature, it’s time to head back to central issue.

Almost to the finish line. (Images via Giphy)

13. You get back the central issue building and attempt to eyeball the person who helped you earlier to avoid waiting in line again.

Look at me. (Images via Giphy)

Also Read: 33 images that perfectly portray your first 96-hour liberty

15. It worked. The clerk spots you and waves you over. You hand her the signed paperwork, she looks it over and now you wait.

The anticipation grows. (Images via Giphy)

16. The clerk slowly stamps your paperwork. You’re clear.

You want to get mad, but you can’t at this point. (Images via Giphy)

17. You did it! Now go get your DD-214 and move on with your life.

Five years of college here I come. (Images via Giphy)

Articles

Military spouse helps pass legislation to benefit military retirees in Arkansas

When Brittany Boccher was approached by retired Major General Kendall Penn and the Arkansas Secretary of State Military and Veterans Liaison Kevin Steele to help get proposed legislation passed to protect the retirement pay of military retirees, Boccher jumped at the opportunity to serve her current community.


Boccher, a mother of two and the spouse of a special agent with the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, began the task by hosting the General and the Military and Veteran’s Liaison at one of the Little Rock Spouses’ Club meetings, where the men presented the proposed legislation to the local military spouses.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Brittany Boccher was invited to attend the signing of legislation into state law on Feb. 7, 2017. The law exempts military retiree pay from state taxes. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Boccher.)

The proposal specifically addressed the taxation of pay for military retirees. While active duty personnel in Arkansas do not pay a state tax, retired veterans’ pay is taxed.

That tax didn’t sit well with Governor Asa Hutchinson and Lieutenant Governor Tim Griffin, who have seen their state ranked at 48 in attracting and retaining working age military retirees and veterans.

“A lot of them will retire really young in their 40s, 50s, 60s. And what do they do? They have that steady income and start other businesses or they go work a new job,” Griffin said.

Hutchinson agreed, saying, “I believe it will help us to bring more military retirees here, welcome them back to Arkansas.”

Boccher committed to calling or emailing every state senate committee member directly to discuss his or her support for Hutchinson’s proposed tax initiative. Then she set out to round up military families that would benefit the most from the initiative in order to testify before the state house and senate committees.

Boccher, a business owner in Arkansas herself, told We Are the Mighty that her family reflected the target audience the state was hoping to attract with the proposed tax break.

“They were seeking a young family close to retirement to showcase that they would have a second career after the military. We are a 17 year military family, we’re young, and with two small children. We want to stay in Arkansas and we own a business in Arkansas.”

Boccher said her family “checked all the boxes” for what Steele and Penn wanted to present as the ideal family the state was trying to attract.

Penn asked Boccher to testify before the state house and senate committees.

As a result of her hard work and commitment to the legislation, Boccher and her family were invited to the bill signing ceremony earlier this month.

On February 7, Hutchinson released a statement that read, in part, “…beginning in January [Arkansas] will also exempt military retirement pay. This initiative will make Arkansas a more military friendly retirement destination and will encourage veterans to start their second careers or open a business right here in the Natural State.”

For her part, Boccher is proud of what she’s accomplished for veterans while simultaneously running an apparel company, a photography company, and a non-profit organization, the Down Syndrome Advancement Coalition.

Additionally, Boccher is the president of the Little Rock Air Force Base Spouses’ Club and the 2016 and 2017 Little Rock Air Force Base Spouse of the Year.

Boccher had this to say about her work, “The military community is resilient, adaptable, dedicated, independent, supportive, and resourceful, but most of all they can make a difference, their voice can be heard, and they can and will make change happen!”

Military Life

Here is what you need to know about being a Recon Marine

NavaTheBeast is an active duty Marine and fitness trainer. In this fifteen-minute video, we get a glimpse into the life of a Recon Marine through his interview with one.


The questions primarily focus on how to become a Recon Marine. Among the suggested exercises were running and swimming, where the Recon Marine explained how the officer who became his platoon commander thought he was in good shape, but was in last place.

Before the interview, though, it focuses on some of the highlights of being a Recon Marine. Potential trainees are in a pool (about 15-20 feet deep), wearing swimming trunks, with their hands and feet bound, and bouncing off the bottom of this pool to get air. Some more interesting aspects, including an underwater insertion, as well as a CH-53E Super Stallion, weapons training, and the start of a parachute insertion, are also shown.

The consequences for quitting training to be a Recon Marine are also outlined. Watch the video — and learn what the real secret is to becoming a Recon Marine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JIdMadG878

NavaTheBeast/YouTube

Military Life

6 reasons why coffee is the lifeblood of the military

Very few things truly connect every troop from every era in the military quite like a cup of coffee. From the gritty First Sergeant who drinks it black to the fresh Lieutenant who likes a bit of coffee with their sugar, everybody’s veins in the military are filled with coffee.


Coffee has been a staple of the American military ever since the first Revolutionary patriot signed up to throw the tea into Boston Harbor — fueled entirely for their hatred of tea. Our love of java necessitated the creation of instant coffee in the Civil War, and we’ve been drinking it ever since.

Related: A brief history of coffee in the US military

Here are 6 reasons why coffee truly is the lifeblood of the military.

6. Everyone meets at the coffee pot

Coffee is the great equalizer. Everyone, from privates to colonels, meets to grab their morning (or afternoon, or evening) cup of Joe.

When the pot is finished, refilling it is one of the few tasks that isn’t assigned to the lowest ranks, but rather to whoever drank the last cup.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
The trick is to always leave at least one cup and wait until someone else springs the trap. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alexander P. Akre)

5. We get very little sleep

To the surprise of absolutely no one, troops rarely get eight hours of sleep.

The higher the rank of a troop, the less they’re allowed to show sleepiness. Coffee helps mask that exhaustion.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Coffee. For when it’s too early to soldier. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Ken Scar)

4. Something warm in the field is nice

In combat arms units especially, you’re seen as weak if you can’t endure the elements.

Grab another layer of clothes? Weakness. Throw on a fleece jacket? Weakness. Grab a warm cup of coffee? Carry on, soldier.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
So good you’ll forget you’re freezing your ass off. (Photo by Lt. Col. John Hall)

3. It’s a reminder of back home

There isn’t much time, space, or ability to pine for life back home.

Troops take great care when they prepare a pot of coffee. They can skimp on many necessities of life but will always spend the big bucks to get the “good stuff” from their civilian life.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Did you know that, statistically speaking, instant coffee is one of the most requested care-package items from troops? (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Justyn M. Freeman)

2. It’s a little break from reality

The military is a very high-speed piece of machinery. You’ll run from point A to point B, over to C, back to B, asked why you aren’t at D, and get there only to realize everyone is at C — and so on until your brain is fried.

At least for those brief moments, when you’re drinking a cup of coffee, you can relax.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Command Sergeant Majors only smile when they’re watching privates get smoked or when they have a cup of coffee in their hands. (Photo by Army Master Sgt. Dave Thompson, 1st Sustainment Command (Theater) Public Affairs)

1. It just tastes good

There’re countless ways to stay warm, awake, and hydrated. Coffee isn’t the only option.

The fact of the matter is, we just love the taste — regardless of how we make it.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
A cup of Green Beans Coffee while deployed will always taste better than any stateside cup from chain coffee houses. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sandra Welch)

Articles

Feds sentence two who scammed Marines looking for love

Two people who ran a fraud scheme that took roughly $160,000 from active duty Marines were sentenced June 5 in federal court.


According to a release by the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina, Jones Tyler Martin and Hailey Tykoski carried out a “catfishing” scheme targeting Marines. Officials say the two persuaded Marines to hand over personal and financial information by posing as women interested in relationships.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
US Marines training with small arms. (US Navy photo)

According to an October 2016 release from the U.S. Attorney’s office, Tykoski was accused of impersonating the women in phone and online conversations, while Martin would use the information the pair acquired to obtain credit or make wire transfers.

The two were taken into custody after an investigation by the Navy Criminal Investigative Service’s Carolinas Field Office out of Camp Lejeune. The two were later indicted on charges of conspiring to commit wire fraud, wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, and aiding and abetting.

The Charlotte News and Observer reported that Martin and Tykoski used the social network MeetMe.com to lure the Marines in. Over a two-year period between 2013 and 2015, they hooked several Marines by convincing them they would be moving into to an off-base apartment.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Cyberspace recently proved dangerous to some Marines’ wallets. (DOD photo)

On Jan. 30, Martin pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and aggravated identity theft, and on March 27 Tykoski pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Martin was sentenced to 57 months in prison and five years of supervised release while Tykoski was given five years of probation.

Both were also ordered to make restitution. Martin was ordered to pay $117,306.42m while Tykoski was ordered to pay $42,289.05.

“The U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Attorney’s Office in this district treat cases such as this one with high priority,” U.S. Attorney John Stuart Bruce said in the release. “There will continue to be vigorous prosecution of those who commit fraud and cybercrimes targeting members of the armed services and veterans.”

H. Andrew Goodridge, the NCIS Special Agent in Charge of the Carolinas Field Office, added, “This case reminds all of us to remain vigilant about what information we provide to strangers, it also demonstrates that NCIS is committed to pursuing those who exploit US service members.”

Lists

10 gifts for the man in your life who’s operator AF


6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit

My Marine husband is the worst to shop for.

The worst, I tell you.

The man sees something he wants and he hauls off and buys it. It makes Christmas shopping extremely difficult.

So in an effort to put together a good Christmas list I asked him to consult with me on an article for WATM’s “10 gifts for the man in your life who’s operator AF.”

This is what he sent me:

1. Operator Stocking

This stocking is definitely operator AF.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
High Speed Operator Stocking / Accessory Pouch

Specs:

  • Double Zipper Main Pocket
  • Santa Clause Approved & Compatible.
  • Modular Webbing for Pouch Attachment
  • 3x Polymer D-Rings
  • Integrated Drag / Carry Handle
  • 2x Hanging Hooks
  • External Small Pouch with Elastic Cord Closure
  • 3″x2″ Patch Panel
  • Made from High Durability Nylon Fabric

2. Hidden gun rack

No one will ever catch him by surprise as he’s flexing in this mirror.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
N.J. Concealment Furniture surface mounted wall mirror

Specs:

  • 16″x52″x3.75″ inside 12″ x48″ 2 3/4″
  • Construction:
  • Solid hardwood with hardwood plywood back.
  • Includes:
  • 2 1/4″ Kaizen foam
  • mounting hardware
  • Includes magnetic lock and one magnetic key.

3. Plate carrier

…Because every operator should wear this every time he leaves the house.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Plate Carrier With Cummerbund Molle Style

Specs:

  • tab “panes”
  • External cummerbund that offers a more stable MOLLE platform
  • Cummerbund is fully adjustable and removable
  • Small/Medium has three rows of MOLLE webbing
  • Large/ X-Large has four rows of MOLLE webbing
  • Carrier is not releasable
  • Armor not provided

4. SureFire weapons light

…For seeing under the couch and shit.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Surefire X300U-A 600 Lumen LED WeaponLight Rail Lock

Specs:

  • Virtually indestructible LED regulated to maximize output and runtime
  • Tactical-level output with TIR lens for close- to longer-range applications
  • Quick-detach rail clamp
  • Accepts optional pistol grip and long gun forend switches
  • Weatherproof—O-ring and gasket sealed
  • Construction—High-strength aerospace aluminum with Mil-Spec anodizing; impact-resistant polymer; coated tempered window
  • Includes high-energy 123A batteries with 10-year shelf life

5. A sweet 1911 handgun

Because every SureFire needs a firearm attached (..and because this is MARSOC AF!).

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
M45A1 Close Quarter Battle Pistol

Specs:

  • M1070CQBP SPECIFICATIONS
  • CALIBER .45 ACP
  • WEIGHT 2.8lbs (1.27 kg)
  • CAPACITY 7+1 Wilson Magazine
  • OVERALL LENGTH 8.5in (21.59cm)
  • BARREL LENGTH 5in (12.7cm)
  • FIRING ACTION Single Action
  • FIRING SYSTEM Series 80

6. JetBoil stove

Because even operators need their coffee.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Jetboil Flash Cooking System

Specs:

  • Best Use Backpacking
  • Fuel Type Canister
  • Fuel Isobutane-propane
  • Auto Ignition Yes
  • Integrated Pot Yes
  • Burn Time (Max Flame) 100g canister: 42 minutes
  • Average Boil Time 4 min. 30 sec.
  • Dimensions 7.1 x 4.5 x 4.1 inches
  • Liquid Capacity (L) 1 liter
  • Liquid Capacity (fl. oz.) 33.8 fluid ounces
  • Weight 15.25 ounces

7. Kevlar helmet

Holidays are coming. So are the in-laws. Enough said.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
3M Combat High Cut Helmet with Rails and NVG Shroud

Specs:

  • Meets or exceeds NIJ Level IIIA ballistic standard for penetration
  • Meets a minimum of 650 mps V-50 for 17 grain tested according to STANAG 2920
  • Shell sizes: S-XL
  • Variable thickness, 7 impact absorbing pads can be adjusted or removed for individual comfort
  • Pad thickness sizes: standard size 6 @ 3/4″ or optimal size 8 @ 1″
  • Weight: starting at 2.4 lbs (small)
  • Includes: Wilcox NVG mount and side accessory rails

8. Hammock

Sometimes an operator just needs to hang shit in the back yard and sleep there.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
OneLink Sleep System – JungleNest

Specs:

  • JungleNest Hammock
  • Your Choice of Atlas or Helios Straps
  • Your Choice of Rain Tarp
  • Set of Carabiners Included
  • Set of Stakes Included

9. Combat boots

For stomping on all those battery operated toys his mother-in-law is going to send the kids this year.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Nike Special Field Men’s Boot

Specs:

  • Quick-drying synthetic leather overlays for durability and support
  • Multiple ventilation zones that allow the boot to breathe and drain quickly
  • Genuine leather footbed for durability, flexibility and comfort
  • Nike Free-inspired outsole, designed for traction and natural range of motion
  • Sticky rubber forefoot lugs for exceptional traction on all terrain
  • Weight: 15.9 ounces (men’s size 9)

10. Backpacking stove

For when the holidays get to be too much and he takes his SureFire, JungleNest and JetBoil out to the woods for a few days. He’ll need to cook.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
MSR WhisperLite Universal Backpacking Stove

Specs:

  • Best Use Backpacking
  • Fuel Type Canister, Liquid
  • Fuel Auto, Isobutane-propane, White Gas, Kerosene
  • Burn Time (Max Flame) (20 oz.white gas) 1 hr. 50 min. / (8 oz. isobutane) 1 hr. 15 min.
  • Average Boil Time (White gas) 3 min. 30 sec. / (isobutane) 3 min. 45 sec.
  • Dimensions 6 x 6 x 4.75 inches
  • Weight (Stove, pump & canister mount) 13.7 ounces
Articles

Why the food in Guam is as funky and awesome as anywhere on the mainland

In a U.S. territory half a world removed from the continental United States, what does it mean to be American? To find out, Meals Ready To Eat host August Dannehl shipped off to the far reaches of Pacific Micronesia, to Guam.


6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
A sea of American flags in the heart of the Pacific. (Meals Ready To Eat screenshot)

Guam is a tiny island with a full dance card of seemingly competing cultural histories. Its indigenous people, the Chamorro, called it home for 4000 years, but after the island was “discovered” by Ferdinand Magellan in 1521, it experienced several centuries of European colonization, capture, and rule that heaped Spanish, Catholic, American, and Japanese cultural influence atop the foundations of its identity.

But where other territories with similar fraught histories stumble through the modern era in crisis and without a firm sense of collective “self,” Guamanians wove themselves into the fabric of democratic and multicultural America. They celebrate their 21st century hybridity with exuberance, with fervent patriotism and military service, and with a food culture so funky and delicious, people travel from all over the globe to get in on it.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Imagine this, but in a taco. With crab. And star fruit. (Meals Ready To Eat screenshot)

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Why choose? (Meals Ready To Eat screenshot)

In Guam, you find patriotism in its purest form, animated by gratitude for life. Guamanians have earned a deep understanding of how precarious human existence can be, whether it’s an island in the middle of the ocean or an oasis in the heart of the desert or a small, blue planet in the void of space.

Guamanians don’t just feel gratitude, they act on its behalf. As a people, they serve in the U.S. military at a higher rate than any of the 50 states.

When the Americans came and liberated us, they became family. That patriotism from our ancestors or those even living today, it continues on. And that’s an honor to be part of a nation that gives freedom, to be part of something greater than this tiny island…that’s what makes us American. —Sgt. Joleen Castro, U.S. Air Force

Their service reflects their dedication to the American ideal, yes, but it’s also an expression of inafa’maolek, or interdependence, the core value of the Chamorro people. Guamanians, at the deepest level of their tradition, celebrate collective prosperity, unity and togetherness. They celebrate the good.

6 types of Commo guys you’ll meet in your first unit
Unsurprisingly, they throw incredible parties. (Meals Ready To Eat screenshot)

Watch more Meals Ready To Eat:

Army food will make you feel the feels

This whiskey is a WWII victory, distilled

This is what happens when you run your kitchen like a platoon

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