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Vet goes from sailor to singer/songwriter


Logan Vath left the Navy in 2012 to be pursue a career as a singer/songwriter. Crowdfunding his first album, Logan started to find success, playing wherever he could, building relationships in the music industry, and keeping up with old friends.

Vath has a unique take on his experience thus far: "I visited a recruiter's office, and, what happened to me usually happens to most people who visit a recruiter's office — I joined the Navy," Vath laughed. "On my 2nd deployment, on the USS Monterey, I was actually performing weekly when the ship would pull in. We were doing 'Show Your Colors' tours on the boat and the Captain, Captain Jim Kilby, had me playing in the corner, in my dress uniform during receptions. I was lucky, everyone I've ever encountered in the military was always really supportive of my music. I think they all knew that this was what I was going to do at some point, or try to do at the very least."

He says that what he learned in the Navy wasn't always directly related to the skill set he maintained in order to perform his duties. "Playing to a crowd of people can teach you a lot about how to win over an audience if the subject matter isn't something that is totally interesting to them," he said. "Still to this day I use a lot of humor in shows in between songs just to keep people involved — to let them know that I'm not that sad of a person actually. The music can be, but I think performing on the ships is something that helped build my style."

As he frequently laid topside, looking up at the stars, Vath admits that his lyrics frequently reference his own experience.  "I think lyrically, things still sneak in from being out there and spending so many nights staring at the stars," he said. "I think it's extremely easy to romanticize the ocean and even songwriters that weren't in the Navy do it frequently. I've never written specifically about things that have happened, but I would say there are definitely some themes from my experience."

However, not every part of his career was a cakewalk. At one point, Vath let on that the ship he was stationed on, the USS Nassau, suffered from a fuel leak and simultaneous air-conditioning snafu off the coast of Africa. "I lived off of powered milk and Red Bull for a while even though they said the water was good," Vath recounted. "Something in my body would not allow me to drink water that tasted like fuel for some reason, I don't know why [laughing]. But that lasted a while; that was horrible. I just remember so many horrible, horrible sweaty nights in those racks with no A/C, just in a giant, baking tin-cup."

Setting out to get out of Nebraska and make his own way, Vath remembers the day he chose what he would do in the Navy. "When I was at the recruiter, they gave me four jobs," he said. "What prompted my choice of AG, (Aerographer's Mate), was the recruiter saying, 'This never comes up; you gotta do this job. You'll love it.' So, I signed up and said I'd do it — and he was correct. We had such a small community. The beautiful thing about being an AG, was that when you went out to a boat, nobody really knew what you did, so you can fly under the radar often. You have a lot of things that you have to take care of, but it's a very isolated, quiet job."

Vath says the turning point in his life started in boot camp. "The most important part was being cut off from everything," he said. "That shaped me for so much about life. I always think about that, the most scared I ever was, was surrendering that cell phone after the first call because I had gone from a life of complete connection to nothing. I didn't have anybody, I didn't know anybody yet. And I think that that's really good for people to be put in those situations because so many people aren't. It's terrifying to be a situation with no way out. You learn a lot about yourself in that."

Admitting that maybe his expectations weren't completely accurate when imagining who he would be as a result of his service, Vath says he thought the Navy was going to be a cure-all. "I thought I was going to become cleaner, faster, more efficient and abandon all my old habits," he admitted. "That didn't really happen. What I liked about the Navy, and everyone says you get what you put into it, and that's so true. If you do it correctly, the Navy allows you to take whatever personality traits you have that are strong and utilize them in a lot of different ways."

He discovered not only himself, but a new perspective on the world around him as he experience what life in the Navy entails. Says Vath, "I think everything I thought I would get out of the military, I got. It taught me that things can be a lot worse sometimes, things can be a lot better, you don't always get to do what you want, sometimes you just have to do things that are completely against the way you would do them just because it's just the way it is. Which I think is a really good skill to have and that people don't often have it. I anticipated it would make me a harder worker — it did. I anticipated it would make me not take home or family for granted — it did, which is huge for me. I anticipated I would make great friends and see the world — I did. And I anticipated that after four years, I would come out a more rounded individual with better critical thinking and life experience and I did. I am in debt to it for that, as an organization because it gave me a lot of opportunities."

Reminiscing on his first experiences, Vath admits that the part of his service that he misses the most is the 'firsts' of everything. "When you hop on your first boat, I remember that feeling of just being overwhelmed; going out to sea for the first time," he said. "And there's so many things you get to do like that in the Navy such as the first time you take off from a flight deck. You'll never get that first feeling back, and so many first feelings that you're given the opportunity to feel. I miss that a lot. I have goosebumps right now, thinking about coming home on the USS Nassau for the first time and playing 'City of New Orleans' by Arlo Guthrie while coming in, getting ready to dock." He began signing,"'Good Morning America, How are you?'" He paused for a moment and took a deep breath, "Beautiful song — I'll always associate that song with that feeling. And you can never get that back."

Once known for a satirical song entitled 'The Fraternization Song', Logan chose to remove the tune from the public eye after receiving a lot of publicity for the song's comedic twist on enlisted-officer relationships in the Navy. Says Vath, "It was kind of a spur of the moment thing. I was playing a show in Charlottesville, VA and there was a big media writeup in Charlottesville and a lot of it focused on the song. I didn't want to use the military as a novelty. I'm happy to be a veteran and I had such a good time in the Navy, it was nothing but good to me. I have nothing but good things to day about it and I didn't want to use that in the music. Any fans I gained, I wanted to gain organically. I wanted to earn their respect instead of them listening to be because I was a sailor."

Logan has recently been working with a record label in Brooklyn, NY to record his next album. Vath declines to pigeonhole his music into a genre, choosing instead to focus on its substance. "I sing about personal experience but not in a storytelling way," he said. "It's more drawing parallels of everyday things and trying to view them differently. Putting myself in a genre is hard. People who do what I do usually say Indie Folk, but I'm not sure that that's where I am." He takes a sip of his beer and looks up, "Being able to hold a room of 50 people for an hour to an hour and a half and they are genuinely interested in what you're saying is an incredible feeling. Of course the next time you're in town, hopefully that number is 75, and eventually you're moving into a venue that can fit 100. It's a cool progression to watch. The trend is, for me, that if there is good music, people are going to listen to it; regardless of genre. Good music is good music."

Brittany Slay is the Editor of American Veteran Magazine and a US Navy veteran, completing a 9 month deployment to Bahrain in 2014. She's a fan of dark humor and enjoys writing, visiting breweries, and meeting people.

 

 

For more information on Logan Vath, please visit loganvath.bandcamp.com.

And check out American Veteran Magazine at amvets.magloft.com.

Now: This Army veteran uses powerful images to show the realities of war >

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