MIGHTY MOVIES

This is what happened when a newspaper called John Wayne a 'fraud'

When it comes to talking politics, be like The Duke.

John Wayne never was able to join the military — when the draft first started in 1939, the then-unknown actor had a 3-A deferment because he was the sole supporter of four children — but that didn't stop him from hopping in an armored personnel carrier and mounting an invasion with the 5th Armored Cavalry Troop. He had a cigar clenched in his teeth.

He was about to lead the U.S. Army in an invasion of Harvard University.


In January, 1974, the Duke invaded Harvard Square with some of the Army's finest in response to a letter he received from the campus satirical newspaper, The Harvard Lampoon. In the letter, the paper said,

"You're not so tough, the halls of academia may not be the halls of Montezuma and maybe ivy doesn't smell like sagebrush, but we know a thing or two about guts."

The paper then challenged the conservative Wayne to come to Harvard, a place The Harvard Lampoon described as, "the most intellectual, the most traditionally radical, in short, the most hostile territory on Earth." They were challenging the actor to come to Harvard and debate against the students who called him, "the biggest fraud in history."

Wayne accepted.

The letter was purely goading, but John Wayne wasn't about to let that bother him — he took the opportunity to visit in style.

He mounted the procession from the halls of The Harvard Lampoon's on-campus castle, then drove to the door of the Harvard Square Theater through policemen, television crews, 'Poonies dressed in tuxedos, students, and even some Native American protesters. There was even a marching band in his honor. In the heart of liberal Harvard, the conservative actor was met by thousands of admirers.

After signing autographs for a while, he took the stage. The first thing representatives of The Harvard Lampoon did was present Wayne with a trophy — made of just two brass balls. It was created just for him and awarded simply for coming to Harvard.

"I accepted this invitation over a wonderful invitation to be at a Jane Fonda rally," he joked.

The Duke graciously accepted the award, noting that their previous guest was porn starlet Linda Lovelace and that seeing his invitation in a unmarked brown envelope was akin to being asked to lunch with the Borgias, a reference to the historical family's propensity for murdering their guests.

With the pleasantries out of the way, Harvard's debate with John Wayne, a spokesman for the right, began. Taking questions from the audience, the Duke sat on a chair on the stage. The New York Times described the debate as one with "little antagonism, the questions often whimsical and the actor frequently drew loud applause."

John Wayne was a conservative in his political views, but he answered the students' questions thoughtfully and honestly, often with a wry smile. Asked what he thinks of women's lib, he said:

"I think they have a right to work anywhere they want to [long pause] as long as they have dinner ready when we want it."

The only question he seemed to rebuff was one asked about his testifying against fellow Hollywood personalities during the Communist witch hunts of the 1950s, which led to some being placed on the infamous Hollywood blacklist. The actor said he could not hear the question, even when it was repeated.

"Is your toupee made of mole hair?" One student asked. "No," the Duke replied. "That's real hair. It's not my hair, but it's real hair."

Today, John Wayne and Harvard doesn't seem like a controversial mixture. In 1974, however, the students at Harvard were very much anti-establishment and John Wayne was a symbol of everything they mistrusted about their country, its history, and its government — especially while the Vietnam War and the draft remained a very recent memory.

By 1974, Wayne's career was threatened by his well-known politics, so it's not really an exaggeration to say the actor was on his way into hostile territory. The Lampoon ended up doing what amounted to a celebrity roast with Wayne and he took it with a smile, even adding some funny jabs of his own:

"Has President Nixon ever given you any suggestions for your movies?" a student asked. "No, they've all been successful," came the reply.

John Wayne never lost his sense of humor over politics — a lesson we should all take to heart today, liberal and conservative alike. What could have been a moment of sharp political divisiveness was settled with good humor and in the end, thunderous applause.

Watch: How Joseph Stalin tried to kill John Wayne