Marines do some pretty spectacular and/or ridiculous things while deployed. Anyone who follows Terminal Lance on Instagram can tell you that much. What Marine Warrant Officer Faustin Wirkus did was pretty spectacular, but really it was just a day in the life of a U.S. Marine. Except this time, the Marine in question ended up being proclaimed king of the island in a voodoo ceremony — and he ended up with a wife, whether he wanted to or not.


The Status of Forces Agreement is about to get *super* interesting.

At this point, half of everyone is wondering what happened and the other half is wondering if voodoo is why you so rarely see the warrant officers in your unit. Well, It was why then-Sergeant Wirkus had to stop showing up for duty. It wasn't that Wirkus was opposed to hard work — he was a United States Marine after all, and he grew up breaking coal from slate in the Pennsylvania Coal Country.

But, Wirkus, he had an island to rule.

Best. Additional Duty. Ever.

Wirkus arrived in Haiti in 1915 with his fellow Marines. He spent much of his first year around the capital of Port-Au-Prince. Germany had been intervening in a number of Caribbean insurrections. The Haitians suddenly overthrew the American-backed dictator on the island, and Caco Rebels installed an anti-American president.

The Marines were sent in to occupy and stabilize the island while enforcing the American "Monroe Doctrine" — an intolerance toward European meddling in the Western Hemisphere. They were also protecting U.S. economic interests. Wirkus was one of many Marines sent to Haiti aboard the USS Tennessee. It was aboard that ship he first saw the island of La Gonâve.

I totally understand the appeal.

He asked a Marine NCO about the island. The reply was cryptic and short.

"If you're lucky, you'll never get any closer to that place than you are now. No white man has set foot on it since the days of the buccaneers. There's a post on it now, but the men stationed there don't usually come back — and if they do, they're fit for nothing but the bug house… Place is full of voodoos and God knows what else."

Luckily, he was kept in the capital during his first deployment in Haiti. He soon fell from a truck and broke his arm. After his recovery in the U.S., he was sent to Cuba, and eventually back to Haiti. It was four years later and the young Marine was now a Sergeant, but was a commissioned officer in the local Garde d'Haiti, keeping the Caco Rebels at bay in the outer edges of the island nation.

U.S. Marines in the occupation of Haiti.

He was good at it, and so, of course, he would eventually be sent to the one place everyone told him he would be lucky to never see. No, it was not Twentynine Palms, it was the mysterious island the NCO warned him about: La Gonâve.

Wirkus was extremely interested in the island. It captivated him but none of the other Marines could tell him anything about the island's interior; none of them had ever dared to venture inland. His first assignment on the island was to assess prisoners of the Garde who were charged with "offenses against the Republic of Haiti" and "trivial voodoo offenses."

Among them was a woman named Ti Memenne, who warned the Marine that she would see him again. Still, Wirkus sent her on to Port-Au-Prince with a recommendation for lenient treatment.

Faustin I was reincarnated as Faustin II.

"They made me a sort of king in a ceremony I thought was just a celebration of some kind. I learned later they thought I was the reincarnation of a former king of the island who had taken the name of Faustin I when he came into power. The coincidence was just good luck for me."

Faustin II's good luck was good luck for the locals. The 19-year U.S. occupation of Haiti did not go as smoothly or nonviolently for the rest of the country. But that good luck ran afoul of the President of Haiti, who was able to visit the island for the first time in 1928. Incidentally, he was able to visit without being murdered by the island's inhabitants, thanks to the command decisions of Faustin Wirkus. The President was not thrilled with the King and requested he be transferred to the mainland United States.

Emperor Faustin II. Or Sergeant Fustin Wirkus. Again, depending on your belief in voodoo.

He went willingly in 1929 and left the Corps shortly after. He returned to active duty in the days before World War II and was made a Warrant Officer who served in the Navy's pre-flight school in North Carolina. He died just months before the end of World War II and was interred in Arlington National Cemetery,