MIGHTY HISTORY

This real soldier's photo is still hanging at Checkpoint Charlie

It's been almost 30 years since the infamous Checkpoint Charlie, the primary crossing post between East and West Berlin, was taken down with the fall of the Berlin Wall. The original guardhouse was little more than a temporary shack for much of its life and has since been replaced. As the area in Berlin began to grow and become a tourist attraction, more and more Cold War-era sights were added to the checkpoint.

One of those sights is a photo of a real American soldier, looking East.


These days, the area in Berlin that saw some of the most intense showdowns between East and West is full of tourists and Berlin residents who probably wish they had taken a different route to work. For three Euro, you can take a photo with one of the soldier-reenactors who dress up to man the post. If you're hungry, there's a McDonald's across the street. It's very much not the Checkpoint Charlie of old, but still worth a visit. For military veterans approaching the once-legendary area, there might be a different question – who is that guy in the photo?

The "soldiers" holding the U.S. flag and posing for tourists were never troops, that's just fun for the onlookers. But staring at the photo of the American soldier posted at the guardhouse, it's clear that he's wearing a real U.S. Army uniform.

His name is Jeff Harper.

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the checkpoint's rise as a prime tourist attraction in the German capital, the photos of Sgt. Harper and his Soviet counterpart on the other side have become as synonymous with the checkpoint as anything else in Cold War lore. But Harper wasn't exactly the stereotypical Cold Warrior. He was a U.S. Army tuba player with the 298th Army Band in Berlin from 89-94 and never pulled guard duty at the checkpoint. He was just 22 when the photo was taken.

In an interview with the German publication Der Tronkland, Harper said he almost dropped his coffee when he first saw his face up on the sign. That was 1999.

"I am very proud to have become part of the story to this extent and still be part of what is happening in Berlin today," Harper said. "I can hardly imagine in how many photo albums I have been immortalized."

Harper has since retired from the Army, but he was still in Berlin for the fall of the wall.

Jeff Harper after his retirement in 2010.

The most important thing to know about the photos is that they're not part of any authentic recreation of the site. They're an art exhibit, called Ohne Titel – or "Light Boxes." The photo was taken by Berlin photographer Frank Thiel in 1994, as an attempt to capture photos of the last Allied soldiers in the city. The young Russian troop isn't wearing a Soviet military uniform, he's wearing a 1994 uniform of the Russian Federation.

"... These portraits translate the omnipresent sector signs of the past – "You are leaving the American/British/French sector" – into picture form. They are likewise a reference to the historical moment when Soviet and American tanks faced off against each other right here," said Thiel. "By using two portraits to symbolize almost 50 years of history, I am suggesting that these two faces are representative."

These days, Harper is enjoying the retired life driving his motorcycle around the highways of the American West. He says the highlight of his career in Berlin was being able to play in the band for President Bill Clinton. As for the Russian soldier on the opposite side, no one really knows who he is or where he ended up.