Lists

The 10 coolest jobs for military spouses


Staff Sgt. John Carlin walks off the flightline with his family May 13, 2001, at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. Sergeant Carlin is assigned to the 61st Airlift Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Chris Willis)

If you're a military spouse, you know that finding employment in this nomadic lifestyle of ours is tricky to say the least. In fact, a 2014 study by Syracuse University's Institute for Veterans and Military Families and the Military Officers Association of America found that 90% of responding military spouses reported being underemployed.

Sure, data like that can be a bit of a bummer, but if you're a military spouse then you're basically a modern day MacGyver, a master of the back up plan and pretty darn good at getting creative. Military spouses also have a secret weapon: the milspouse network. For the most part, we want to see each other succeed (yeah, yeah I know some of you disagree) and are willing be supportive in many surprising ways.

It's not going to be easy or close to easy, but if a career is something you truly desire, it is entirely doable, even as a military spouse. Let this list be a jumping off point to get those creative juices flowing.

1. R. RiviterRemote Riveter

A company that specifically calls for military spouse contractors? Yes, please. This awesome business creates beautiful handbags and other products "the hard way" and uses military spouses in all aspects of the process. Your role is simply determined by your skill level and what you have to offer.

2. Animal Groomer 

If you're into fluffy things, then this is the career for you. Although, I am told that things can sometimes get a bit…hairy. 

3. Furniture Refinisher

For the creatively minded who like rolling up their sleeves and giving old furniture a new lease on life, this might be just the thing. Don't know what I'm talking about? While she's not a milspouse, Jamie at Southern Revivals is a great example.

5. Personal Chef & Caterer

May's MilSpouse Issue featured one milspouse's unique take on catering and personal chef-ing. Located in Okinawa, Japan, The Set Table provides weekly meal kits and brings a service previously reserved for the well to do, to the masses. Talk about creative.

5. Virtual Bookkeeper & Accountant

Yes, number crunching is not usually a profession associated with the word "cool" per se, however, I think the term "virtual" really adds some excitement. More and more professions are becoming available for remote commutes on sites like AccountingDepartment.com.

6. Dog Sitter

Here's another opportunity to get some extra kisses and tail wags. You can use your own network to find clients or become a provider through a service like Rover.com.

7. Nanny or Baby Sitter

Moving on from fur babies to real babies, you can count on there being a need for quality childcare anywhere your family is stationed.

8. Hair Stylist

I've never met an uncool hair stylist. Cool must be a class they take. Or maybe it's the vibe you emit when you have the option to work from your own home, someone else's home, or a storefront.

9. Photographer

I was hesitant to add photography to the list because it is often mistaken to be easier than it looks, which means that the market is frequently oversaturated. That said, if you have an eye for truly quality photos (using something other than your iPhone), you could stand out from the pack and provide a truly valued service.

10. Personal Trainer

If you're good at motivation and have a hankering for health, then you might just be perfect for this line of work. Tasks aren't limited to one-on-one sessions; there are opportunities for a variety of group classes that you can offer privately or even through your base fitness center.

Read more money tips and personal finance wisdom from Lauren at MilitaryPlanners.com.

For help making your resume something worth looking at, click here!

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This article originally appeared at Military Spouse Copyright 2015. Follow Military Spouse on Twitter.

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