7 of the most overused lines in war movies - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

An essential part of filmmaking is acknowledging the audience’s familiarity with the subject matter and the themes common to the genre. Unfortunately for screenwriters, dialogue that may have once been clever and poignant becomes cliche and induces eye-rolling laughter when we hear the same lines repeated ad nauseam from one movie to the next.


Avoid these war-movie tropes.

Related: 7 ways ‘Starship Troopers’ is the most outstanding moto film ever

1. “We’ve got company!”

Well, yeah, no sh*t. We’re fighting a war. Plus, the word “company” evokes the same feelings as the arrival of a house guest. Try something like, “We’ve got opposing forces! Ahhhh!” I’m just spit-balling here.

 

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

(Warner Brothers’ Dunkirk)

2. “You just don’t get it, do you?”

This line typically precedes some terribly narrated flashback or montage.

It’s an excuse for one character to plainly explain to movie-goers what they already know because the studio doesn’t respect the intelligence of its audience. When you hear this line, brace yourself while some secondary character inanely spews out backstory.

 

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
(Warner Brothers’ American Sniper)

 

3. Some variation of, “We can do this the easy way — or the hard way.”

This one happens a lot… but I’ll admit it is a little fun watching various directors reimagine this trope.

 

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
(Orion Pictures’ Platoon)

4. “You look like sh*t.”

What? Yeah, well, maybe you look like sh*t, too!

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

(Sony Pictures’ Black Hawk Down)

5. “Is that all you’ve got?”

The character who drops this line almost always immediately dies or watches the opposing force bust out their biggest gun. It’s like a curse.

6. “I got a bad feeling about this.”

Do you really? Was there something unsettling about the fact that you’re about to go to shoot at guys who are shooting at you?

 

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
(Lionsgate Films’ Hacksaw Ridge)

 

Also Read: The top 5 armies of the future in cinema

7. “Don’t you die on me!”

Hahahaha… Ugh… You just know actors audibly sigh when they see this stinker in the script… again.

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘The Simpsons’ predicted this ‘Game of Thrones’ twist

The destruction of King’s Landing on the penultimate episode of Game of Thrones came as a shock to fans of the show who didn’t see Daenerys’s dark turn coming. It apparently wasn’t a shock to the people behind The Simpsons, as a two-year-old episode of the show seems to have predicted how Daenerys and Drogon would torch the city.

Soon after the episode ended, people on Twitter posted a clip from the season 29 premiere, “The Serfsons.” In the final scene of that episode, the family watches a dragon burn their village from atop the wall of a castle.


“Look the dragon is burning our village!” Bart says, and the show cuts to a long shot of the hovering dragon spitting fire down below. It’s a shot that looks just like one from “The Bells,” a shot of Drogon spitting fire on the people of King’s Landing. He is observed by Cersei in a tower in the Red Keep, a vantage point similar to the Simpsons’ that makes the shot composition eerily similar.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

(HBO)

This isn’t the first time The Simpsons has “predicted” something that later came true. The most famous example probably comes from “Bart to the Future,” a flash-forward episode from 2000 in which Lisa, the president of the United States, says “We inherited quite the budget crunch from President Trump.”

The show has also had a knack for predicting Super Bowls, with three different picks proving correct over the years.

A season 10 episode also showed the 20th Century Fox logo with “A Divison of Walt Disney Co” written underneath it. That one aired two full decades before Disney actually acquired Fox.

And while all of these predictions likely add up to a series of coincidences, we won’t exactly be surprised if the next week’s Thrones finale features a shyster coming into King’s Landing and convincing Cersei that building a monorail to Bravos is a good idea.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

What the movies get wrong about blacksmiths

It’s one of the coolest moments in medieval fantasy films. A blacksmith sweats over the forge, slowly pouring bright-orange, molten iron into an open-topped stone mold of a mighty sword while the audience watches a cool shot of the weapon taking shape.

Go ahead and toss in a shot of the warrior looking on with joy, let the audience watch as they quench the hot blade in snow, a person, or whatever, and presto, our hero has a neat toy for the next scene.

It’s too bad that this isn’t how any of it’s done in real life — and if it were, it’d be a sign of terrible craftsmanship.


7 of the most overused lines in war movies

The switch to iron and steel meant that they could make weapons longer without sacrificing durability. Which is important when you’re trying to stab someone without getting stabbed.

(Picture by J.J. Luder)

First, it should be stated that there’s a huge difference between casting a weapon and forging one. Back in the Bronze Age, before blacksmiths knew any better, they would take molten bronze and pour it into a stone cast to create a battle-ready weapon. This is casting.

Bronze was made from mixing copper and tin. For blacksmiths in 1200 BCE, this wasn’t a problem as both were abundant enough. Mankind had known about iron for hundreds of years at this point, but using it required a tremendous effort to create a product that was on par with bronze alternatives. When it was discovered that just a bit of carbon could turn the Earth’s most abundant metal into steel, they embraced the challenge.

Steel makes for stronger, more durable weapons, so blacksmiths began using this metal instead, but the process required was much different. To create something, smiths needed to forge it, starting from a blank (or piece of metal) that was the relative size of the weapon they intended to make, heating it, and painstakingly hammering it into shape.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
(Universal Pictures)

No matter how cool of an opening scene this is, it’s still kinda of wrong.

It’s not impossible to cast iron weapons — but the process will yield a cheap, crude weapon. This works for the Uruk-hai Orcs of The Lord of the Rings, but it’s just not practical for anyone else. This is also how most cheapo swords that medieval fans have on their walls are made. For decorative weaponry, that’s fine, but the blade would probably snap in half given just a bit of pressure.

When you pour the metal into the cast, it’s going to take shape of the mold. Which means that it’s only going to be half made when it’s done with an open-top cast. The other half of the sword will be flat when the metal hardens. If they were to rework the metal into a complete shape after that, it’d defeat the purpose of the mold all together.

If you want a durable weapon made out of anything but bronze and looks beautiful, you’re going to need to forge it. This process can take days — even just to get a standard-looking sword. You’re looking at weeks of master craftsmanship to get the caliber of weapons used by main characters.

Most films opt to go with the more cinematic approach. Bright-red liquid (fun side note: Molten iron heated to the point where it can be cast is actually more of a pale yellow. They’re using aluminum) looks cool when it takes form, but the actual process of making real weapons is far more impressive — even if it takes a lot longer than a montage.

To see how it’s done, check out the video below!

MIGHTY MOVIES

6 of the best Marine recruiting commercials ranked

Marine recruiters talk a good game to get prospects to sign on the dotted line, but words can only carry so much motivation. For some, it’s visual representation that can genuinely inspire a young adult to sign a contract and serve in the Corps.


Although posters are pretty cool, epic commercials that put adventure and self-righteousness on display are better.

Related: 6 ‘Toys for Tots’ commercials we swear didn’t make us cry

So, check out six of the best Marine recruiting commercials.

1. “Battles Won”

This commercial uses incredible voice-over and even cooler animation to cover the Corps’ rich, inspiring history.

(Marine OCS Blog | YouTube)

2. “Battle Up: 30”

One of the great recruiting commercials highlights the transformation of driven, young women into the ultimate Marine. Katy Perry may have intended to make her music video Part of Me feel like this motivating video, but she fell short.

(Marine Corps Recruiting | YouTube)

3. “241 Years of Battles Won”

If this video doesn’t get you to want to sign up, we don’t know what freakin’ will. The epic advertisement showcases how the Marine Corps embodies the saying, “the few and the proud.”

(Marine OCS Blog | YouTube)

4. “Rite of Passage”

Released in the late 1980s, this commercial showcases the Corps’ fighting spirit. The video symbolizes how troops will be trained to eliminate any threat that challenges their nation’s existence, even if that threat is a giant, flaming monster.

(echonow2001 | YouTube)

5. “The Climb”

Being a Marine means you’re going to face unbelievable mental and physical obstacles, but it’s how you overcome them that separates you from the rest of the population.

Marines pride themselves on finishing the mission using teamwork, and that’s what makes this commercial outstanding.

(Marine1763 | YouTube)

Also Read: This is why some Marines wear the ‘French Fourragere,’ and some don’t

6. “Knight”

Taking a page out of the Legend of King Arthur, the Marines’ 1987 commercial invokes medieval knights to tell young men that if they become a part of the Corps, they would be seen as one of the greatest warriors who ever lived.

Now, who wants to sign up?

(Marines | YouTube)Do you agree with our list? Comment below and rank these videos yourself!

MIGHTY MOVIES

How to forge your own blade like Rambo

In honor of the release of Rambo: Last Blood, Lionsgate invited me out to Adam’s Forge in Los Angeles SO THAT I COULD LITERALLY BEND STEEL TO MY VERY WILL. A group of us had the chance to forge knives out of railroad spikes, much like Sylvester Stallone does in the film.

It. Was. Awesome.

If you’ve never had the chance to do something like this, then my friend I beg of you, get thee to a forge. It’ll make you feel alive.


Rambo: Last Blood (2019 Movie) New Trailer— Sylvester Stallone

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Rambo: Last Blood Trailer

Almost four decades after he drew first blood, Sylvester Stallone is back as one of the greatest action heroes of all time, John Rambo. Now, Rambo must confront his past and unearth his ruthless combat skills to exact revenge in a final mission. A deadly journey of vengeance, RAMBO: LAST BLOOD marks the last chapter of the legendary series.

“A hammer can be used to build or destroy,” observed Aram, the artist in residence at Adam’s Forge — and our lead instructor for the day.

He started out with safety information (“Assume everything is hot. The forge can be up to 2200 degrees and the steel doesn’t have to be glowing to burn you…”) and then, without any delay, he was thrusting his spike in the fire.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

“I don’t want you to worry about how sexy it is until the end.” Well, I am worried about it, Aram. I want mine to be sexy.

Lionsgate Image

When the steel is at critical temperature, it’s ready to be shaped and forged with the hammer. Aram demonstrated this, making it look exceptionally easy, but as you might imagine, it’s actually pretty challenging. The metal cools rather quickly, so we had about enough time to strike 16-20 times in quick succession per side, rotating the blade every 8-10 strikes.

Then there’s the issue of hitting the target, which takes practice. I found at first that I was able to strike with force OR precision — but rarely with both. Eventually I began to get the hang of it, until I learned that I was twisting my blade.

Sharpen, straighten, pound, heat.

Aram and guest instructor Al were there to supervise and teach us about the science behind the blacksmith trade.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Lionsgate Image

I discovered that if my tongs were too deep in the forge, their metal began to expand, loosening the grip on my blade. A quick dip in a bucket of water helped cool them down enough to begin again.

Once we’d begun to sharpen and shape the blade, it was time to work the handle, twisting it in a vice and hammering it into a curve. Here we were able to make artistic choices, which stressed me out because, again, I wanted my blade to be sexy.

Once we were satisfied with the shape of our weapon, it was time to temper it.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Lionsgate Image

First we brought the blade to critical temperature, which we were able to test not just by visually seeing that the thing was glowing hot, but by the fact that it was demagnetized. Then we removed it from the forge and let it cool until the magnetic quality returned. The molecular alignment of the metal was literally changing during this process.

Then we brought the knife to critical temperature once more before quickly “quenching” it.

According to Aram, different cultures had different recipes to quench their metal, which rapidly hardens and cools it. We could safely handle the blade after less than a minute of quenching.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

From there it was time to sharpen the knife on the grindstone, shave off and smooth down excess steel, and then apply a light layer of WD-40 to prevent rust.

At the end of four hours, we’d each forged our own blade. It was seriously bad ass. I felt like Iron Man.

Tony Stark Builds Mark 1 – First Suit Up Scene – Iron Man (2008) – Movie CLIP HD

www.youtube.com

Here’s my biggest takeaway about blacksmithing: it’s got the meditative quality of crafting with your hands combined with the power that comes from working with weapons. If you like going to the gun range, grab some buddies and go forge your own freaking dagger. It’s just cool.

I’m excited to share this with other veterans because it’s been proven how therapeutic it is to work with your hands, to create. I wouldn’t exactly tell a macho guy to go take a painting class (although…maybe?) but I’d recommend this in a heartbeat.

It felt powerful. It was hot and challenging and violent and contained.

And then I walked away with a bitchin’ new blade to call my own.

HUGE SHOUTOUT to Lionsgate, who does so many cool events for veterans, for this opportunity. Don’t forget to check out Rambo: Last Blood, out on Digital and coming to 4K Ultra HD™ Combo Pack, Blu-ray™ Combo Pack, DVD on Dec. 17.

MIGHTY MOVIES

It’s Russian World War II tank propaganda, and it looks awesome

Yet another patriotic war movie has taken Russia by storm.

T-34, a high-octane tribute to the Soviet tank that played a key role on the Eastern Front of World War II, is the latest in a series of big-budget history flicks sponsored by the Culture Ministry and lavished with round-the-clock coverage on Russian state TV.

Spanning the years 1941-45, the film tells the story of Red Army Lieutenant Nikolai Ivushkin’s unlikely attempt to escape a German prisoner-of-war camp in a T-34 tank that he and three other men are tasked with repairing by their Nazi overseers. The fugitives are cornered in a German village near the Czechoslovak border, where an epic tank battle culminates the movie.


The slow-motion projectiles and video-game graphics give the movie a modern feel, and its simple storyline is thin on nuance. According to director Aleksei Sidorov, the aim of the film was to “tell the story of war in a way that appeals to the youth but doesn’t prove controversial among those who still keep the Great Patriotic War [World War II] in their memory,” the Culture Ministry quoted him as saying in a press release.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y_eRUErIlY
T-34 | Official HD Trailer (2018) | WORLD WAR II DRAMA | Film Threat Trailers

www.youtube.com

This time, a formula used in dozens of similar films appears to have finally struck gold. T-34 is the third Russian film devoted to World War II-era tanks since 2012 — but unlike its predecessors, 2012’s White Tiger and 2018’s Tanks, it’s proving a major hit with Russian audiences.

Since its nationwide release on Jan. 1, 2019, the movie has raked in more than a billion rubles, securing the top spot at the Russian box office. More than 4 million theatergoers have seen the film so far, according to stats from the Russian Cinema Fund.

Powerful backing played a role. The producer of T-34 is Len Blavatnik, a Ukrainian-born billionaire businessman with Kremlin ties. “For me, T-34 is more than a perfectly conceived adventure flick,” Blavatnik told reporters at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2017, where the film’s budget was estimated at 600 million rubles (currently million). “My grandfather was a World War II veteran, and that great victory is part of our family lore.”

Mostly politics-free

The war cost the lives of more than 26 million Soviet civilians and military personnel, and is held up as a point of national pride. The memory of the heroic Soviet campaign to oust the German invaders has often been used as fodder in propaganda, a fact noted by film critic Anton Dolin. But in a review for the independent news site Meduza, Dolin argues that T-34 avoids the primitive methods on display in other war movies sponsored by the Russian government.

“I thank the authors for creating a high-budget war blockbuster almost clear of propagandistic and ideological motives,” Dolin writes. “Even the word ‘Stalin’ is mentioned here only once, and in a facetious context. That’s a rarity in our times.”

White Tiger Official Trailer (2014) – Russian World War 2 Tank Movie HD

www.youtube.com

But T-34 is not completely free of references to contemporary geopolitics, it seems. In the tank battle that opens the movie, a cowardly Ukrainian soldier who gets mouthy with Ivushkin dies, while the tough Belarusian who obeys the lieutenant’s orders remains by the Russian’s side till the happy ending.

The film Tanks, which was released in 2018 and directed by Kim Druzhinin, can be seen as a prequel of sorts to T-34. It tells the story of two T-34 prototypes making their way from Kharkov to Moscow as the Nazi leadership looks for ways to destroy them and preempt the havoc they would soon wreak. The first audience for Tanks, according to Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, was servicemen at the Russian-run Khmeimim air base in Syria.

But while Tanks was widely panned by critics and proved a flop at the box office, T-34 has rolled over its competition. Perhaps it’s the lazy January holidays that bring Russians en masse before the screens.

“What could be merrier,” Dolin writes, than “crushing the fascist toad, and then chasing the victory down with mandarins and champagne?”

This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Follow @RFERL on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

‘Top Gun 2’ will fly the F/A-18 Super Hornet, not the F-35

The actor Tom Cruise on May 31, 2018, tweeted a teaser for the long-awaited sequel to the movie “Top Gun” — and in doing so, he wandered into one of the most heated debates in modern combat aviation and delivered a savage burn to the F-35.

The original “Top Gun” film was nothing short of a revelation for the US Navy. People around the US and the world saw fighter jets in a whole new light, and naval aviation recruitment shot up by 500%.

A new “Top Gun” movie, now 32 years after the first, could again spike interest in combat aviation at a time when the US military struggles to retain and attract top talent. But for the most expensive weapons system in history, it already looks like a bust.

Here’s the poster for the new “Top Gun.”


Notice anything? The F-35C, the US Navy’s long overdue, massively expensive new carrier aircraft, is nowhere to be seen. Instead, the F-18 Super Hornet, the F-35’s main competitor, can be seen.

The F-35 community was not thrilled.

“Everybody that’s flown a fighter in the last 25 years, we all watched ‘Top Gun,'” retired US Marine Corps Lt. Col. David Berke, who flew F-35s and actually attended the US Navy’s Top Gun school, previously told Business Insider.

“Damn shame,” Berke said in response to the new movie’s choice of fighter. “I guess it will be a movie about the past!”

While experts agree that the F-35’s carrier-based variant, the F-35C, and its vertical-takeoff sister, the F-35B, represent the future of naval aviation, they’re just not ready for the big time yet.

The F-35B had its first operational deployment in 2018 in the Pacific, but the F-35C remains a ways off from adoption onto the US Navy’s fleet of aircraft supercarriers. Persistent problems with launching the sophisticated airplane off a moving ship have pushed back the schedule and resulted in huge cost overruns.

Meanwhile, the F-18 Super Hornet continues to do the lion’s share of combat-aviation work aboard aircraft carriers, and its maker, Boeing, has even offered an updated version of the plane that President Donald Trump entertained buying instead of the F-35.

In short, it’s an embarrassment to the F-35 program that mounting setbacks have pushed it out of a potentially massive public-relations boost.

“It’s a capable aircraft,” retired Lt. Gen. David Deptula, the dean of the Mitchell Institute of Aerospace Studies, told Business Insider of the Super Hornet. “It’s just last century’s design.”

He added: “It is a missed opportunity.”

Berke pointed out that the producers of the new “Top Gun” may have gone with the Super Hornet over the F-35 because the Super Hornet has two seats, which could facilitate filming and possibly on-screen dynamics.

The popular aviation blog The Aviationist also pointed out that Cruise is holding an outdated helmet and that the photo does not appear to take place at the US Navy’s Top Gun school. But Hollywood sometimes makes mistakes.

“Hollywood doesn’t build movies around what makes sense — they build movies around what makes money,” Deptula said.

But despite what might have come as a slight sting to F-35 boosters hoping a new film could help usher in what they call a revolution in combat aviation, both Berke and Deptula said they were looking forward to the film.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

A surprise ‘Die Hard’ sequel gives 2020 a much-needed jump start

Whether or not you agree with the popular theory that the 1988 action picture “Die Hard” is really a Christmas movie, you’ll have to admit that NYPD detective John McClane is Bruce Willis’ greatest role.

There have been four sequels of varying quality over the past decades, but it had been seven years since Willis had played the part. That changed over the weekend when a new “Die Hard” movie showed up on YouTube.


DIEHARD IS BACK | 2:00 Film

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“Die Hard” 2020 is actually a commercial for DieHard, the iconic battery brand formerly owned by Sears and now sold by Advance Auto Parts. The spot brings back a pair of iconic characters from the original movie.

McClane’s car won’t start and he heads to an auto parts store for a new battery. He runs into the original movie’s computer hacker Theo (Clarence Gilyard Jr.), who’s still out for revenge 32 years later.

Theo sends a posse of musclebound thugs to finish off the detective, who crashes through the store window to buy his new battery. After escaping through the ventilation system, he runs into limousine driver Argyle (De’voreaux White), who’s finally paid off the same car he was driving in the first movie.

As they try to get back to McClane’s broken-down muscle car, Theo runs them down and crashes into the limo. The DieHard battery takes a bullet but still works when installed and they crank up the car for an escape.

Will Theo get his revenge or will McClane escape again with a few more scars but still in one piece? You’ll have to watch for the result.

If you’re shocked that Bruce was willing to play John McClane in a commercial, he’s got some thoughts for you.

“I’ve never done any sort of commercial with the John McClane character, but Advance Auto Parts brought an idea to integrate DieHard the battery into the ‘Die Hard’ story through a short film that’s authentic to McClane and both brands,” Willis said in a press release.

“Advance approached this like a motion picture — the script is clever, the production intense and the spot is entertaining,” he continued.” This is what ‘Die Hard’ fans expect. I think they will dig the DieHard –‘Die Hard’ mashup.”

Back in the day before its release, the movie title was a clever play on an iconic brand name. Over the years, the movie became a brand that’s probably bigger than the battery ever was. And now we’ve come full circle: A battery looks to get a boost from a movie that once got a boost from the battery.

Enjoy the spot and don’t get your back up. Bruce’s movie career got jump started by DieHard back in the day and now he’s returning the favor.

Here’s the classic DieHard battery commercial that the movie title was supposed to evoke for audiences back in 1988.

Diehard Battery Ad – Sears Roebuck Auto Center (1976)

www.youtube.com

This article originally appeared on Military.com. Follow @militarydotcom on Twitter.


Articles

This is what some of your fave sci-fi fighters would look like assigned to the US military

Think of the most famous starfighters of film and TV. You know them — The X-wing, the Y-wing, the VF-1 Valkyrie, the Colonial Viper, the F-302 — pop culture has gifted us with many famous planes we fly in our dreams… or on our personal computers and game consoles.


But if they existed for real, which squadrons would they be assigned to?

Here’s what We Are The Mighty is thinking:

Valkyrie from Robotech

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VF-84 “Jolly Rogers”

The cartoon Robotech gave us this variable-configuration multi-role aerospace fighter in its first season, which was based on the Japanese anime Super Dimension Fortress Macross. With the jet mode looking like an F-14 and the famous “Skull One,” the markings from VF-84, the “Jolly Rogers,” are really the only call you can make.

Colonial Viper from Battlestar Galactica (Either Series)

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VMFA-323 “Death Rattlers”

The Colonial Viper was an icon of whichever iteration of Battlestar Galactica you watched, whether it’s the classic one with Lorne Greene as Commander Adama and Dirk Benedict as the Starbuck, or whether it’s the new version with Edward James Olmos as Adama and Katie Sackoff as Starbuck. A number of squadrons have adopted nicknames based on snakes, but Marine Fighter Attack Squadron-323’s “Death Rattlers” seem particularly appropriate. The Vipers dominated their opponents when not caught by surprise or disabled by a cyber-attack – dealing death out far more than they received it.

Cylon Raider from Battlestar Galactica (Either Series)

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VFA-127 “Cylons”

Yes, this is an adversary unit. But there is no other squadron arsenal appropriate for the front-line fighter used by the villains of either version Battlestar Galactica.

Incom X-Wing Fighter from Star Wars

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VF-194 “Red Lightning”

“Red Five standing by.” Luke Skywalker’s call in the first Star Wars movie makes this designation a good one. Coincidentally, one of the planes flown by Navy Fighter Squadron-194, the F-8 Crusader, featured four 20mm cannon – while the X-wing has four lasers that proved to be capable of destroying TIE fighters easily.

Koensayr BTL Y-wing from Star Wars

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VA-128 “Golden Intruders”

Best known as the fighters flown by the ill-fated Gold Squadron in the first Star Wars movie, the Y-wing was intended as an attack plane – and in the first movie, the Y-wings were torn to bits by Darth Vader’s TIE fighters (with only one surviving the Battle of Yavin). So, Attack Squadron-128, which flew the A-6 Intruder, seems to be appropriate markings for this space fighter.

Gou’ald Death Glider from Stargate SG-1

sci-fi-fighters-gouald-death-glider-from-stargate-sg-1

Suggested Markings: 160th Fighter Squadron “Snakes”

This is another case where an easy call comes in. Gou’ald were called “snakes” by the heroes of Stargate SG-1. So, the 160th Fighter Squadron, Alabama Air National Guard — also called the “Snakes” — is really the only fitting mockup for this fighter.

Starfury from Babylon 5

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: 1st Fighter Squadron “Fighting Furies”

This was a space-superiority fighter designed to take on other fighters. The 1st Fighter Squadron flew the F-15C Eagle, the definitive “not a pound air-to-ground” fighter in Air Force service. Appropriately, the 1st Fighter Squadron was called the “Fighting Furies.”

Thunderfighter from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: 336th Fighter Squadron “Rocketeers”

At the start of the 1980s series Buck Rogers, the title character went into space on a rocket before things went south and he had 500 years in a deep freeze. Using the livery of the 336th Fighter Squadron makes a lot of sense, particularly since the F-15E is also a multi-role fighter that can be a capable dogfighter.

PWF-12 Peregrine Fighter from Deep Space Nine

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VF-96 “Fighting Falcons”

This fighter is another multi-role vessel, which could handle opposing fighters like the Romulan Scorpion or take on capital ships with proton torpedoes. With a decent war load, and a two-man crew, it seems reminiscent of the F-4 Phantom. Fighter Squadron-96 saw several tours during Vietnam, and was notable for producing the only Navy ace of that conflict. Their nickname also fits with this Starfleet fighter.

Sienar Fleet Systems TIE Advanced x1 from Star Wars

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Suggested Markings: VMF(AW)-114 “Death Dealers”

Darth Vader dealt death in this fighter in the first Star Wars movie, scoring six kills and becoming an ace in a day for the bad guys. This fighter was arguably able to take on the snub fighters of the Rebel Alliance in a one-on-one fight. This would make it a “Death Dealer” to any overconfident Rebel pilot.

Articles

This is how Stalingrad’s most epic sniper duel ended

Snipers are considered one of the most dangerous warfighters in the battlefield — taking out targets from concealed and undisclosed locations while homing in on prey that has no clue that they’re in the crosshairs.


During the Battle of Stalingrad, the massive damage the city suffered provided insufficient cover for ground troops, but it was perfect for sharpshooters who could hide in the crumbled buildings and wrack up kills.

Out of all the snipers that were most feared, none came close to Soviet Red Army sharpshooter Vasily Zaitsev.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
A German soldier during the battle of Stalingrad. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Related: This is the rifle Vasily Zaytsev used to wage a one-man war in ‘Enemy at the Gates’

Reportedly within 10 days of fighting in the streets of Stalingrad, Zaitsev’s body count reached about 40 kills. Once the Soviet press learned of the Siberian native’s incredible progress, they promoted it by releasing propaganda to anyone who would read it — even the Germans.

In response, the Germans sent their first-rate sniper, Maj. Erwin Konig into Stalingrad. Konig’s mission was to eliminate the Red Army’s most efficient marksmen and to display the Nazi’s superiority.

Word broke out that Konig was inbound after a German POW bragged to the Russian Army that it was only a matter of days before Zaitsev and the other snipers would be defeated. This news reached Zaitsev nearly immediately.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
Vasily Zaytsev and his trusty Mosin-Nagant sniper rifle.

Also Read: This is the German general who inspired a terrifying ‘Wonder Woman’ villain

After a few days, there were no signs of Konig being in the area until three Russian snipers were wiped out within a small section of town. With a hunter’s caution, Zaitsev worked his way into the area where Konig claimed the three Russians lives for an epic duel.

On the second day of Zaitsev’s stalk, a political commissar joined him to report the news of the kill after it had occurred. But the political commissar soon saw something move down the street, and as he stood up to point it out to Zaitsev, Konig killed him with a single well-placed shot.

This kill helped Zaitsev zero in on Konig’s hide. He removed his glove from his hand and placed it on a stick. He then raised the glove up, and Konig accurately shot it — exposing his muzzle flash.

Zaitsev quickly aimed and fired scoring a direct kill shot. The story’s finale isn’t exactly what audiences saw in 2001’s feature film “Enemy at the Gates” starring Jude Law.

Check out Gun Crazy 81’s video below to hear how this epic duel between these historic snipers went down.

Youtube, GunCrazy81

Articles

This is the rifle Vasily Zaytsev used to wage a one-man war in ‘Enemy at the Gates’

First used by the Russians in 1891, the Mosin-Nagant was modified from a standard service weapon to a sniper rifle in the 1930s. This five-shot, bolt-action rifle was a highly effective killing tool on the battlefield because of its sturdy construction and accuracy.


The Mosin-Nagant rifle typically weighs in at 8.8 pounds and has a muzzle velocity of nearly 3,000 feet per second — but the rifle is only as good as the man or woman who pulls its trigger.

During the Battle of Stalingrad, talented Russians snipers used the Mosin-Nagant PU version to wreak plenty of havoc against their Nazi adversaries. One of those talented sharpshooters was none other than the Soviet hero himself, Vasily Zaytsev.

Related: The 6 best Hollywood sniper shots ever

Zaytsev’s remarkable story was brought to life in 2001’s feature film “Enemy at the  Gates” starring Jude Law.  As a young boy, he learned his expert marksmanship skills while hunting game and tracking wolves near his home in desolate Siberia.

In 1937, Zaytsev was recruited into the Red Army, volunteered to be transferred to the front lines and waged a one-man war against the Nazis and reportedly killed 250 enemy troops with his Mosin-Nagant.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
The Hero of the Soviet Union Vasily Zaitsev (left)

Reportedly, Zaitsev was involved in a historical sniper duel with Maj. Konig, the former head of the German Army’s sniper school. During an afternoon of stalking one another, Zaitsev scored a righteous kill shot eliminating the German sniper from the war — using his famous Mosin-Nagant.

Roughly, 17 million Mosin–Nagant were produced during War World II, and its devastating 7.62 x 54R round is still used today in several Russian-made weapons.

Also Read: These 4 guns were used to make the longest sniper kills in history

Check out Lightning War 1941’s video to see this effective sniper rifle in action for yourself.

YouTube, LightningWar1941

MIGHTY MOVIES

You can own the helicopter from M*A*S*H

For those unfamiliar with it, M*A*S*H was a hit comedy-drama television series that aired on CBS from 1972 to 1983. Following a team of doctors and support staff from the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, the show takes place during the Korean War. During the war, the helicopter was a revolutionary platform that allowed for more rapid evacuation of wounded personnel from the battlefield. As such, the H-13 Sioux, known affectionately as the flying fishbowl, played a prominent role in the show. The Bell 47, the civilian model of the H-13, that was used most often in the show is now up for sale.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
(Platinum Fighter Sales)

Bell 47 D1 s/n 263 was built in July 1951 at the Bell Aircraft Assembly Plant in Niagara, New York. The helicopter was assigned to the U.S. Navy where it was used as a training platform. During its naval career, s/n 263 was once shipped from NAS Alameda, California to a Navy base in Japan and flown with floats installed. The helicopter was eventually shipped back to NAS Alameda and surplussed out of the Navy in 1958. It was purchased by the San Bernardino Valley Junior College Aeronautical Division for use as a training aid.

In 1972, the aircraft was put up for sale again. This time, she was purchased by Adrian Grieve, the owner and operator of Pathfinder Helicopters at Flabob Airport in Riverside, California. S/n 263 was completely disassembled and rebuilt to Bell Helicopters specifications. The next year, it received a Standard Airworthiness Certificate from the FAA as Bell 47 D1, N5167V.

Flyable once more, N5167V served as a student trainer, aerial photography platform, aerial surveyor, banner tower, and fruit frost control aircraft. However, the helicopter’s claim to fame is its starring role in M*A*S*H.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies
(Platinum Fighter Sales)

In the opening scenes of the show, two helicopters fly together in close formation; N5167V is the ship closest to the camera in the shot. In the second scene, N5167V is the second helicopter on approach to the landing pads. During the ten years of filming, the helicopter was used numerous times both as a set piece and in flying scenes. The helicopter’s last on-screen appearance was during the final departure scene of the show’s series finale, one of the most-watched TV episodes of all time.

In 1981, N5167V was sold to a South Dakota farmer who used the helicopter on his ranch for counting and herding cattle and crop dusting. N5167V was eventually sold to its current owner who restored it to original its M*A*S*H configuration. During over 5,800 flight hours, the helicopter never sustained any damage. Bell 47 D-1 s/n 263 N5167V is up for sale by Platinum Fighter Sales. The company specializes in warbird and classic aircraft brokerage. A poke around their website will reveal plenty of interesting aircraft for sale like a 1959 McDonnell F4H-1F Phantom II, a 1943 Curtiss Wright P-40N-1 Kittyhawk, and even a rare 1944 North American XP-82 Twin Mustang. The M*A*S*H helicopter has no price listed, but offers can be made online. Given the aircraft’s history, it’s expected to sell for a pretty penny.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Guy who perfected Marvel formula is about to get his mitts on Star Wars

If you’re someone who is worried about seeing great Star Wars movies after 2019, stop worrying. The dude who made all the awesome Marvel movies sing is suddenly crossing over to the Force. As of now, it’s official, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige will collaborate with Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy on at least one new Star Wars movie.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, a collaboration between Feige and Kennedy was written in the stars: “It made sense for these two extraordinary producers to work on a ‘Star Wars’ film together,” said a Disney studios rep. Right now, Kevin Feige is not taking over for Kennedy at all, but some people think this is a first step toward the Marvel boss becoming the Star Wars boss. Which, if you think Star Wars is kind of stalling lately, this might be great news.


Since 2015, the Star Wars comeback has been mixed. Everyone seemingly loved The Force Awakens and Rogue One, but these days, you gotta be careful if you randomly want to chat about The Last Jedi or Solo over casual beers. As far as universal love, even if you’re barely interested in this stuff, Marvel movies are generally more consistent than Star Wars movies at this point. So, if you grant the premise that Star Wars needs help, Feige seems like the kind of guy who would be perfect for the job. Back in 2018, Kevin Feige even appeared on the official Star Wars Show on YouTube and professed his love for all the old Star Wars books you loved in the ’90s.

7 of the most overused lines in war movies

Feige talking about Star Wars in 2018.

(Lucasfilm)

Relevantly, Feige is not the first big Marvel honcho to crossover to Star Wars. The new Disney+ TV series, The Mandalorian, is set after the events of Return of the Jedi and is being helmed by Jon Favreau, the guy who directed the first Iron Man in 2008.

Because Star Wars and Marvel are both controlled by Disney, some might think the Kevin Feige thing is the sign of an Avengers/Skywalkers crossover, but Lucasfilm will probably never let that happen. And yet, if you’re holding out hope that a new Star Wars movie will be just as a good — or at least as entertaining — as Avengers: Endgame — it looks like that wish will be granted very soon.

As of this writing, there’s no word yet when the Kevin Feige-produced Star Wars project will drop.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

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