How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero - We Are The Mighty
MIGHTY MOVIES

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

Recently, Brie Larson paid a visit to Nellis Air Force Base in preparation for the upcoming Marvel film, Captain Marvel, set for a 2019 release. Accompanying her was Staff Sgt. Don Wallace, an F-15 crew chief with the 57th Maintenance Group. Larson donned a flight suit, toured the base while learning the history of the F-15C, and met with Brig. Gen. Jeannie Leavitt, the commander of the 57th Wing at Nellis AFB.


Brig. Gen. Leavitt became the first female fighter pilot in 1993 after the Defense Secretary lifted the ban on women flying in combat — over sixty-one years after Amelia Earhart made her historic, transatlantic flight. Brig. Gen. Leavitt is a major, real-life inspiration behind the character, Captain Marvel.

 

Larson was said to be very friendly, down-to-earth, and eager to learn everything she could about the U.S. Air Force. She was very interested in learning on how G-forces act on a pilot during intense maneuvers and the mission capabilities of the F-15.

Larson was very accommodating with fans, taking photos with airmen and even getting on an airman’s FaceTime for a friend.

 

Not many details about Captain Marvel are known other than it is set in the 1990’s Marvel Cinematic Universe and it will follow the comic book character, Carol Danvers. In the comics, Danvers is a fighter pilot who gains superpowers after an alien invasion. She’s also key member of The Avengers. Since the film is set in the 90’s and Samuel L. Jackson is confirmed to appear in the film, it’s safe to assume that this film will center around the superhero world between Captain America: The First Avenger and Iron Man.

MIGHTY MOVIES

7 military movie cliches that are just plain confusing

There’s rarely a middle ground with military films. Either they’re masterpieces worthy of every accolade given or they’re so bad that troops turn them into drinking games, taking a shot every time something completely unrealistic happens.


Great military films take an in-depth look at actual service members and veterans and are written based on real experiences. The laughable, however, just take a quick glance at how other war films have done it and copy the wrong notes. This is how we end up with so many awful cliches that may work in a film, but would never happen in the real world.

1. Choice of mission

Many films use some variation of Mission: Impossible‘s “your mission, should you choose to accept it…” line. Sure, that works for Ethan Hunt — because he’s not a soldier and is able to make choices.

Troops don’t have that luxury. If the commander says it, that’s an order.

Using the TV series just to remind everyone Mission: Impossible existed before Tom Cruise.

2. Troops were secretly the bad guys all along

This one is most prevalent among movies set in some post-apocalyptic world. It turns out our reluctant protagonist now has to fight the “big bad” U.S. military because… uh… reasons?

Let’s take, for example, nearly every single zombie film. So, the world has already come to an end. At this point, the military would be too busy trying to restore order with some sort of martial law, but in the movies, the military is most concerned with figuring how to best weaponize zombies against their enemies (ignoring the fact that, if the world ended, the enemy was probably also ended by zombies). Once this revelation comes to light, everyone in the platoon is just totally cool with gunning down the protagonists.

what?

Seriously, why are the only loyal and obedient soldiers evil? 

3. Walking off post (while deployed)

To be completely fair to the modern war films that do this, yes: troops get more time off than most people think. We’re not on patrol every single waking moment of a deployment. That doesn’t mean, however, that we have the free time, ability, or desire to walk off-post to grab a beer.

There’s been one high-profile individual who’s done this and, uh, let’s just say that the military community doesn’t think highly of it.

Yeah, there’re many other things wrong with The Hurt Locker, but those have been pointed out a million and a half times. 

4. Vehicles are always breaking down

It feels like whenever our heroes need to make a big break for it, the damn vehicle craps out on them.

Seriously, this cliche rears its head more often than a teenager trips as they try to escape Jason Voorhees. There are mechanics in the military and they do take pride in their work.

Even great films can’t avoid cliches. 

5. Saying the phrase, “with all due respect”

Characters find the courage within themselves to stand up to the high-ranking officer and say something that starts with, “with all due respect…” Suddenly, they’re given free reign to say whatever’s on their mind.

Nope. That’s a really quick way to get demoted. The line works in Talladega Nights because it’s not a war film. But even in Talladega Nights, they acknowledge that the line is, basically, worthless.

Ricky Bobby is basically every E-3 in the military. 

6. Everything about the phrase, “if I told you, I’d have to kill you”

On film, how do show a spy tiptoeing around the fact that they’re a spy? Ah, yes! By having them almost tell someone in a bar — perfect!

Actual agents don’t even tell their families that they’re spies, let alone some random person at the bar. Thankfully, the granddaddy of all film spies, James Bond, doesn’t stoop that low.

It happens far more than you’d think. 

7. No one is willing to fight until the protagonist gives a speech

It’s the darkest moment of the film. The good guys have nearly lost and the enemy is all around them. There’s only one person with the newfound courage to rally the troops. They stand in front of everyone and deliver a passionate speech. Those words inspire in everyone the courage they need to stand up and win. Our hero did it! Everyone lived and the bad guys lost. Roll credits…

Actual speeches before troops go out and “fight the good fight” usually involve safety briefs, radio frequencies, and contingency plans. In real life, nobody needs some Academy-Award winning speech before fighting the bad guys.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEOOZDbMrgE

“Now that you mention it… Yeah, I do like freedom.”

*Bonus* Famous last words

To be completely real for a moment, I can almost guarantee the phrase “what the f*ck?” is a much more common set of last words than, “tell my wife… *cough* I love her.”

MIGHTY MOVIES

Watch bunnies prepare for war in new ‘Watership Down’ trailer

The BBC released the first trailer for mini-series Watership Down, based on the 1972 Richard Adams novel, and it looks pretty intense. This group of rabbits in Southern England is up against the entire world. When Fiver (Nicholas Hoult) starts having visions of his home being destroyed, all of the rabbits go on a journey to find someplace new to live. It’s terribly dangerous, though. Humans, dogs, foxes, birds, and other rabbits are trying to kill them.


This book was made into an animated movie in 1978, which looked like it was made for kids. It was not and infamously scarred a generation of young children. There’s a lot of brutal death in the novel and it’s a little similar to Lord of the Rings, so don’t be fooled by the adorable rabbits.

Watership Down: Trailer – BBC

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The voice cast for this mini-series is stacked. Nicholas Hoult (The Favourite) and James McAvoy (Glass) lead the cast as brother rabbits. John Boyega (The Last Jedi), Olivia Colman (The Favourite), Ben Kingsley (The Jungle Book), Daniel Kaluuya (Get Out) and Peter Capaldi (Doctor Who) also lend their voices to characters in Watership Down. Sam Smith recorded the song “Fire on Fire” for the film as well.

Watership Down‘s story will be told in four parts. It’s going to be released on the BBC in the United Kingdom on Dec. 22 and Dec. 23, 2018, and it’ll come to Netflix on the Dec. 23, 2018. That’s just in time for the holidays, but remember the movie is probably not suitable for young children — unless they can handle a lot of animal death.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

Final ‘Joker’ trailer teases Batman connection

The final trailer for Joker debuted online Aug. 28, 2019, giving viewers more information about the plot, introducing several new characters (including Robert De Niro as a talk show host), and taking a deeper look into the mind of Arthur Fleck as he transforms into the titular villain. The trailer is already drumming up Oscar buzz for Joaquin Phoenix and is getting a positive response across the board. But there is still one thing fans may be asking after watching: Where is Batman?

Since the movie was first announced, people have wondered if it would be connected to the Batman universe or function as a standalone film just focusing on the Joker. Based on the final trailer, it initially seems Joker may be the latter, as there is no sign of the caped crusader.


However, while Bruce Wayne may be nowhere to be found, we do meet a character who has a clear connection to the crime-fighting billionaire: Bruce’s dad Thomas (played by Edward Cullen). He is only in the trailer for a brief moment but his screen time is memorable.

“Is this a joke to you?” Thomas asks a laughing Fleck before punching him in the face.

JOKER – Final Trailer

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It’s an interesting choice to potentially have the Joker exist long before Batman because, in the comics and movies, the Joker is often depicted as a direct reaction to Batman. A destructive force of chaos that fights against Bruce Wayne’s never-ending fight for order and justice. Instead, the trailer implies that this version of the character emerges as a response to the bitter, cruel world that laughs at his miserable existence.

Or maybe the real twist will be that when Fleck finally reaches the point of no return, his first act as the Joker will be killing Thomas and Martha Wayne, unknowingly creating his future nemesis. It would be a clever callback to Tim Burton’s Batman movie and a nice way to set up a potential larger cinematic universe.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Watch CIA Chief of Disguise break down iconic spy scenes

Joanna Mendez, former Central Intelligence Agency Chief of Disguise, watched spy scenes from a variety of films and television shows in order to break down how accurate they really are. From Jason Bourne finding his cache of passports and foreign currency to Carrie Mathison’s (Homeland) half-assed “disguise” through airport security, Mendez doesn’t hold back in her opinions and expertise.

During her 27-year career, her position in the CIA’s Office of Technical Service involved providing operational disguises and alias training in hostile theaters of the Cold War from Moscow to Havana. Her duties included clandestine photography and preparing CIA assets with the use of intelligence-collecting equipment like spy cameras, as well as processing the information brought in.

Think “Q” — James Bond Q, not Star Trek…

Now retired, Mendez continues to consult with the U.S. Intelligence community as well as lecture with her husband Antonio Mendez, also a retired intelligence officer, with whom she has published several books about their covert experience including Spy Dust, which reveals “the tools and operations that helped win the Cold War,” and Argo, which would become an Academy Award-winning film of the same name that told the story of “the most audacious rescue in history.”

In the video below, Mendez lets her critiques fly. Check it out:


Former CIA Chief of Disguise Breaks Down 30 Spy Scenes From Film & TV | WIRED

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“Carrie’s disguise, which basically consisted of dying her hair…was absolutely ineffective. She’s still Carrie…but with dark hair. She could have cut her hair and restyled it. She could have changed her makeup. She could have put on sunglasses to hide that crazy-eyed look she has…” claps Mendez.

She then jumped to a scene from Alias where Jennifer Garner nails her disguise. “She didn’t just dye her hair — she dyed it outrageously red and then adopted the whole persona to go with it. We could have used that as a training film!” she laughed.

Mendez moves on to Matthew Rhys’ character in The Americans. “He was never trying to look good. He came really close to projecting ‘the little gray man’ that we would talk about at the CIA. You wanted to be forgettable,” she commended.

Mendez then moves on to a “quick change,” the name for a move where an agent clandestinely changes his appearance in 37 seconds. She commented on Mission Impossible III, and in particular discusses why Tom Cruise’s “priest” would have been ethically off-limits.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

From Megan Fox in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, to Ansel Elgort in Baby Driver, Mendez breaks down the “quick change” further — and also warns against stealing.

The video covers blending in with the crowd in James Bond — and CIA inventions that helps its agents remain discrete; being assigned a new identity in Spy; cultural customs in Inglorious Bastards; and life-like masks that cover the entire face in order to give the appearance of a completely different face.

The video is highly entertaining, not just because it grabs clips from iconic pop culture favorites (Austin Powers and Sherlock Holmes make appearances) but also because Joanna Mendez has a great, wry humor (“we never tried to disguise ourselves as furniture at the CIA…”).

Watch the full video above and find out what the CIA really thinks about black cat suits and seducing the enemy!
MIGHTY MOVIES

The ancient roots of the film ‘The Warriors’ will surprise you

The Warriors was controversial when it was released in 1979. Some critics panned it for stilted dialogue and lazy writing; President Ronald Reagan enjoyed it so much he had it screened at Camp David. The story of a street gang fighting its way through New York City to make their way home continues to captivate audiences today. But how many people know the book that the movie was based on?

The Warriors is based on the novel of the same name by Sol Yurick. However, Yurick’s work is based on the ancient Greek philosopher Xenophon’s Anabasis. Anabasis is Xenophon’s autobiographical account of the march of the Ten Thousand mercenaries through Asia Minor (modern Turkey).


In 401 BC, the Persian emperor was Artaxerxes II. His brother, Cyrus the Younger, had spent years preparing to seize the throne and was now primed to strike. Cyrus hired Xenophon’s Ten Thousand to march through Asia Minor and meet up with his own army in Mesopotamia so Cyrus could overthrow Artaxerxes.

Fans of the movie can probably guess how Cyrus’s plans turned out. At the Battle of Cunaxa the rebels were defeated and Cyrus was killed, leaving Xenophon and the Ten Thousand stranded in enemy territory with a furious emperor on their heels.

Anabasis (a Greek word meaning “a march up country”) details the experiences of Xenophon and the remaining Ten Thousand during their march north through Mesopotamia. The army was traveling to the Black Sea, where the Greeks could escape to their own coastal cities. Xenophon and his men were forced to fight their way home through hostile forces in one of the Western world’s first nonfiction adventure stories.

The Warriors follows Xenophon’s narrative rather closely. The film begins as Cyrus, a powerful gang leader in New York, calls a meeting of all the city’s gangs to work together and overthrow the police. However, Cyrus is assassinated and the blame falls on the Warriors, another gang which now has to fight its way to their turf of Coney Island through gangs and police alike.

The parallels between the Warriors and the Ten Thousand are striking. The Ten Thousand consisted mostly of hoplites, Greek soldiers who formed an interlocking wall of shields in a rectangular formation called a phalanx. The strength of the phalanx was the strength of the men holding it up; if one man broke formation, then everyone was put in danger. Similarly, the Warriors depend on each other to survive their perilous journey through New York. In both narratives, the soldiers or the gang members cannot survive without one another.

The Anabasis was widely influential throughout ancient Greece. According to some ancients, the Anabasis inspired King Philip of Macedon to conquer Greece. Xenophon’s descriptions of the Persian landscape were so detailed that supposedly, Philip’s son Alexander the Great used the Anabasis to navigate his own invasion of the Persian Empire.

Hundreds of years later, the parallels between Xenophon and Alexander were still being noted by the Greeks. Arrian of Nicomedia titled his histories of Alexander The Anabasis of Alexander and wrote it in seven books, just like Xenophon.

Unfortunately, The Warriors was also an inspiration for violence. The film was popular with street gangs, who would often encounter each other going to or coming back from the movie. There were three killings in the weekend after the release of The Warriors.

The violence did not stop the film from becoming a commercial success. The film made .5 million on a million budget, and in recent years became a cult film that currently holds a 90 percent approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

The Warriors, like the Anabasis, is a classical tale of companionship, survival, and homecoming, that continue to be popular in the modern day. The next time you watch this classic film, remember that there were real people for whom that ending walk on the beach meant home.

MIGHTY MOVIES

16 jokes Germans could die for telling under the Nazi regime

When the Nazis came to power in January 1933, the party only won 37 percent of the vote across Germany. In the Reichstag, the German parliament, the National Socialists only controlled a third of the seats when Hitler came to power. When they held another election two months later, after crushing other parties and quieting opposition, they still only won 43 percent of the vote and less than half of the Reichstag.


How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
The Reichstag (like everything else) became less relevant once they burned it down.

So it’s safe to say that not every German was huge supporter of the Nazi party and its leadership. But after a while, criticizing the government became more and more hazardous to one’s health. How does a population who can’t openly object to their government blow off the built-up popular anger among friends? With jokes.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Austrians started it.

For many Germans, laughing at Hitler within their homes was the most they could do. Far from brainwashed, they were fed up with the laws forcing them to do things against their will. As Rudolph Herzog writes in “Dead Funny: Telling Jokes in Hitler’s Germany,” these jokes could get you in a concentration camp or in front of a firing squad. These are the jokes people living under Hitler and the Third Reich told each other.

1. The crude behavior of regime officials offended Germans immediately.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
The German word “wählen” means “to dial someone” and “to vote for someone.”

2. Did you notice a lot of Nazis were overweight? So did the Germans.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Sounds like someone could almost be American.

3. Not all Germans were thrilled to greet each other with “Heil Hitler.”

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Failing to make the greeting could get your kids taken away.

4. Everyone knew who really set the Reichstag fire.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
The SA were the Nazis’ unofficial thug army.

5. Clergy were the first to point out Hitler’s hypocrisy.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

6. Germans wondered why the Nazis pretended to have a justice system.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
They felt the laws were arbitrary in the first place.

7. Many Germans knew of some concentration camps and what happened to dissenters there.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Rumors abounded in Hitler’s Germany.

8. Dachau was the one everyone knew about.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
This shows the risk of telling jokes in the wrong company.

9. German Jews who escaped joked about those who stayed.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
The punchline asks which was more dangerous?

10. The people knew what was coming.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
They weren’t prepared for the scope of it.

11. Their Italian allies weren’t exempt from ridicule.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
This was at the beginning.

12. Italian inability didn’t go unnoticed.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
The end came quick for Italy.

13. After a while, the German people felt stupid for believing it all.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

14. They got more cutting as time passed.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Someone was executed by guillotine for telling this one.

15. Telling this joke was considered a misdemeanor:

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

16. The end became apparent in jokes long before the reality of the situation.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

MIGHTY MOVIES

The next ‘Star Wars’ show on Disney+ isn’t the one you expected

Just a few months after the final episodes of Star Wars: The Clone Wars hit Disney+, the streaming service announced that a spin-off series would premiere next year.

The Bad Batch seems primed to follow a structure that’s worked well in plenty of TV shows and movies, in everything from The Great Escape to Captain Planet to the Avengers films. It will revolve around “the unique and experimental clones” of Clone Force 99, a group of clone soldiers genetically distinct from the rest of the Clone Army. Basically, this isn’t the Ewan McGregor Obi-Wan show you were promised, but instead a spin-off from the existing (and complicated) animated Star Wars shows that have been running for over a decade.


All four members of the Bad Batch have a “desirable mutation” that makes them formidable soldiers. Crosshair has enhanced eyesight, Wrecker is strong, Tech is intelligent, and Clone Sergeant Hunter, the leader of the crew, has enhanced sensory abilities.

Twitter

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The Bad Batch was first introduced in the final season of The Clone Wars, so it’s appropriate that Dave Filoni — a director, writer, animator, and producer on that series — will executive produce the spin-off. Filoni is a key figure in Disney’s Star Wars plans, doing animation for The Force Awakens and four other animated Star Wars series. He also directed, wrote, and executive produced episodes of The Mandalorian.

All in all, this is good news for parents whose kids are still mourning the loss of The Clone Wars, as the creative talent and choice of subject matter for The Bad Batch makes it seem as though the new series will preserve what made the old one great. That said, it is kind of bad news for parents who wanted a little bit more of a strong female lead, Ahsoka Tano, or, you know, a new Star Wars show that wasn’t a cartoon.

Star Wars: The Bad Batch will come to Disney+ in 2021.

And, luckily, The Mandalorian Season 2 will still hit Disney+ sometime in late 2020.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY MOVIES

New John Wick trailer calls for ‘guns – lots of guns’

In the year of highly-anticipated sequels, there’s no franchise we’re more excited to see return to the big screen than John Wick, as the dog-loving former hitman is returning for a third round of ass-kicking with John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum. And based on the latest trailer for Chapter 3, it looks like Keanu Reeves may be borrowing a bit from his other leading role in a major action franchise: Neo from The Matrix.

While the trailer reveals a bit more about the plot and characters, including highlighting the tense relationship between Wick and Sofia (Halle Berry), the real takeaway is the several references made to The Matrix trilogy. Most notably, Wick visits Winston (Ian McShane), the evil owner of the Continental Hotel, and when Winston asks what he needs, Keanu redelivers one of the most iconic lines of his storied action career.


“Guns,” Wick tells Winston. “Lots of guns.”

Immediately following this interaction, the trailer seems to further acknowledge Keanu’s action roots by having Wick take on a bunch of faceless assassins in room that has green-tinted lighting that is unmistakably Matrix-esque. All that is missing is Wick declaring he knows Kung-Fu, though don’t be surprised if they’re saving that for the movie.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum (2019 Movie) New Trailer – Keanu Reeves, Halle Berry

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Besides the Matrix references, the trailer also features The Director giving Wick an ominous warning.

“There’s no escape for you,” She tells Wick. Later in the trailer, she also wonders why Wick is willing to go through all of this for just a puppy but Wick quickly lets her know Daisy “wasn’t just a puppy.”

John Wick has become perhaps the most beloved action franchise of the last decade, with the first and second films both being a hit with audiences and critics alike. And it looks like the third chapter is kicking the action up a notch, with the trailer showing Wick kicking ass while riding a motorcycle and a horse.

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum comes to theaters on May 17, 2019.

This article originally appeared on Fatherly. Follow @FatherlyHQ on Twitter.

MIGHTY CULTURE

Why we all need to understand the Medal of Honor

There’s an extraordinary brotherhood that exists among us but few will ever actually meet these honored members. Like our sacred flag, woven together by humility, valor and extreme courage, this is a community of men who never sought recognition — rather earned it — through their own strength, service and sacrifice. These incredible heroes are the recipients of the Medal of Honor.

In the military community, these men are treated with an indescribable reverence; a gratitude that runs deep because of the understanding of the gravity of the citation. Most of these men shouldn’t be alive and many who have earned the Medal never lived to see it. But in the civilian community, the awards often blend together, confusing hearts with crosses, silver with purple.


Now, a major motion picture is closing that information gap, educating the public on the Medal of Honor while pulling at your heartstrings. The Last Full Measure, in theaters nationwide on January 24, has an all star cast that tells the incredible, true story of William H. Pitsenbarger. Pitsenbarger was a U.S. Air Force Pararescueman credited with saving over 60 men after an ambush on the Army’s 1st Infantry Division during a battle in Vietnam. The story couples his heroic actions with the relentless efforts, spanning three decades, made by the men he saved to ensure he was posthumously honored.

Following the Washington, D.C. premiere screening of The Last Full Measure, We Are The Mighty had the opportunity to sit with Medal of Honor recipient First Lieutenant Brian M. Thacker and Medal of Honor Foundation Vice President of External Affairs Dan Smith, to get their take on the movie.

WATM: Tell me your thoughts on the movie.

Thacker: This fills in so many blanks. I knew the Pitsenbarger story and then all of a sudden it kind of happened. In the story, it becomes very clear. The question you have is what was the Air Force guy doing with a leg unit in the first place? And then you think about it and yeah, it’s exactly how it works: the guys closest respond to the call. They were doing joint operations back then and they didn’t even know it. The movie is no frills, a straight story of not just Pitsenbarger, but the whole unit that kept the dream of the award moving forward. It’s a story that needs to be told. There’s a story like that behind every Medal of Honor ever presented.

If you were over there, you know there are many other stories that deserve to be recognized. For a long time, Pitsenbarger was one of them.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

WATM: I understand why this story is so important for the Medal of Honor brotherhood and to the veteran population. Why do you think it’s critical for civilians to see as well?

Thacker: First of all, they need to learn what the Medal means. It’s not a me award. Pitsenbarger is the medic with the award, but it really goes to all of the men in that company that were put in an untenable situation. The stories that came out of what happens as a result are equally as important. It’s not over when the shooting stops. The camaraderie and the close bond of serving together is what gets us through.

WATM: There’s a great line in the movie about how the medal means so much more than a battle; it’s the story behind it that connects us all. What story does your medal tell?

Thacker: The other half of the story behind mine is that of a Recon Sergeant that got an assignment he didn’t want but came out with a DSC. My guess is that his citation, like mine, was written at the highest level. But our unit was a Joe six pack, a bunch of people from all over the country that didn’t realize how untenable our situation was really going to be until the first shot was fired. Then it was, ‘Oh Lord, just let us hang on. We just need to get through this day.’ It all comes down to everyone just trying to help each other get through the day. Certainly you don’t do it by yourself.

WATM to Smith: What does having a MOH recipient in the audience tonight mean to you?

Smith: It’s beyond special. Young airman Pitsenbarger’s story is inspiring and remarkable. What we try to do and what our mission is, is to raise resources to let recipients tell their stories and to bring that and the legacy of the Medal to the communities. The most senior leaders in our military and our government talk about the less than one percent who serve and this growing civilian and military divide.

For these gentlemen to be able to tell their stories, not just to the military but to the community will close this gap. I’m hopeful that everyday people will see this movie, hear these heroic stories and change the ambivalence that often comes without knowing the impact of the award. So many men came home from Vietnam and weren’t able to tell their stories. I’m hopeful this will reach not just veterans of that generation but the younger generations as well.

WATM: What do you think this film teaches the next generation?

Thacker: We did everything we could to bury Vietnam. The young people that were born after the war grew up in the dark, unless you were living with a Vietnam veteran and you were living it right with your dad. It’s very symbolic. We see the same thing with young people who volunteered after 9/11; this mentality that I need to be a part of this. It’s 50 years later but it’s the same ethic that bubbles up.

You can take that notion of service far beyond the military. It’s in the fire departments, police departments and even the teaching community; this sense of service above self. You see bits and pieces of that in this movie and I hope it’s one the kids will watch because it’s living history.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero

WATM: Was there any particular scene in this movie that really resonated with you?

Thacker: When Pitsenbarger realized he had to go down to help them to teach them how to use the litter. Being in that position does something to your pucker factor. People who have been there, you can ask them: ‘Do you remember what it felt like?’ They’ll tell you they were very afraid. Knowing you are in over your head and wondering who you turn to for help, that happens all the time. There will be a lot of people who understand that feeling of all of a sudden being in charge.

WATM: As a MOH recipient, I imagine you’re invited to events like this all of the time. Is there a particular event you have been a part of that has had a profound impact on your life?

Thacker: Being able to attend an Inauguration and to witness the peaceful transfer of power was an incredible experience. I don’t think people understand how truly special and uniquely American that is.

WATM: Is there anything else you want people to know about either you or the Medal of Honor Foundation?

Thacker: We still have something to say. I remember when the Baby Boom generation wasn’t going to amount to much. Now we’re saying the same thing about Millenials, and I promise you, we’ll be as wrong about them as our parents were about us. That willingness to stand up and take the risk is fairly common.

Smith: These men have incredible stories to tell. My hope is that through films like The Last Full Measure we’ll be able to connect communities with this heroism.

The Last Full Measure will be in theaters January 24. These stories deserve to be told and the valor of The Medal of Honor should live on through all of us. Perpetuating the legacy should be our collective Last Full Measure.

You can buy tickets to see the film and support this story and legacy on The Last Full Measure’s website.

MIGHTY MOVIES

9 times the American flag costume was taken to another level

The United States Flag Code is tricky. It is federal law, but the only penalty in Title 18, burning the flag in a disrespectful manner, was ruled as free speech but the Supreme Court.


Everything outside of that considered less of a felony offense and more in a gray area. It might seem cute and patriotic to have American flag toothpicks, napkins, or beach towels, but it’s kind of disrespectful to wipe the burger grease off with the American flag and throw it aside.

That being said, the most commonly pointed out violation is with costumes or attire. The flag symbolizes freedom so it’s everyone’s right to do whatever they feel right with it, respectfully or (as much as it irks me to say it) disrespectfully.

Every entry on this list is done with good intentions. Some hit their mark — others didn’t.

#1. Macho Man Randy Savage

Nothing screams ‘Murica like good ol’ professional wrestling.

Macho Man is ready to elbow drop any commie bast*rd with just his style alone.

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OOOOOOooooohhh YEEEEAaaaaahhhhh!!

#2. Tomi Lauren

It’s actually kind of cool, rocking the American flag as a cape strapped at the wrists like she’s Storm from the X-Men.

But every last bit of her cool points are lost, however. I’m sorry. No one can #MakeHalloweenGreatAgain wearing a fanny pack. People still laugh at Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson for wearing a fanny pack back in the 90’s. Even “The Rock” mocks “The Rock” for wearing a fanny pack back in the 90’s.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
No one can ever make fanny packs great again.

#3. Vanilla Ice

The one of the faces of mainstream early 90’s Hip Hop loved his country.

They were fashionable enough to spark imitation through out the 90’s. But do his red, white, and blue tracksuits and leather jackets still hold up in 2017?

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The answer is no. They didn’t.

#4. Chris Evans (as Captain America)

You best believe that the Superhero with America in his name rocks the American flag on his super suit.

As early as March 1941, Cap can usually be found rocking the same style. Blue field and white star on the top half, red and white stripes down the abs.

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You are now aware that his super suit is closer to the Puerto Rican flag than the US flag. But hey! Puerto Rico is still a part of the United States of America, so it works.

#5. Katy Perry

She actually rocks the American flag quite often. Always with flair.

Her outfit for Fleet Week was simple, yet still flashy. The only way to complete an outfit like this is with a Marine on her arms.

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She kissed a Marine and she liked it.

#6. Kid Rock

Quickest way to make an outfit using Old Glory? Cut a hole down the middle and wear it as a poncho like Kid Rock did during the 2003 Superbowl.

Just watch out. People won’t take kindly to you cutting the American flag.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
I’m still imagining what it would be like if he actually ran for Senate and won.

#7. Carl Weathers (as Apollo Creed)

Apollo Creed always worked into the ring with patriotic trunks. What really took it to the next level is when in Rocky IV, he fought Ivan Drago in the most American way possible: by bringing his Soviet opponent to Vegas and dressing as Uncle Sam. *Spoiler Alert* It doesn’t work out well.

Although it is a touching moment when his son dons his red, white, and blue trunks in the 2015 film, Creed.

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#8. Lady Gaga

Great outfit and extremely dignified rendition of “The Star Spangled Banner” at Super Bowl 50.

Just hurts that her outfit in her music video “Telephone” has the field on the wrong side.

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#9. Hulk Hogan

There will always be a soft spot in my heart for pro wrestling — wacky and crazy gimmicks and all. Very long and convoluted story cut short, the other half of The Mega Powers (with the previously mentioned Macho Man) came back after Wrestlemania XIX billed as Mr. America. Using the same poses, walk music, move set, and fooling no one.

Still very patriotic though.

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As if the mustache wasn’t a dead give away…

*Bonus* This Corgi

No one can out patriot this puppy.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Who’s a good little patriot? You are! Yes, you are! Yes, you are!

MIGHTY MOVIES

How the 6 armies in a North Korean war would be like ‘Game of Thrones’ houses

While on a Christmas tour in the Middle East, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Robert Neller, spoke to the troops and brought up the potential of a future fight in North Korea. He told the troops, “It would be Game of Thrones-like, and a lot of people would get hurt. I might be wrong, but it’s a very complicated issue.” He’s not entirely wrong.


While his words were in reference to the bloodshed and brutality of war, the build up to conflict isn’t too much of a stretch. The fighting in Game of Thrones is brutal and many of the foot soldiers are up against insurmountable odds — much like a full-scale war between several nations. Many of the events in Game of Thrones happen because of a war that took place before the series began — much like the real world after the Korean War.

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Grunts on deployment, am I right?

It also doesn’t hurt that both military life and the show have a lot of fighting, sex (including prostitution, unfortunately), and alcohol in them.

Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t caught up to the season finale of season seven, we recommend viewing one of our other great articles. If you have been keeping up with the series or just don’t care about spoilers, please enjoy a nerdy tongue-firmly-in-cheek response proving the Commandant of the USMC is more correct than he lead on.

6. North Korea is basically House Lannister

If you think about it, Kim Jong-un and King Joffery Baratheon have countless similarities. They’re both spoiled, rich, psychopathic brats who paint an image of godliness, who are very privileged thanks to the work of their predecessors, and yet they both demand unwavering respect without doing anything to earn it themselves.

As much as we laugh at the young dictators, they have plenty of power and control. One reason the Lannisters and North Korea weren’t eliminated right away was because of how they retaliate. The Starks won every battle in the War of Five Kings, but were slaughtered at the Red Wedding. The Tyrell line was straight up murdered in a holy place — along with thousands of innocent civilians. Hell, even the Lannister song Rains of Castermere is about how they’ll obliterate anyone in retaliation (damn, it’s a great song, tho…).

In real life, Seoul could suffer the same ruthless fate. Even if without the threat of nuclear warfare, just the conventional artillery on the border laying siege on the South Korean capital could put the death toll in the millions.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
They both also throw large feasts while their people starve.

5. South Korea is basically House Targaryen

South Korean history is rich and beautiful, dating back to when the Korean Empire stood tall  much like House Targaryen. They were both overthrown and crushed to near nothingness, but quickly rose to be key powers in their conflicts.

The post-Korean War economy of South Korea was devastated and their military might was worse, just like how the Targaryens would eventually dwindle to just Daenerys Targaryen. With the simple push from a friend (Daenerys’ gift of the dragon eggs and South Korea’s support from the U.S), they are now each among the most intimidating militaries in the world.

The Republic of Korea Armed Forces is one of the most technologically advanced modern militaries, which will be the cornerstone of the next battle, should it come to that.

Just like a Dragon.

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That, and they both definitely have air superiority over their enemies.

4. Japan Self-Defense Force is basically the Freefolk from Beyond the Wall

Once a primary enemy of many others on this list, they’re refocused on turning foes into allies to face the real threats.

Now their small populations are the most threatened, making them willing to do whatever it takes to survive.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
They are now hand in hand with the Starks/Americans, but we’ll get to that in a second.

3. China is basically House Greyjoy

Each have the most intimidating naval forces in their given worlds, even if they’re not the largest. While the Lannisters (North Korea) could talk a big game and maybe hold their own currently, their strong arm is still House Greyjoy (China.)

The Chinese government also “does not sow” when it comes to taking islands in the South China Sea. On the bright side, the rebels (Theon and Yara Greyjoy AKA Taiwan) who left the main land/house are devoted allies to the Targaryens.

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They both also somehow get impressively badass ships out of nowhere.

2. The United States of America is basically House Stark

Which leaves the honorable and — hardest fighting — armies, the Starks and the Americans. Each of the four remaining Starks make up the four branches of the Department of Defense.

The toughest fighter is definitely Jon Snow, our Marine. They even have experience fighting in the last war in the frozen north at (Battle of Chosin Reservoir for Marines and Beyond the Wall for Jon Snow). The special operations of the Special Forces and over all battle skill matches Arya Stark. The invaluable support and “eyes in the sky” that both the Air Force and Bran Stark have will be what makes this war. This leaves Sansa Stark for the Navy, because neither are really fighters — they’re more tactical support.

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
And are both their militaries lead by someone who the internet thinks is possibly a deity? Yep!

1. Putin is basically a White Walker

The sleeper threat. Though they emerge as the real enemies of the balance in their respective worlds, everyone turns a blind eye to them while they destroy, conquer, and expand their reach. Neither seem interested in having allies, just minions.

It also doesn’t hurt their cause when everyone focuses on them; the Lannisters (North Korea) and Greyjoys (China) benefit. They’re also the primary enemy of the Freefolk (Japan) and, eventually, the Starks (Americans.)

How Brie Larson is getting ready to be a USAF pilot turned superhero
Putin would probably ride a dragon into battle shirtless or something equally douchey though…

MIGHTY MOVIES

Behind the scenes with ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ director

After Tim Miller built a successful career in visual effects with his company, Blur Studio — whose work spans from the Ninja Ninja arcade sequence in 2010’s “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,” to the opening credits in 2011’s “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” — he became a savior in some corners of the fanboy space by directing 2016’s long-delayed “Deadpool” feature film.

The movie went on to be the highest-grossing R-rated movie ever at the worldwide box office until it was recently dethroned by “Joker.” But due to creative differences, Miller exited “Deadpool 2” before it was made.

Now Miller is back to helm of another IP in triage.


“Terminator: Dark Fate” (in theaters Nov 1, 2019) is a complete overhaul of the franchise. “Dark Fate” ignores parts three, four, and five, and picks up where “Terminator 2: Judgement Day” left off. This time there is a new future in despair, and a new Terminator, but Linda Hamilton is back to play Sarah Connor, along with franchise creator James Cameron in a producer role (the most hands-on he’s been since “T2”).

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Miller talked to Business Insider about some of the major decisions made behind-the-scenes, including talk of the movie having simultaneous PG-13 and R-rated releases, and the disagreement Miller had with Cameron over a time-travel element.

Jason Guerrasio: These are some of the better reviews a “Terminator” movie has had in over a decade. That has to make you feel warm and fuzzy inside.

Tim Miller: Well, there are enough split reviews that I just feel warm maybe not fuzzy. I know lots of people have franchise fatigue and it was going to get dinged for being the sixth “Terminator” film, even though it’s the third one. So I was disappointed but not surprised.

Guerrasio: When you came on the project was it already established that the other movies were going to get essentially erased from the canon and this one would take place after the events of “T2”?

Miller: When I came onto the project Jim [Cameron] had not even decided to come back. There were a lot of rights issues, who had what rights, and it was messy. So when I came in it was sort of blank page. [Skydance Media CEO] David [Ellison] asked me to rebuild the franchise. I told him that two things were very important to me: that Jim comes back and that we continue the “T2” story. Many people made different choices since then, which is fine, but I didn’t want to feel beholden to those choices.

Guerrasio: And is it true that while you were filming it wasn’t decided yet if the movie would be PG-13 or R rated, so there was talk at one point that the movie be released simultaneously in a PG-13 cut and an R cut?

Miller: You’re absolutely right, which I think was slightly problematic but overall I think it was a good thing. And here’s why: the disparity of budgets that come with PG-13 and R.

Guerrasio: And not to mention box-office projections.

Miller: Totally. So we didn’t decide to make it an R movie until we were into post. That meant I got all the benefits of making a PG-13 movie in terms of budget and scope and then we switched it to R, which is what we all hoped for.

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(L-R) Mackenzie Davis and Natalia Reyes in “Terminator: Dark Fate.”

(Paramount)

Guerrasio: So when you were shooting did you basically act like you were making an R movie and if that didn’t happen you would tweak in post?

Miller: I would have just used alternate takes. Say I did five takes of a moment, four of them would have “f–k” in it and one of them would not have it. I didn’t think we would do an R because of the temperature at the studio and Skydance, so worse case we do an R-rated release along with a PG-13. So we did talk about a simultaneous release.

Guerrasio: But why does everyone eventually agree it should just go out as R?

Miller: This is going to sound arrogant, I don’t mean it to be, but I do I feel a little bit indirectly responsible for that. “Deadpool” was successful at an R rating, that allowed “Logan” to be made with an R rating, and because “Logan” made more money than any PG-13 Wolverine movie I think there was a realization that some stories are meant to be told a certain way. The DNA of “Terminator” is R rated, and when you change that the fans punish you for it because they feel the false step.

Guerrasio: I don’t think you should feel arrogant at all because I was going to ask, through all this back and forth on if “Dark Fate” should be R or not, couldn’t that all have stopped by you speaking up and saying, “Guys, I made ‘Deadpool’ as an R, why are we f-ing around?”

Miller: [Laughs.] If only I had that kind of juice, oh would I use it. But we did make the case that there are two directors who have made enough money on R-rated movies to justify the budget of “Terminator.” One of them is directing the movie and the other created the franchise.

Guerrasio: How difficult is it to make a movie with a time-travel element in it?

Miller: Well, I think you can do it poorly and make it really confusing because by its nature it’s a confusing structure. We had a lot of conversations and a lot of complexity in making it simple because I don’t believe the audience wants to hear a lot of exposition and theoretical talk about time travel.

Terminator: Dark Fate – Official Trailer (2019) – Paramount Pictures

www.youtube.com

Guerrasio: But give me a glimpse behind the scenes, were there some involved with the movie who really wanted to go far out in regards to time travel?

Miller: Everybody was pretty on board with keeping it simple. At the beginning of the writers’ room, Linda hadn’t agreed to come back. Jim had to make that call to Linda and he didn’t get a no, let’s say, so that made us go down that road feeling she would eventually say yes. The biggest discussion with Jim was at some point there has to be a first time that someone comes from the future. Is Dani (the person the Terminator is on the hunt for, played by Natalia Reyes) a natural in this movie? Is everything that’s happening to her happening for the first time? And that was really the decision to be made, which Jim held onto for a while but I immediately knew we couldn’t do it. Jim really wanted to try to do that and eventually he came around. It wouldn’t have worked when you add in certain plot points in the movie that Grace (a soldier from the future ordered to protect Dani, played by Mackenzie Davis) knows. Future Dani wouldn’t know all that stuff if this was the first time.

Guerrasio: That’s what I mean by time travel getting messy.

Miller: But we do think all that s–t out. For instance, you get dinged in a few reviews when people say, “Why are they calling them Terminators when it’s a new future,” and I thought about that. Dani calls them Terminators because when she meets up with Sarah, she calls them Terminators. So Grace calls them Terminators because Dani called them that. So the cycle makes sense.

Guerrasio: How has the experience of “Deadpool 2” and making this movie made you grow as a filmmaker?

Miller: That’s a tough question to answer. I honestly don’t feel I’m any different a person than I was before I made “Deadpool.” I felt pretty fortunate then. I had a good career in visual effects, I own my own company and get to work with artists everyday. What I love about the live-action filming experience is it’s an intense experience that creates these relationships with people. Many people have said it was the best movie they worked on in terms of the experience, because we have a good time on set. I have some fights with the people above me in the chain of command but never below. Then you’re a dick. Save the anger and fight the people above you. I don’t shy away from that. I feel I used my 15 minutes of fame to collect the greatest concentration of nerd projects ever. I’m the luckiest guy around.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider. Follow @BusinessInsider on Twitter.

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