Widgets Magazine
MIGHTY CULTURE

Why the Army should consider bringing back the Pathfinders

There's an old saying: "It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it." This perfectly sums up the role of the U.S. Army Pathfinders — that is, until Big Army cut sling load on them.

As of Feb. 24, 2017, the last Pathfinder company in the active duty United States Army, F Company, 2nd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, cased their colors, putting an end to decades of highly trained soldiers quickly inserting themselves into hostile territory to secure sites for air support. Before that, the provisional pathfinder companies across the Army quietly cased their colors as well.

The decision to slowly phase out the Pathfinders was a difficult one. Today, the responsibility resides with all troops as the need for establishing new zones in the longest modern war in American history became less of a priority. Yet that doesn't mean that there won't be a need for their return at any given moment.


The Pathfinder schools are still at Fort Benning and Fort Campbell today, but they're largely just seen as the "go-to" schools for overzealous officers trying to stack up their badges. Still, the training received there gives graduates many essential skills needed to complete Pathfinder operations.

To be a Pathfinder, you need to satisfy several prerequisites. Since their primary focus is on establishing a landing site for airborne and air assault troops, you must first be a graduate from either or both schools. The training leans heavily on knowledge learned from both schools, such as sling-load operations, while also teaching the fundamentals of air traffic control.

All of this comes in handy because Pathfinders in the field need to know, down to the foot, exactly what kind of area makes for a suitable, impromptu paratrooper drop zone or helicopter landing zone. These tasks are delicate, and human lives and hundreds of thousands of dollars are often on the line. That's why Pathfinders need to know specifics, like how far apart glow sticks must be placed, to get the job done. Details are crucial.

It's not an understatement to say that there is a bunch of math you'll need to do on the fly. Hope you're well-versed in trigonometry.

(U.S. Army photo by Lori Egan)

These are skills that simply cannot be picked up on the fly. A typical Joe may be able to cover the physical security element of the task, but establishing a landing zone requires some complex math and carefully honed assessments. Creating drop zones for paratroopers is less mission-critical, as the paratroopers themselves are also less mission essential.

Still, the job of establishing landing zones is now put in the hands of less-qualified troops. Pilots can typically wing it, yes, but the job is best left to those who've been specifically trained for the specialized task.

If only there were a unit, typically a company sized element within a Combat Aviation Brigade, that has spent years mastering the art... Oh well...

(U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Jeremy Lock)

Hat tip to our viewer Tim Moriarty for the inspiration.