MIGHTY SPORTS

That time the Panthers ran a play from 'Little Giants'

"The Annexation of Puerto Rico" is a modified fumblerooski.

In 2011, the Carolina Panthers were up 14-0 against the Houston Texans. With time running out in the first half, Carolina ran a trick play that saw quarterback Cam Newton secretly slip the ball between the legs of tight end Richie Brockel after quickly taking the snap. Brockel ran the ball in for another touchdown and the Panthers would win the game, 28-13.

After the game, reporters wanted to know where head coach Ron Rivera drew inspiration for the play. The answer was the movie, Little Giants.


The play even has a name – "The Annexation of Puerto Rico" – and it was devised by the tiny computer nerd, "Nubie," who explained it to John Madden as a slow fake play with the quarterback running to one side of the field and a tailback picking up the ball and swinging around the opposite way.

"The Annexation of Puerto Rico" from the 1994 movie "Little Giants"

The play in Little Giants sounds a lot like the legendary trick play, the fumblerooski, where the hidden ball is purposely set down by the QB who then distracts the opposing team by running with the "ball" or "handing it off" to another player. Then, another player, usually a player no one would suspect, like a lineman, picks it up, and runs it home.

It might literally be the oldest trick in the book, which is what might have attracted Ron Rivera to the "Annexation of Puerto Rico" in the first place.

For the Carolina Panthers, they couldn't purposely forward fumble the ball, that's illegal in the NFL. And they still had to fool the Texans defenders. So Cam Newton takes the quick snap and most of the Carolina players continue the play as if it's moving to the right, while others make key blocks to keep the way clear for Brockel.

Who says real life is nothing like the movies?

Actor Ed O'Neill played Kevin O'Shea, the coach of the Little Giants' number one enemy: the Cowboys. During an interview with NFL analyst Rich Eisen, Eisen told O'Neill the play had actually been used by an NFL team. O'Neill is an avid football fan and former NFL player who was a linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers before being cut by the team in 1969.

He had no idea. His response (with a smile): "You gotta be kidding me."